Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Rate This Thread
Hop To
Page 240 of 259 1 2 238 239 240 241 242 258 259
#4546445 - 11/29/20 04:07 AM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) ***** [Re: Raine]  
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 6,119
carrick58 Offline
Hotshot
carrick58  Offline
Hotshot

Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 6,119
Rupert Harkonen
Underofficer
Jasta 33
Wynghene, Flanders

Victorys: 4
Claims: 1


Nov 29, 1917.

Day off so packed it into town for a show and a visit to the Gardens. to Hoist a few.


Attached Files 7a8a3061921789b21d9df5306a5f5a9e show.jpg81a52b2a3c779a493d6b59ba61344fe8Beer.jpg
Last edited by carrick58; 11/29/20 07:24 PM.
#4546520 - 11/29/20 08:56 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: Nov 2014
Posts: 3,269
Fullofit Online content
Senior Member
Fullofit  Online Content
Senior Member

Joined: Nov 2014
Posts: 3,269
Ajax, ON
VonS, thanks for preparing a DiD friendly FM package, unless I'm mistaken there are no Alb D.V mods in it. Should I assume the vanilla one is good enough?

29 November, 1917 09:45
Saint-Loup-en-Champagne, Marne Sector
Jasta 19
Leutnant Zygmunt Dolf Hahn EK2 EK1 HHO PLM AO
93 confirmed kills

The Strutter Ziggy shot down was credited to him. The one he forced down, was not.
Today’s task was to escort 2 Rumplers from RBZ 6 on reconnaissance of enemy front lines near La Cheppe. They were chasing after the Rumplers who decided to make it a race to the front lines after their rendezvous. Ziggy nearly caught up with them, but then he noticed flashes of wings on his starboard. SPADs were the ones who caught them in turn and a melee ensued. Hahn latched on to one and pulverized it with his Spandaus. It must have been a rookie, for he made little attempt to defend himself. He had him falling out of control, but couldn’t observe if the machine went down. Another SPAD was chasing an Albatros and Ziggy was soon on him. He had him damaged in short order and watched the French machine fall to the ground.

YouTube Link



Once all enemy planes have been cleared, they continued with their mission. It was easy to spot the Rumplers who’ve already started their recce run. The enemy Flak was following them wherever they went. They’ve completed their task and were soon headed back home. Their return trip was uneventful.


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4546533 - 11/29/20 11:19 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: Mar 2011
Posts: 494
VonS Offline
WWI Flight Sims on a Mac
VonS  Offline
WWI Flight Sims on a Mac
Member

Joined: Mar 2011
Posts: 494
@Fullofit, more great flying from Ziggy.

Have responded to your questions regarding Alb. D.V FMs at the bottom of the relevant post here, so as not to derail the DiD Thread with too much FM info.

Von S smile2

Last edited by VonS; 11/30/20 06:47 AM. Reason: Modified post.

// FE2 on a Mac (https://tinyurl.com/FE2onMac) // WOFF on a Mac (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFonMac) // FE2 FMs (https://tinyurl.com/FE2fms) // WOFF FMs (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFfms) // WOTR FMs (https://tinyurl.com/WOTRfms) // WOFF GPU Tuner (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFgputuner) // WOTR GPU Tuner (https://tinyurl.com/WOTRgputuner) // All VonS WOFF/WOTR mods. are tweaks of files that are © OBD Software. //
#4546577 - 11/30/20 12:35 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 4,499
RAF_Louvert Offline
BOC President; Pilot Extraordinaire; Humble Man
RAF_Louvert  Offline
BOC President; Pilot Extraordinaire; Humble Man
Senior Member

Joined: May 2012
Posts: 4,499
L'Etoile du Nord
.

VonS - Nice to see you stopping by. And thanks mucho for the DID-friendly FM list, I will certainly make use of it.

Fullofit - Ziggy did have some easy pickings on that first SPAD, I wonder if the poor Frenchman's controls were stuck, he did nothing to try and get out of the way.

Carrick - Your pilots always seem to have the best luck when it comes to finding a show and a place to drink.

Robert - Nice to see you dropping in again as well. We've already ordered up a round on your tab.

.

Here are Freddy's EOM stats. He managed to knock down one more EA that was confirmed, (a Pfalz up by Ypres), before the month of dreadful weather came to a close.

Captain Frederick Heracles Byron Abbott, DSO MC CdG
65 Squadron RFC
Bailleul Asylum, France
Sopwith Camel
31 kills, 53 claims
157 missions
190.88 hours

.

#4546584 - 11/30/20 01:46 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 7,588
Robert_Wiggins Online smile
BWOC Survivor!...So Far!!
Robert_Wiggins  Online Smile
BWOC Survivor!...So Far!!
Hotshot

Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 7,588
Lindsay, Ontario, Canada
Geez Lou, what a monacher: "Captain Frederick Heracles Byron Abbott,"


(System_Specs)
Case: Cooler Master Storm Trooper
PSU: Ultra X3,1000-Watt
MB: Asus Maximus VI Extreme
Mem: Corsair Vengeance (2x 8GB), PC3-12800, DDR3-1600MHz, Unbuffered
CPU: Intel i7-4770K, OC to 4.427Ghz
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Seidon 240M Liquid CPU Cooler
Vid Card: ASUS GTX 980Ti STRIX 6GB
OS and Games on separate: Samsung 840 Series 250GB SSD
Monitor: Primary ASUS PG27AQ 4k; Secondary Samsung SyncMaster BX2450L
Periphs: MS Sidewinder FFB2 Pro, TrackIR 4

#4546585 - 11/30/20 01:49 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 4,499
RAF_Louvert Offline
BOC President; Pilot Extraordinaire; Humble Man
RAF_Louvert  Offline
BOC President; Pilot Extraordinaire; Humble Man
Senior Member

Joined: May 2012
Posts: 4,499
L'Etoile du Nord
.

'Freddy' for short.

.

#4546642 - 11/30/20 07:55 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: Nov 2014
Posts: 3,269
Fullofit Online content
Senior Member
Fullofit  Online Content
Senior Member

Joined: Nov 2014
Posts: 3,269
Ajax, ON
Thanks VonS, looks like I’ll stick with the current FM for now. Not worth mucking since Jasta 19 is about to get new machines soon-ish.

Lou, his controls weren’t “stuck”. He probably had a monumental Pinard-induced hangover and, as a matter of fact, he thought he was doing great.

30 November, 1917 07:45 morning mission
Saint-Loup-en-Champagne, Marne Sector
Jasta 19
Leutnant Zygmunt Dolf Hahn EK2 EK1 HHO PLM AO
93 confirmed kills
Awaiting two claim confirmations

The morning exercise consisted of balloon defence near Béntheniville.
It was difficult to sneak across the Front these days. Ziggy and the rest of his flight saw a pair of enemy aeroplanes trying to do just that, but were discovered early on by the Flak batteries. Hahn directed his Schwarm to intercept and he could tell one of the foes turned back immediately. The other one continued on, trusting in his luck. From his much higher altitude he dove on the Kette and soon was overwhelmed by the numbers. It was five against one, after all. The Strutter was soon damaged badly by Hahn and finished off by Scheller. The French machine ended in a steep spiralling dive with the engine catching on fire near the end of his destination.

YouTube Link



After circling the observation balloon for another ten minutes the flight returned back to base. Ziggy and the rest were already circling the aerodrome and entering the landing pattern when more Strutters appeared overhead. Zygmunt aborted his landing procedure immediately and began to climb. The French machines were looking to retaliate for their fallen comrade and were already diving on Hahn’s bus. He barely avoided crashing into one of them as it screamed by. Ziggy went after him and the vicious circle began. They danced around each other without either gaining any ground. Strutter kept his height advantage. Hahn continued to keep up. Finally Zygmunt banked the other way and disrupted Frenchman’s strategy. They both were soon diving with Ziggy on the Sopwith’s tail. He continued to fire until one of the Spandaus jammed. He could see the Strutter’s engine was in bad shape, coughing puffs of dark smoke. He aimed again and fired. The Strutter’s engine was now on fire and the kite was diving to crash into a field.
Zygmunt looked around to see another battle going on above. He quickly closed the distance and observed. He saw the Strutter hit by shrapnel and diving to get away, but Ziggy was on him. He was nearly hit by the observer in the rear of the French machine, but managed to dive under the Sopwith and out of field of fire. He then popped up and opened fire. His aim was true and the barrage was devastating. The Strutter dove immediately and crashed.
It was all over, the rest of the Schwarm was now reforming on Zygmunt’s flanks. He could see Schwarm Eins already landing at the aerodrome and then he saw another Strutter accompanied by Flak trying to get away. As luck would have it, the French plane was passing very close to Hahn’s flightpath and it would have been a shame not to take advantage of it. Ziggy’s Spandaus began to sing again and the Strutter started to lose altitude. He almost landed intact were it not for the trees in front of him. The machine barrelled through the woods and came out on the other side turned over and on fire.

YouTube Link



That was the last of them. This time for real. All remaining Albatrosen filed into a landing pattern and set down on the field.
Zygmunt filed three claims in addition to the two from yesterday still waiting for confirmation.

30 November, 1917 15:50 afternoon mission
Saint-Loup-en-Champagne, Marne Sector
Jasta 19
Leutnant Zygmunt Dolf Hahn EK2 EK1 HHO PLM AO
93 confirmed kills
Awaiting five claim confirmations

Ziggy’s second mission of the day was balloon busting near Sillery. The tenebrous clouds only intensified the dark feel of the inky sky on this dusk mission. By the time they were near the balloon the sun has set a while ago and it was only through sheer luck they were able to locate it. Hahn was the first to reach the gasbag. The muzzle flashes of his Spandaus blinded him momentarily. He pulled up without realizing how close he’d come to a collision. As he looked back he could see three black shapes descending in unison and firing at the balloon. It exploded into a brilliant fireball illuminating the nearest area with it’s incandescent brightness before darkness enveloped everything once again.

YouTube Link



They all returned back to base individually without attempting to form up for fear of a midair collision. Zygmunt could see somewhat darker swath of ground below, rough, foreboding. Small flickering lights could be seen here and there indicating fires soldiers had built to keep themselves warm. He continued to scan moonless sky and jumped at the shadows that his mind fabricated. He felt much more at ease once he crossed the silvery ribbon that was Aisne River. The fires were burning brightly in the old oil drums lining up the sides of the airfield. All Fliegers reached the safety of Saint-Loup without any incidents. The balloon was claimed by all three pilots of Hahn’s Schwarm but it was Tybelsky who was awarded the kill. The man definitely deserved it. They all did.
The news of Zygmunt’s confirmed claims arrived late in the evening. The two SPADs from yesterday and two Strutters from this morning were now his.

End of the Month Stats:

Leutnant Zygmunt Dolf Hahn EK2 EK1 HHO PLM AO
Jasta 19
Saint-Loup-en-Champagne, Marne Sector
Albatros D.V (Uprated)
180 missions
145.03 hrs
97 victories
164 claims


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4546747 - 12/01/20 07:42 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: Nov 2014
Posts: 3,269
Fullofit Online content
Senior Member
Fullofit  Online Content
Senior Member

Joined: Nov 2014
Posts: 3,269
Ajax, ON
1 December, 1917 07:45
Saint-Loup-en-Champagne, Marne Sector
Jasta 19
Leutnant Zygmunt Dolf Hahn EK2 EK1 HHO PLM AO
97 confirmed kills

Defence over Saint-Remy-le-Petit aerodrome.
Schwarm Eins arrived on station first. Ziggy could simply follow them to make his job that much easier. Suddenly the formation ahead started to break up and Hahn could see why. Another group of dots was approaching from the south. The two flights merged and one of the planes from enemy’s formation continued towards the aerodrome while its escort mixed it up with the planes from Schwarm Eins. Zygmunt led Schwarm Zwei towards the bomber, which was now being harassed by two or three Albatrosen from Schwarm Eins. Ziggy thought it was a Strutter, but as they closed the distance the machine looked much bigger. It had to be this new Breguet everyone was talking about. Either the pilot was outstanding or the large machine was that maneuverable, but it was not this easy to bring the beast down. Finally, Ziggy was able to set the bomber’s engine on fire and watch the two-seater go down. His wingmen continued to peck at the French plane all the way down to the ground where it crashed. The other Schwarm has already taken care of the escort, or driven them away. The two flights completed their patrol and returned home.

YouTube Link



"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4546762 - 12/01/20 10:02 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 7,588
Robert_Wiggins Online smile
BWOC Survivor!...So Far!!
Robert_Wiggins  Online Smile
BWOC Survivor!...So Far!!
Hotshot

Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 7,588
Lindsay, Ontario, Canada
Fullofit

The video of the night mission of the 30th Nov I susspect is rather darker than it appeared to you on your screen. Is that correct? I often remember what when I did vid captures, I would usually have to edit the vids to lighten them or the details would not be visible to the viewing audience. I never fifured out how to adjust the brightness within the video capture software.


(System_Specs)
Case: Cooler Master Storm Trooper
PSU: Ultra X3,1000-Watt
MB: Asus Maximus VI Extreme
Mem: Corsair Vengeance (2x 8GB), PC3-12800, DDR3-1600MHz, Unbuffered
CPU: Intel i7-4770K, OC to 4.427Ghz
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Seidon 240M Liquid CPU Cooler
Vid Card: ASUS GTX 980Ti STRIX 6GB
OS and Games on separate: Samsung 840 Series 250GB SSD
Monitor: Primary ASUS PG27AQ 4k; Secondary Samsung SyncMaster BX2450L
Periphs: MS Sidewinder FFB2 Pro, TrackIR 4

#4546771 - 12/02/20 12:04 AM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: Nov 2014
Posts: 3,269
Fullofit Online content
Senior Member
Fullofit  Online Content
Senior Member

Joined: Nov 2014
Posts: 3,269
Ajax, ON
Robert, that’s what it is. It looks just fine on my monitor, which means the brightness must be cranked up way too high. Maybe I should just take that video out. It is too dark to see (now that I look at it on my iPad). Perhaps leave it to the reader’s imagination instead - it’s most likely better than the video.


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4546772 - 12/02/20 12:44 AM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 7,588
Robert_Wiggins Online smile
BWOC Survivor!...So Far!!
Robert_Wiggins  Online Smile
BWOC Survivor!...So Far!!
Hotshot

Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 7,588
Lindsay, Ontario, Canada
Fullofit

Yeah I hate how that happens. I always expected the vid capture to be based on my screen settings, but that seems not to be the case, that is why I correct it using Corel Video Studio.

Best Regards


(System_Specs)
Case: Cooler Master Storm Trooper
PSU: Ultra X3,1000-Watt
MB: Asus Maximus VI Extreme
Mem: Corsair Vengeance (2x 8GB), PC3-12800, DDR3-1600MHz, Unbuffered
CPU: Intel i7-4770K, OC to 4.427Ghz
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Seidon 240M Liquid CPU Cooler
Vid Card: ASUS GTX 980Ti STRIX 6GB
OS and Games on separate: Samsung 840 Series 250GB SSD
Monitor: Primary ASUS PG27AQ 4k; Secondary Samsung SyncMaster BX2450L
Periphs: MS Sidewinder FFB2 Pro, TrackIR 4

#4546775 - 12/02/20 01:20 AM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 6,119
carrick58 Offline
Hotshot
carrick58  Offline
Hotshot

Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 6,119
Rupert Harkonen
Underofficer
Jasta 33
Wynghene, Flanders

Victory's: 4
Claims: 1

Dec 1, 1917.

Mixed it up with tommie s 2 flights. We spotted a flight of 5 Sopwith's below us and in a turn to the starboard, The Kette fuhrer waved to dive so down we went. As our 5 a/c dove I spotted 3 2 seat types to the left, but stayed on the fast turning and zooming e/a to the front. None for me although I did get off a few rds at one that shot pass as my wingman picked him off. Score 2 for 0 of us.

Attached Files CFS3 2020-12-01 16-55-03-99.jpgCFS3 2020-12-01 16-56-31-49.jpgCFS3 2020-12-01 16-54-49-18.jpg
Last edited by carrick58; 12/02/20 01:22 AM.
#4546781 - 12/02/20 01:37 AM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,955
Raine Offline
Member
Raine  Offline
Member

Joined: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,955
New Brunswick, Canada
Month-End Stats

Oberleutnant Hans-Dieter Vogel (KIA)

Pour le Merite, Hohenzollern House Order, EK1, EK2, Hanseatic Cross (Bremen)
Jasta 12, Phalempin, France
152 missions
95.38 hours
69 kills
142 claims

Flight Sublieutenant George Ewan MacAlister

8 Squadron, Royal Naval Air Service
Mont-St-Eloi, France
13 missions
8.52 hours
12 kills
15 claims

#4546791 - 12/02/20 03:13 AM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,955
Raine Offline
Member
Raine  Offline
Member

Joined: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,955
New Brunswick, Canada
Fullofit – Ziggy is set to surpass Mulberry at the pace he is going. I loved your video of downing the Breguet!
Carrick – congratulations on victory number four for Rupert. He is really finding his feet in that Albatros!


War Journal of Flight Sub-Lieutenant George Ewan MacAlister

8 Squadron, RNAS

Mont-St-Eloi, France

Part 3


[Linked Image]
"My next burst, a long one, caused the German machine to come apart in the air."

28 November 1917 – Wednesday. I find myself struggling to remember the day of the week. One day is much like the next, and with the big push we have been flying constantly. A few days ago it seemed that we were going to break through at Cambrai. Our attack there was a massive surprise. Unlike every other offensive, this one did not begin with days of bombardment. The artillery put on a crashing show for a few hours and then we let loose more than a hundred tanks. The great steel monsters slithered across no man’s land and set the Huns to flight. McDonald told me that he even saw mounted cavalry moving up through our rear lines. The weather grounded us for a couple of days at the start of the offensive and then we were pressed into action. As we are located well to the north of Cambrai, we patrolled this side of the main attack. That probably spared us a few weeks of ground support. Ground support does not sound like fun – it consists mainly of flying at treetop level above the Hun lines with every German on the Western front taking pot shots. Now the attack has stalled and the enemy is regrouping. The great minds at headquarters seem to have forgotten to lay on reserves to exploit their win. I suppose it can be forgiven since they are not very used to winning.

I could get cynical but it wouldn’t do any good.

In the morning we were to patrol the lines east of Arras and a little south. The Huns had a different idea. No sooner had begun to take off than we heard the clanging of our ship’s bell over the din of engines. A large group of Albatri were diving on us out of the sun. I’d seen these fellows before. Their machines were painted deep blue with scarlet noses. I was the second machine off the ground behind Compston. The Huns passed over the two of us and I was able to turn about and get on the tail of the rearmost Albatros. Those lovely twin Vickers guns tore the Hun machine apart and it fell on the eastern fringe of the field. We chased after the others, but they had no spirit left after that first pass. We landed to replenish ammunition and the skipper sent another flight in our place so we had the morning off. My Albatros was easily confirmed, bringing my bag up to ten Huns in the week I have been with the squadron. I am convinced that this success is mainly a matter of luck. Like today, in many of the scraps I have had the good fortune to be just in the right place to get behind an enemy machine. If you can do that and are close enough, the rest is pure mechanics.

In the afternoon we patrolled the lines south of Arras, much as we were intending to do in the morning. Towards the end of our time we scrapped with a few Albatri with no losses on either side.

Thursday 29 November was a frustrating day. Our morning patrol was led by Flight Lieutenant Day. We stayed low over the enemy lines – far too low, in my opinion. On three different occasions, my machine was holed by ground fire. And on the third such occasion, a near miss by Archie threw my machine over on its side. I smelt petrol and found my feet awash in the stuff! That is most disconcerting. I switched off and planed across the lines to land at our aerodrome at Lechelles.

In the afternoon we took Cooper bombs and headed down to entertain the Hun aerodrome at Riencourt. Unfortunately, I never saw the place. The Clerget decided to go on strike just as we reached the enemy lines and once again I had to glide home, this time putting down at our aerodrome at Courcelles.

At lunch this day, Squadron Commander Draper apologised to me for not getting a chance to celebrate the six Huns bagged on Tuesday. We had swilled some champagne in the wardroom that evening but the planned dinner had been put off because of the pace of operations and the need to keep clear heads. He said he’d make it up as soon as we had a breather. He confirmed that he had sent a telegram to General Trenchard who was most impressed and responded this morning, conveying his congratulations. Unfortunately, the General has been called away to London and is unable to visit us.

That evening I got permission to wander into the village of Mont-St-Eloi along with my cabin mates, White, Holmes, and Sneath. The village was very pretty, not yet badly scarred by war. It stood on the side of a hill, unusual in that flat place. The people were friendly and smiled and laughed while they charged you double for anything they had. White knew of a good little café where one could get omelettes and chips with decent red wine in clay jugs. The woman who ran the place and who seem to own it was a somewhat heavy farmer’s wife of unfortunate countenance. White, ever the charming Canadian, had christened her Hairy Legs, a name he used even to her face. She replied by slapping the back of his head but seem to enjoy his attentions.

“She’s wearing stockings tonight,” said White. “I dare you to look at her legs on a full stomach if she isn’t wearing them.” We each tried our schoolboy French on her, complementing the food and wine and her hospitality. She smiled stiffly at us. White had a better handle on the language and propositioned her most indecently. She tousled his hair and called him “Mon chou.” It means “cabbage”, and is apparently a Good Thing. Funny people, the French.

Friday was a cloudy day. We were once again ordered to shoot up Riencourt. This time the Cooper bombs were left at home. They are being conserved in case we need them down close to Cambrai. We flew south past Arras and then made a direct line for Riencourt. Flight Lieutenant Day was leading and he brought as well to the east of the Hun aerodrome so that we could attack it from that direction. Several machines were lined up on the field. As we began our approach I noticed a lone Albatros lining up to land. I got behind him and chased him about at treetop level for a bit before I was able to get a decent shot away. The machine knows down and crashed just west of the field. It was confirmed by Williams – number 11.

That afternoon we suddenly were ordered to take the Cooper bombs we had been denied in the morning and attack a German rail siding over the lines north of Monchy. Flight Lieutenant Munday took us on a route that had us approach the target from the south. When it was only two or three miles off, Munday fired a red Very light, which was our signal for enemy in sight. A large formation of Albatri were diving on us. For several seconds I thought I might be able to reach the railyard and release my bombs there, but the Huns two quick. I had to let the bombs go prematurely in order to defend myself. It was a jolly scrap with some seriously determined Huns. One after another, either a Camel or an Albatros would break away and head home nursing damage or jammed guns. I soon found myself alone in Hunland and set course for home. That was when I saw in the distance a green Albatros stalking one of our own machines. I raced after it at full throttle. The Hun must have opened fire because the Camel he was chasing – it turned out to be White’s – turned to meet him, which gave me a chance to catch up. After a short fight, I put a few rounds into the Albatros and slipped behind him. My next burst, a long one, caused the German machine to come apart in the air. White was more than happy to confirm this as victory number 12.

Attached Files Kill 12.jpg
Last edited by Raine; 12/02/20 05:31 AM.
#4546820 - 12/02/20 01:41 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 4,499
RAF_Louvert Offline
BOC President; Pilot Extraordinaire; Humble Man
RAF_Louvert  Offline
BOC President; Pilot Extraordinaire; Humble Man
Senior Member

Joined: May 2012
Posts: 4,499
L'Etoile du Nord
.

Raine - MacAlister seems an unstoppable force, a dozen confirmed and he’s barely past his first week at the front. Amazing stuff! If his luck holds and he continues such a pace he will take the title of leading ace by the new year.

Carrick - Rupert didn’t score in that last outing, eh? Perhaps he’s having a bit too much fun at the Gardens.

Fullofit - Who would have guessed a bus a large as the Bréguet could be that agile. Ziggy stalked it though like the master he is. Outstanding the way he hung below it and blocked the G/O’s view while he got himself into position to strike. And 97 confirmed? Yikes! To that night video, I was able to watch it by shutting off all the lights in the room and turning up the brightness on my monitor to 100%. As Robert noted, increasing brightness on the recording before saving it would make it more viewable and closer to what you’re seeing.

.

2 December 1917
65 Squadron R.F.C.
Bailleul, France

The new month started as the old one had ended, with gales on the 1st along with intermittent torrents of rain. The squadron had only been able to put up patrols at dawn while the breeze was lighter, but by the time the flights returned some ninety minutes or so later they were clawing their way home against horrid headwinds. This morning however was starting out with clearing skies and no wind at all. Just before first light Captain Abbott lead ‘B’ Flight on a patrol of the lines down to Lens. All was serene and quiet until they approached the broken remains of the city where Frederick caught sight of a lone Hannover some thousand feet above them. He climbed up beneath it cautiously and while still some 200 yards out he pulled up the nose of his Camel and let loose with the Vickers. The bullets ripped through the underside of the fuselage and engine and the Hun plane immediately rolled to starboard and dove on its attacker. Abbott quickly got onto the enemy’s six and as he did so he could see the Boche observer hammering wildly on his guns - they were jammed! The King’s ace took quick and full advantage of the situation, closing the gap and firing another hundred-and-fifty rounds into the Hun bus, at which point its top portside wing tore away. The Captain watched as the craft spiraled down helplessly to the mud below. No other EA were found, and by the time ‘B’ Flight turned towards the north-northwest to return home they were once again fighting a fierce gale out of the west. Why did the winds always seem to favour the Huns?

[Linked Image]

.

#4546874 - 12/02/20 07:07 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: Nov 2014
Posts: 3,269
Fullofit Online content
Senior Member
Fullofit  Online Content
Senior Member

Joined: Nov 2014
Posts: 3,269
Ajax, ON
Raine, thanks, that Breguet was a handful.
That is one scary looking picture. It’s like a canon round went through the middle of the airplane leaving only wings, like a swatted fly. So, George averages a kill per mission. That is a nice ratio. Well done on the last two claims.

Robert and Lou, I’ll have to keep this in mind next time Ziggy flies a late evening mission.
As to the Breguet, it surprised me with its agility and prowess. I wonder if the pilot knows it’s not a Nieuport?
That’s a lovely Hun-shot-down-by-the-sunrise pic, Lou. What is it with this shoddy German workmanship and those wings coming off left and right? Congrats on another victory. Where is the Gong Fairy?

2 December, 1917 09:45
Saint-Loup-en-Champagne, Marne Sector
Jasta 19
Leutnant Zygmunt Dolf Hahn EK2 EK1 HHO PLM AO
97 confirmed kills

For once Ziggy didn’t complain the mission was uneventful. With a crazy month behind him, he didn’t mind patrolling over Leffincourt aerodrome without seeing any action. A little rest would do him some good.


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4546915 - 12/03/20 02:28 AM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 6,119
carrick58 Offline
Hotshot
carrick58  Offline
Hotshot

Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 6,119
Rupert Harkonen
Underofficer
Jasta 33
Wynghene, Flanders

Victory's: 4
Claims: 1


Dec 2, 1917.

Barrage Patrol Last Light at less than 800 meters. What a nerve racker. I made it to the final Way point then lost my flight . 7 Albatross a/c just vanished in the darkness. After stalling and almost getting into a spin, I just put into a friendly AF that Had Flares out.

Attached Files CFS3 2020-12-02 18-14-14-89.jpgCFS3 2020-12-02 18-17-10-15.jpg
#4546916 - 12/03/20 02:32 AM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 6,119
carrick58 Offline
Hotshot
carrick58  Offline
Hotshot

Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 6,119
RAF and Raine: The Sopwith is a handful I get close ,but no See-Gar Rats !

#4546946 - 12/03/20 12:23 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 319
Wulfe Offline
Member
Wulfe  Offline
Member

Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 319
Afternoon, Gents! Been a while! Real life caught up with me, but I'm hoping to get back into it now that things are simmering down a little. Allow me to introduce the new chap - Sergent William Denton Grey of Escadrille SPA.31!

A Sky Torn Asunder: The Memoirs of William Denton Grey.

Part 1: Arrival.



It was late on the evening of December 2nd that I arrived in the sleepy town of Chateau-Thierry and was greeted on the cold station platform by Pierre, the stocky, dark-haired chauffeur of Spad 31. I had been pleasantly surprised when, upon recognising me as an American as we introduced ourselves, the little Chauffeur had seamlessly transitioned into speaking English. “We had an Americain like yourself before, you know,” he had told me as we stepped into a rusted and dented Fiat. “Is that right?” I responded hopefully. My French was poor at best, and I had longed to hear another American voice since my arrival into the country. “Oui, mon ami”, he replied, “but he was killed in 1916. It was a shame, he was well liked”. My spirits sank.

Pierre liked to talk. During a fast and reckless drive through the French countryside, which, even as a newly-brevetted Chasse pilot made my stomach turn, he incessantly questioned me about where I was from, how long I had been a Pilot, if I had been in my first air fight, and so forth. Through politeness I did my utmost to answer his barrage of questions. Eventually we arrived at the aerodrome near Fere-en-Tardenois, the home of Groupe de Combat 11.

“And here we are, Mon ami!” Pierre stated as the car groaned and jolted onto the aerodrome. “Notre Maison! I’ll show you to your quarters”. As we stepped out of the car I lit a cigarette, the heat of the match offering some minute comfort against the December night chill. “Shouldn't I report to the Capitane?” I asked. Pierre waved the question away with a chuckle. “Certainly not! Capitane Dupoy has long since gone to bed, and you’ll not be in his good books if you wake him! But, he knows you were to arrive today or tomorrow, so I'm sure you will meet soon”.

I followed Pierre past the gently-rippling Bessoneaux towards the dark silhouettes of the typical Adrian barracks, which seemed to decorate every camp short of the frontlines across the whole of France. As we walked, he explained that Escadrille 31 shared the aerodrome with the three other Escadrilles of Groupe de Combat 11. With some ninety or so men per Escadrille, it made for quite the community. “That’s the pilot's barracks of Escadrille 57 over there. The next one after that belongs to Escadrille 12. And this one here is where you’ll be staying” Pierre explained, coming to a halt. “Now, keep your voice down when we go in. Les Pilotes have had a long day”. Carefully, Pierre swung the barracks door open and we stepped into a low-ceilinged room, dimly lit by an oil lantern which gently swung above a mess table in the centre. Against the far wall stood a small stove, and dotted here and there were various chairs and stools. Beside the door, a figure stirred in a military cot and slowly heaved itself up.

Est-ce vous, Pierre?” a voice asked quietly in the dimness. “Oui. Je suis avec le nouveau pilote” answered the chauffeur, before turning to me. “This is Georges, your Orderly” he explained. As the blanket slipped to reveal the figure rising beneath it, I saw that he was perhaps forty, with faint laugh-lines around his coarse face. Despite his kindly, aged appearance, his ice-blue eyes had retained a fierce youth. He ran a hand through his jet-black hair before slowly bringing himself to stand. As he did, Pierre patted me on the back. “Welcome to Escadrille 31. Georges will take care of you from here, I’m going to go and get some sleep”. I thanked the Chauffeur, who gave me a wink before slipping out into the night.

Georges led me through a doorway at the side of the mess hall, and into a long, narrow corridor that ran down the side of the barracks. Even through the darkness I could see that he walked with a harsh limp. I wondered if he had been a Poilu. After passing two doors, Georges stepped into a small room, taking much care to open the door as quietly as possible whilst motioning with a finger pressed against his lips for me to remain silent. The room was small, with two military cots pressed close together, separated only by a small washbasin. A figure stirred in the leftmost cot, but the rightmost one remained empty. “This is where you will stay,” Georges whispered. “The Pilotes get up at 6 A.M”. I thanked the orderly, who nodded once before limping out the room and pulling the door shut with a faint ‘click’ behind him. Undressing, I stored my duffle bag underneath the empty cot and slid into it, pulling the covers over my head. My mind was racing at the prospect of finally going out over the front for the first time, and buzzing with thoughts of aerial battles atop the clouds.

Eventually, in the early hours of morning, I sunk into sleep.




-----------------------------------


Part 2: A Day of Firsts.

The next day I was abruptly shaken awake by a hand gripping tight to my shoulder. Groaning slightly, I pulled the covers from over my head and peered up into the youthful, rouged face of a pilot, the faint hints of an attempted moustache shadowing his lip. “Là! Là! Essayez-vous de dormir pendant la guerre?” he asked me with an amused smirk on his face. Bleary-eyed, I sat up. “Oh, er, Désolé, mon français..c’est n'est pas très bon.” I mumbled, and the pilot looked at me, bewildered. “You are not French?” he asked in a heavily accented English. I shook my head. “American”. The pilot’s face lit up. “Ah! Well, American, you need to get out of bed, or we will be late for patrol!”.

I rushed to pull on my uniform, as my room-mate lit a cigarette and patiently waited. Once I was ready, we stepped out into the hallway and went towards the mess. “I’m Davet, by the way. Davet Amette”. We shook hands. “Nice to meet you, Davet. I'm Bill Grey,”. We stepped into the mess, which was now filled with blue-clad pilots, smoking and chattering around the mess table. As we shuffled into view, the pilots glanced our way. At the head of the table was an older-looking pilot, his cap failing to mask a receding hairline. His deep-set gaze swept over me with faint curiosity.

Est-il le nouveau pilote?” he asked Davet.
Oui. Un Americain”.

The older pilot nodded. “Tu parles français?” he then asked me. “Un peu” I answered honestly. The older pilot smiled slightly. I was relieved when he continued the conversation in English.

“What’s your name?” he asked.

“Grey. Bill Grey”.

“Well, Monsieur Grey, Le Capitaine has asked me to show you around the neighbourhood today. We’re going up at nine O’Clock. Have you been in your first scrap yet?”

“Uh, no. I haven’t been over the front yet”.

The pilot’s eyes widened. “Lá! Lá! They sent you straight here from the schools? In that case, I want you to stay close when we’re in the air! If we get into a fight and you get into trouble, dive away. Our Coucous are much faster in a dive than the Bosche ones”.

I was invited to sit down at the mess table, and over a hastily-eaten breakfast I got to know the pilots of my new Escadrille. The older pilot at the head of the table was Adjutant Georges Ortoli, who had been with the Escadrille since 1915 and had officially brought down eleven Bosches - the most of any of the Escadrille's pilots. Another old hand was Sergent Chartoire, who had been a Poilu since 1914 before eventually transferring to the Air Service. He’d arrived just three months prior to me.

Caporal Blanc was altogether the opposite of what comes to mind when you think of an air fighter. The portly, overweight pilot looked more of an aristocrat than a soldier as he lounged backwards in his chair, his legs crossed and a cigarette clasped in his large, ring-adorned hands. An air fighter he was, though, and he had five Bosches to prove it, as he was eager to tell me.

Beside Blanc sat Adjutant Leguene, another slightly older pilot who seemed perpetually lost in some faraway memory. Our introductions were brief. Caporal Bordage, an incredibly youthful-looking pilot with brilliant Gallic red hair and freckles underneath his almond-eyes, headed the opposite end of the table. Bordage seemed, both in appearance and mannerism, less mature than the others, and frighteningly fragile. I wondered if he, too, had recently arrived from the schools, but I thought it would be impolite to ask.

After finishing breakfast, Davet approached me again. “So, then! Would you like to see your machine? The mechanics will be readying it on the field”. Eagerly I accepted, and we stepped out into a perfectly crisp, chill December morning. As I followed Davet towards Escadrille 31’s hangars he would offer the occasional greeting to pilots of other Escadrilles, and I would briefly be introduced: “Ceci est notre nouveau pilote. Il est américain!”. On the aerodrome sat four beautifully sleek machines, their light cream fuselages and wings glowing in the sun. They were Spads - two of the older 180 Horsepower type, and two of the new type with 200 Horsepower and two machine-guns. I felt a sudden pride as Davet pointed out my machine to me (it was the older type), and a rush of excitement as I saw the Vickers machine gun resting quietly atop the engine deck. On its side, the striking image of a Greek Archer, its bow drawn taught and facing forwards, was painted in bold black. This was the insignia of Escadrille 31, and all the machines of the Escadrille bore it.

“Ortoli picked this one out for you last week. He always gets us the best Coucous in the depot. This one has a Hispano-Hispano!” Davet told me, grinning. During my Spad training at the G.D.E I had learned that, owing to the great demand of these machines, many different companies built Spad airframes and the Hispano engines that powered them, but it was favourable to have an airframe from the Spad factory or an engine from the Hispano factory, as these were thought to be of the best quality. If a pilot was exceptionally lucky, they might even get their hands on a ‘Hispano-Hispano Spad-Spad’ - the rarest and most reliable machine a pilot could have.

As I marveled at my new machine, Davet waved to a mechanic as he emerged from the Bessoneau. “Morning, Souris! Care to meet your new pilote?”. The mechanic looked over at me, lazily. Like Bordage, he was shockingly young and frail looking. Despite this, Davet told me that the boy was my Chief Mechanic, that there was no finer aeroplane mechanic in all of France and that he’d been with the Escadrille since 1916. This seemed incredible to me, as Souris seemed not a day older than sixteen. I was also introduced to my First Assistant, Felix. I hid my amusement at the fact that the man appeared at least five years the senior of the boy he was ‘assisting’. Both of the mechanics grunted a hello, warned me not to damage their Spad, and promptly turned back to their work.

Finally the time came for our patrol, and I felt another surge of pride as I saw my Spad awaiting me. The machines at Avord and the G.D.E had been shared between every pupil, but here was a ship which was mines alone. Ortoli gathered us - the other pilots on patrol being Covin and Bordage, and gave us our instructions.

“We’re going to take it easy today, and only go over to Cramaille so that Grey can see the landmarks”. I tried to hide my disappointment, which the Adjutant picked up on, flashing me a knowing grin. “Maybe tomorrow we’ll visit Germany. There’s no rush, mon ami”.

With that we were into our machines, and I couldn’t help but grin at the sound of my Hispano-Hispano purring over smoothly. Ortoli gave the signal and then shot out ahead down the field. The other Spads followed one by one, and soon the ground was rushing beneath me, and falling away as I climbed up towards the sky.

Our Spads shimmered in the sunlight as we danced among the clouds, keeping a loose, easy formation and not climbing too high. Between glancing at Ortoli’s and Bordage’s Spads, I scanned the ground and tried to commit the shape of the fields and forests to memory. It didn’t take us long to reach Cramaille, over which we made one pass before curving around to return home. It was then that Ortoli rocked his wings, and gestured for us to climb. Puzzled, I followed as our four Spads ascended, slowly corkscrewing ever-upwards. Without any warning, Ortoli suddenly flicked his Spad onto its back and dove straight down at an incredible speed. At the same time, Bordage turned sharply to the right, and Covin followed. Confused, I turned with them, but in a flash they were gone, and I suddenly couldn’t see another machine in the sky.

When I next saw my fellow pilots, they were dancing and looping some distance below me. I was impressed by their stunting. Perhaps this is a tradition of theirs to have some fun at the end of a patrol, I mused. I flew along, peering down at the display, before glancing to my right. Flying beside me was an aeroplane, but not a Spad. Its fuselage was cigar-like, and wooden. Suddenly I spotted, in bold black on the fuselage side, an Iron Cross. A Bosche! For a moment I was simply stunned, as the enemy aeroplane continued on, quite as unaware of me as I had been of it, but then I snapped to my senses. Cautiously I backed off the throttle and slid behind the German, slowly and carefully lining up my sights. To my amazement, the Bosche remained unaware. I edged closer - and then pressed down on the trigger, firing a long burst and watching as the wooden fuselage of the enemy plane splintered and cracked. Almost as if slowly waking from a sleep, the German plane slowly pulled up before rolling onto its side and beginning a lazy spiral towards earth. I followed, but before I could get my sights on the Bosche again there was a sudden flash and the machine was instantaneously swallowed by flames. I watched as the German aeroplane’s spiral became more severe - and then its wings folded and it fell, burning like a comet, to the cold earth below.

I returned to the aerodrome, both stunned and greatly excited by the experience. As I entered the mess, I found my fellow pilots chattering feverishly with wild excitement of their own.

“...But I have never seen Bosches so far into our side!”
“They must have been protecting those Biplaces!”
“Did you see me get that Albatros? I swear to you I saw him crash!”

Bemused, I sat down at the end of the table. “What Bosches? I only saw one” I asked. Ortoli seemed almost surprised at the statement. “Merde, Grey! I’d forgotten you were with us! We were attacked by a gang of Albatroses, but we gave them a rough time!”. It suddenly clicked that the ‘stunting' I had witnessed had been my fellow pilots, locked in aerial battle! “I didn’t even realise,” I said, feeling quite the fool for my ignorance, “but I caught the Bosche I saw by surprise. I shot him and he caught fire and crashed”. Bordage’s eyes widened. “! That was you? I saw that Albatros catch fire! But, you must claim him, Grey! A Bosche in your very first flight! C’est incroyable!

At once I was rushed by the pilots to write my report, which I nervously took to Capitane Dupont’s office, which sat in a wooden hut beside the Escadrille’s barracks. After knocking and being given permission to enter, I stepped into a cozy, well-furnished office, warmed by the low embers of a fireplace. Behind an ornate oak desk sat the Capitane. His face was sharp and serious. A thin, violently-trimmed moustache sat below his curved nose, upon which was a pair of perfectly rounded spectacles. Behind the glint of the lenses two deep brown eyes pierced through me. “Yes?” the Capitane barked, and nervously I saluted, before handing him my combat report. He took it and laid it flat on the desk. “You’re the new pilot?” he asked. I nodded. “Oui, Capitane”. He raised an eyebrow as I spoke. “Americain” he stated to himself under his breath, before turning back to the report. “A Bosche Monoplace shot down in flames, you say? Only just East of Cramaille, no less? I understand you’ve come to us straight from the Schools”. He paused for a moment, shaking his head. “Tell me, am I really to believe this claim?”.

I was taken aback and somewhat offended, but I had the sense not to retaliate. “Sir, it was seen by Caporal Bordage” I answered, and the Capitane’s expression hardened. “And he’ll confirm that?” he asked testily. I replied yes. “Hm. Well, get him to hand in a report, and if that is the case then I will see if I can find out where your Bosche landed”. I thanked the Capitane and saluted again before being dismissed.

Later that evening, I felt complete exhaustion. The day had seemed like one long, surreal dream. I was disheartened when Georges informed me that night that my Bosche could not be confirmed, but my spirits were lifted by my fellow pilots, who told me over dinner that this was the case more often than not.

Again that night I found myself restless, unable to fall asleep.


Last edited by Wulfe; 12/03/20 02:22 PM.
#4546974 - 12/03/20 03:36 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 4,499
RAF_Louvert Offline
BOC President; Pilot Extraordinaire; Humble Man
RAF_Louvert  Offline
BOC President; Pilot Extraordinaire; Humble Man
Senior Member

Joined: May 2012
Posts: 4,499
L'Etoile du Nord
.

Wulfe - Great to have you back! A brilliant introduction and start to Sergent Grey's career, which we all hope will be a long and illustrious one. Wonderful writing, full of color and flavor. And a Boche on his first outing! Despite no confirmation it is still a fine achievement. I look forward to the next episode with much anticipation.

.


3 December 1917
65 Squadron R.F.C.
Bailleul, France

Another dawn sortie for Freddy and the boys. Light winds and cloud-dotted skies made for fine, albeit very cold, flying weather.


'B' Flight up and away before the sun. A British searchlight crew on the south edge of Ypres attempts to locate Captain Abbott's team in the darkness, thinking them to be the enemy.
[Linked Image]

The eastern horizon glows orange as the King's airmen reach their patrol area above Menen.
[Linked Image]

After twenty minutes of scanning the brightening skies Frederick catches sight of two DFWs crossing his path. He makes a slashing attack on the leading Hun bus.
[Linked Image]

The enemy two-seater catches fire, but not before the Boche gunner manages to place a few rounds into Abbott's engine. The Captain is forced to drop out of the fight and nurse his now clattering mount westward while the rest of 'B' Flight takes care of the second DFW.
[Linked Image]

Fortunately Frederick has enough altitude, and the Clerget hangs on long enough, to get him back to the Asylum where he glides in safely. Report filed, claim submitted, and it's off to brekkers to wait for the rest of his team to return home.
[Linked Image]

.

Page 240 of 259 1 2 238 239 240 241 242 258 259

Moderated by  Polovski 

Quick Search
Recent Articles
Support SimHQ

If you shop on Amazon use this Amazon link to support SimHQ
.
Social


Recent Topics
Where are you from? test
by NoFlyBoy. 02/28/21 03:51 AM
British Army cooks 1960
by PanzerMeyer. 02/28/21 12:47 AM
Join me my brothers and sisters.
by NoFlyBoy. 02/26/21 02:34 PM
The Battle of Verdun Lego style
by PanzerMeyer. 02/25/21 07:53 PM
Dinossaurs tv show behind the scenes
by Blade_RJ. 02/25/21 07:13 PM
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.6.0