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#4515552 - 04/09/20 07:55 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) ***** [Re: Raine]  
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Ajax, ON
He missed you? Unbelievable. Too bad he ain’t a Hun!


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4515555 - 04/09/20 08:01 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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L'Etoile du Nord
.

word

.

#4515562 - 04/09/20 08:28 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Riane,

So sorry to hear about Capt. Collins. One-huindred plus episodes and done in by the trifecta of a railroad attack, heavy clouds (sorry), and collision with a squad-mate. The fates were lined up against you, I tell ya! Perhaps heaven was feeling the need of a vintner' and Collins was the only one available.

Salute!

#4515577 - 04/09/20 11:24 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Lou, by George, we Huns all need to park our machines and let you folks take out each other! I have lost way to many pilots to collision. Glad you made it down safe. Ganz’s total now is 15

Epower, thank you for your concern Sir! Ganz is good to go. He’s just had a rough time since returning with the big push on and all those enemy craft in the air.

I read the Baron lay his head on the table and displayed his wound somewhere. I think this is unproven though. But, if it’s good enough for the Baron, it’s good enough for Ganz.


Never approach a bull from the front, a horse from the rear or a fool from either end.
BOC Member since....I can't remember!
#4515579 - 04/09/20 11:40 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: RAF_Louvert]  
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Originally Posted by RAF_Louvert
.

Well I don't feel slighted.

No respect, no respect at all I tell ya. I wrote a story, sent it to a publisher. He said, "Did you write this?" I said, "Yeah, yeah I did". He said, "Don't do it again."

No respect...

biggrin
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That's very funny. Somewhere Rodney is smiling.

Right above my post too. Grinding on Oliver's catchup though some part of me wants to start at page one of this extraordinary thread and read it slowly. Time for that later. Mea Culpa.
[Linked Image]

So sad about Swanny losing his pal. Like when Cecil Lewis came back to find his best friend Arthur Rhys-Davids gone.

Last edited by epower; 04/10/20 12:16 AM.
#4515590 - 04/10/20 02:23 AM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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27 March 1917, Boulogne-sur-Mer, France

On my way. Train to St. Omer tomorrow but for now I wait out the night in the most wretched hotel. I’ve seen cleaner bilges than this place. 1917 passes quickly. January especially was a blur. More flying days than December helped make up for lost time. Reams of flight notes from Upavon. I was quite the pest, always badgering the instructors with yet more questions. By the end, I think they were glad to see me moving on.

________________________________________________________________________

3 January 1917 - Central Flying School, Upavon

More acrobatics and stunts these first days of 1917. What a thrill to go looping, climbing, diving, and rolling about the Winter sky. I’m making ever sharper turns, some level, others climbing or diving. I want to learn how tightly I can turn each machine, but I can’t allow a stall. I fear spinning because I’m uncertain how best to recover from one. I have a strong hunch, but doubts remain, so I hold back. Maddening!

Alas, the instructors, while proven combat pilots, know very little about the science of aeronautics. What’s more confusing are their differing opinions about spins. I’ve asked every man jack among them about escaping a spin. Let go of all controls? Pull at the controls strongly and kick rudder back and forth? Try and point he nose at the ground and pick up speed? The one answer in common is, “best to avoid a stall so you keep out of a spin altogether.” Lt. Strugnell has an intriguing theory that goes against all instinct but it might work.

Why is this a mystery?. Someone must have studied the science behind aeroplane flight, stalls and spins and written it down! The technical notes the Ack Ems use discourse at length about rigging and engines, but say nothing as to why an aeroplane behaves as it does. Perhaps those at the Royal Aircraft Factory have that knowledge, but if they do, it has yet to reach Upavon.

15 January 1917
A letter from Eliza, after all these months. I took her silence as a sign, and thought my Christmas card more of a valedictory but…

[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]

My God. What she’s been through.

When we met, I knew the bubbly girl with the infectious smile and laughing eyes to be modern and independent under it all. That was obvious from the start. She’s got some real iron though.
What does she mean revealing such dark and intimate thoughts to me? Dare I hope?

17 January 1917
I cannot write. My mind swims. Eliza! How the thought of her invades my every idle moment. No more of this diary! I must focus on the aeroplanes, or I will run mad.

30 January 1917
It was there the whole time, but I couldn’t recognize it until now.
As when a close-hauled schooner, approaching the eye of the wind, subtly alters the vibration of her rigging and the sound of water passing along the hull, so too the aeroplane changes her voice. I am learning how to listen and feel. Steep climbing turn, tighter and tighter. Have I enough airspeed? Maybe. Almost there but she doesn’t like it. Hold. Hold. She’s really griping now, wires hissing, struts creaking in irritation, stick loosening, wallowing and … departure!

It finally happened. The other day I got cocky and pushed way too far, stalled violently, and spun. My shoulder slammed against the cockpit coaming. In terror, I levered myself back to where I could reach all the controls. I’m going to die! Then without thought or conscious action I was heading nose down toward the ground. Simple to counter the roll and pull gently out of the dive. What the hell just happened!? What did I do? I’m alive. Stop shaking. I must try this again!

Of course, now it was all I could do to get the machine to stall. My muscles refused all instruction. Dammit, Oliver! Find your courage. Snap! Into the Maelstrom. Around and around. Idle the engine, center stick, opposite rudder, now push the nose down. Strugnell was right! Again and again now… and recover. Dizzy. Time to go home.

4 February 1917
The mess this evening is buzzing with the news. Yesterday, President Wilson severed diplomatic relations with Germany and announced the same to Congress. Just 3 days after the Kaiser resumed unrestricted submarine warfare. It won’t be long now. American entry seems inevitable. Celebrations all around.
Lt. Strugnell has orders for France. We toasted him repeatedly that night. I am forever grateful for all his help.

9 February 1917
It’s past midnight so I guess it’s the 10th. I’m wide awake still but the 3rd whiskey has done the trick, and I’m finally starting to calm down. Tonight, I passed my final hurdle here at CFS and one I had approached with some trepidation. The last long cross-country flight at night. The previous ones were shorter hops and came off without incident but tonight there was only a thin crescent of moon. Thankfully, Dreary Olde England thoughtfully provided some snow on the ground. I could see just enough. Hail Britannia! I’ve never been so relieved as when the field pots of Upavon welcomed me home at last. Let’s hope I never have to do that again.

Orders came today. “You will report on the fourteenth to the School of Aerial Gunnery at Hythe...” Two weeks of training. Mike and Tom will be coming along as well.

20 February 1917
Guns! Guns! Guns! Time in the butts learning the basics, then diving on the giant chalk that represents an enemy a/c. I wish we could fire more rounds from the air, but even so, I think I’m getting the hang of this. Hopefully I’ll get orders for scouts. Straight and level in a 2-seater is not for me!
A letter from Eliza. I see I shall have little sleep tonight.

21 February 1917
Terrible accident today. Mike misjudged his firing pass and nipped the ground with his undercarriage. When he landed the machine collapsed under him and then pitchpoled. Thankfully he survived but broke his nose and his right arm so he’ll be laid up for awhile.

26 February 1917
Laconia was torpedoed off Fastnet and sunk! 12 dead, nothing like Lusitania but 6 were Americans. Poor devils in the engine room took a direct hit from the second torpedo. Huge headline in the Times. I can only imagine what the papers look like back home.

28 February 1917
Orders for Gosport and specialized instruction. I’ve made good use of my time here although I’m still over-correcting with the rudder bar and spraying a bit. There’s something dark and terribly satisfying about firing off the guns.

9 March 1917 - Gosport Aerodrome, England

What a joy it is to fly more up to date machines! Flying in formation, in such close proximity to other aircraft is something altogether different. I must be alert and on my guard at all times. This first week the Bristol scout and DH5 are my mounts. So much more powerful than the Avro and B.E. There are Sopwith Pups here too. Oh, to have a chance at those.

14 March, 1917
Tom is off to France, by way of Farmborough. From there he’ll ferry a plane over to St. Omer. We’ve’ only been here 12 days and specialized training is supposed to last 4 weeks, but there is a growing need for replacement pilots. We gave him a right proper send off in the mess. He’s my best friend here and we completed our entire training together. I will miss him greatly.

15 March 1917
Beware the Ides of March, but perhaps not today. I flew the Sopwith Pup for the first time. So light and agile. She climbs like a lift and turns very well. Better than any Hun machine now flying I’m told. She’s quite talkative as well especially near the stall. Light weight comes at a price however. Captain Johnson-Smythe was most explicit about speed in a dive and the need for a gentle pullout of same. Much of his instructions are quite raunchy. I’ll say this though, I remember every word of what he says.

“Never exceed 140 mph under ANY circumstances, Winningstad, actually, make that 130. I’ve seen you stunting about in the Bristol and the DH. We don’t have many of these Sopwiths, so for God’s sake, see that you don’t rip the bloody wings off on your first day. The red light’s not on. Gently at first, Winningstad, as with a new bride, eh?”

17 March 1917
Letter from Eliza. A second “dear Oliver” in the text, but also yet another reference to the “poor boys,” and how nice it is to read the letters of thanks they send her. Is she teasing or should I be jealous? Jealous of what, Oliver? You only met her once for Pete’s sake, and yet ...

22 March 1917
To War! Orders for France. My training cut short by a week, but I’ve had almost 8 hours on the Sopwith. Many went over with far less time. I’m lucky there. I must write Eliza with the good news. Not much time. I must get to London. Victoria Station to Folkestone to Boulogne, then to St. Omer.


Last edited by epower; 04/10/20 03:27 AM.
#4515592 - 04/10/20 02:43 AM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Nigel Farnsworth Philby
Sgt, Rfc
1 Rfc Sqn
Flanders
2 unconfirmed
Bell Asylum, Flanders

April 10, 1917.

I took 2 new guys up for a balloon busting mission. Told em to stay tight all fire to gether, We went in a Vee of 3 a/c. Made a pass reload turned around and made a second pass the balloon burned nicely. Although all fired ,Credit went to the # 3 a/c Lt. Thames.

Attached Files CFS3 2020-04-09 19-14-27-48.jpgCFS3 2020-04-09 19-18-10-59.jpgCFS3 2020-04-09 19-18-43-44.jpgCFS3 2020-04-09 19-17-02-72.jpg
Last edited by carrick58; 04/10/20 02:44 AM.
#4515620 - 04/10/20 09:49 AM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Riane - sorry to hear about Capt. Collins - such bad luck


'Der Fuchs'

BOC Member
'BWOC BWOC BWOC'
#4515649 - 04/10/20 02:28 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Carrick - Archie got pretty darned close to Nigel in that one shot. Bet that tossed him around a bit.

Epower - no worries, I was just giving you a wind up. Now to Oliver's latest, another stellar read. And that Eliza seems a fine woman, bit of a tease perhaps, but a fine woman none-the-less.

MFair - you may have a point there. The Hun can just stay on the ground, grab a bier, and watch the King's airman run into each other.

.

10 April 1917
66 Squadron R.F.C.
Vert Galand, France

"Did you really think that was what was meant by 'more appropriate', Captain?" Major Boyd's voice was raised, a rarity for him as he was nearly always calm, at least outwardly, in any situation. This particular situation concerned Captain Swanson and the way in which he had just repainted his repaired Sopwith.

"Yeah Major, I tink it's pretty damd't appropriate, for an American volunteer who is proud to be flying for you Birts and is proud to represent his own damd't country too, now that they've finally joined the fight." Captain Swanson was speaking at an elevated volume as well, and was making no apologies for it. And his northern Minnesotan/Norwegian accent was getting thicker as his anger rose.

"Don't talk to me in that tone Captain, we'll keep some proper discipline while we're discussing this", the CO demanded.

"Look Major, I'm not meaning you any disrespect, I tink your a fine man, but by god't I am going to have my say in dis! I have been in dis now for vell over a year and I tink I've earned some certain rights and respect. Yet despite da fact dat I'm da second highest scoring ace in the RFC and RNAS combined I still get treated as some kind'a outsider, not worthy of dose rights or respect somehow. I was a station commander when they parked my backside in Home Defense for three months, yet when dey send me back over here I'm made a flight leader again, don't tink I don't know why. It's pretty damd't obvious to anyvun vit half a brain dat HQ doesn't want a Yank in command of an RFC combat unit. Fine, so be it. But if I'm destined to remain a flight leader for what few days or weeks I have left on dis damd't planet den by god't I'm gonna at least have a say in how I paint my damd't plane! Hell, Ball across the road has two god't damd't planes he can do anything he likes vit, and I'm getting my arse chewed for slapping some color on my one. Bullshitte!"

Major Boyd had remained silent throughout the Captain's tirade, studying the young man across from him, knowing full well his anger was not about the livery. It was about losing good friends to this madness, it was about one's own mortality, it was about the seeming futility of it all. What the Major had not known, had never really even considered until this moment, was how it must feel to someone born and raised in another country who pledged his allegiance, indeed his very life, to fight for England, yet is treated as somehow less than those of British blood doing the same thing. The CO collected his thoughts, then spoke quietly.

"Swany, I can understand your frustration, and I don't fault you for being angry, you've every right to be. I also agree it's not fair that they aren't advancing you, in particular given the skills you've demonstrated as a leader. For what it's worth, I will send a recommendation myself to HQ that you should be given your own command, though I don't imagine it will carry all that much weight. As for your plane, I am not going to deny you the new livery, garish as it may be. Your points concerning it were well made, profanity riddled as they were, and I accept them. And if General Trenchard catches wind of it I'll tell him I gave my permission and make your argument known to him as well. But listen old man, no matter how angry you might be, or however upset you are over losing your chum, you still need to show the proper respect to a superior officer - that's simply how it has to be you know."

Swanson let his anger and sadness slink back into its hiding place as he stared at the floor in front of him. He felt sheepish now for his outburst, none of this was Boyd's fault.

"I'm sorry Sir, I had no right talking to you like that. It's just - it's - this god't damd't war - it just keeps chewing us up and spitting us out, and..." Swany's voice trailed off as he shifted his gaze out the window and watched the rain spattering against it.

Major Boyd let the silence stand for a minute or two before he spoke. "Captain, why don't you take the rest of the day and collect yourself. I can get Lieutenant Andrews to run the afternoon show for you."

"No Major, thank you, but that's fine - I'd rather be flying anyway if you don't mind", Swanson responded, a tone of resignation in his voice.

"Very well Captain, if that's what you'd prefer. Just keep your wits about you up there. If the Hun weren't gunning for you before they most certainly will be now when they see that new gypsy wagon of yours."

Swany laughed. "Yeah, you're probably right Sir, but that's fine. It'll lure them closer and give me a better shot."


[Linked Image]

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#4515656 - 04/10/20 03:28 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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My goodness, Lou, what a rig. But it appears that Swany's star spangled top hat blew off!

Still in the midst of my Saturday morning reading. I see epower has brought his backstory up to date (almost). Cant wait to read it.

#4515659 - 04/10/20 03:47 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Lou, mow that is what I call a ride!


Never approach a bull from the front, a horse from the rear or a fool from either end.
BOC Member since....I can't remember!
#4515687 - 04/10/20 05:17 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Quote
if General Trenchard catches wind of it


IF he catches wind of it?? Whadda you mean, if? biggrin

#4515712 - 04/10/20 07:50 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Holy Cats what a Kite. Did ya leave any paint for the Airfield buildings ?

Last edited by carrick58; 04/10/20 07:52 PM.
#4515714 - 04/10/20 07:59 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Raine, it is tricky keeping that Uncle Sam hat on, what with the prop wash and all.

MFair, it remains to be seen what the brass hats will call it.

Bob, you never know, Trenchard is fairly busy with the spring offensive and whatnot, so Swany's new livery may escape his notice.

Carrick, there's plenty of paint left for the buildings, Swany didn't use any of the olive drab.

.

#4515724 - 04/10/20 08:51 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Nigel Farnsworth Philby
Sgt, Rfc
1 Rfc Sqn
Flanders
2 unconfirmed
Bell Asylum, Flanders


April 11, 1917.


Posted as duty Sgt. No flying just doing details. I had a squad of riggers Raking the dirt, must have clean lines, by Ops and the C.O.'s shack then collecting and painting Rocks to Form pathways to the shacks and the Mess. What a way to fight a war. On the upside a new British Scout is being seen on the front, 200 HP Hispano motor with a squared off nose and 2 guns. Some say a Fast kite. Also rumor has it that we will be refitting with another Sqn's hand me downs which are upgraded N-17's called N-23 or N-24's. sometime next month.

Attached Files gettyimages-90780475-1024x1024se5.jpgnieuport-nie-17-for-flyboys-960x540FlyBoys.jpg
Last edited by carrick58; 04/10/20 09:13 PM.
#4515734 - 04/10/20 10:57 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Lou - I hope Swanny lets all the pilots look to their heart's content before they take off.. We don't want his flight zooming in for a close-up when aloft.

Carrick - Love what Nigel's done with the place. Now all that's left is a Zen pebble spiral.

Last edited by epower; 04/10/20 11:18 PM.
#4515761 - 04/11/20 05:58 AM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Woah. A lot to catch up on!!

Raine - Absolutely gutted about James going West. Just after being reunited with Swany, too! He was one of the absolute greatest and most well-written characters that it's been my pleasure to follow in the campaign, and will be sorely missed. I may just have to copy all of Collins' entries into a .PDF and keep it as a secret private little E-Book. I look forwards to meeting the new chap.

Lou - That's just too damned close. Poor Swany - it's a terrible thing to be the last of the original 'Morane Trio'. It sounds like the war's really taking its toll on the poor fellow. I only hope he doesn't do anything too reckless. I love the pure insanity of the new livery...it's a head-turner!

I'm working on catching up Mr. Easom to present-day...

Last edited by Wulfe; 04/11/20 05:59 AM.
#4515797 - 04/11/20 01:04 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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L'Etoile du Nord
.

Carrick - Nigel makes a fine Duty Sergeant. He has the place looking most spit-spot. He may wind up with the job permanently if he's not careful.

Epower - yes, let's hope.

Wulfe - Swany is having a tough time accepting the fact that he is that last original member of the trio. He really does feel his days are numbered and there's no hope of surviving the madness. He's made of stern stuff though, so who knows. And his mood is fairly improved after today's missions.

.

11 April 1917
66 Squadron R.F.C.
Vert Galand, France

It was a good day for Captain Swanson and his crew. He took B Flight out on two different escort jobs and by the time both missions were completed he and the rest of B Flight had put in claims for six V-strutters and had only lost one Pup, (though all others had been damaged to varying degrees). The write-off was Sammy Luke's mount and he crashed it during the afternoon outing after a protracted battle with five Albs that in all likelihood were from the "Flying Circus". The Lieutenant managed to get back across the lines before he put down, and was quickly attended to by men from the aerodrome at Etrun where he had crashed. Apart from some bad bruising and a severely twisted ankle Sammy fared relatively well.

Swany's new livery met with mixed reviews, with some of the lads thinking it "spiffing" while others though it looked like a Hun kite. One thing was certain, there was no missing it. The Captain hoped it might actually minimize the risk of collisions, but that remained to be proven.


Morning sortie: Keeping watch over a trio of Quirks from 16 Squadron on their way to recce the lines at Vimy.
[Linked Image]


Catching a lone Hun unaware and dispatching him with a single volley.
[Linked Image]


Sending a second V-strutter down in flames that had attempted to attack the BEs
[Linked Image]


Afternoon sortie: Escorting another three Quirks from 16 Squadron, this time to keep watch as they bomb the depot east of Vitry-en-Artois. Archie was fierce.
[Linked Image]


B Flight diving on a gaggle of V-strutters rising up from Douai to intercept the BEs. Swanson deemed it better to catch them low and leave the Hun little room to work with.
[Linked Image]


The Captain latches onto one with an all-gray fuselage. Swany's had a go-round with this fellow before, and once more sends him down, watching the Hun bounce hard in the field below and ending up on his top wing.
[Linked Image]


The next one Swanson goes at has an all-red fuselage and the King's airman wonders if this is the enemy ace Richthofen. Whoever it is, the Captain sends him down as well and sees the Alb hit the ground hard but stays upright and intact.
[Linked Image]


Back at camp, Captain Swanson waits for a straggler to return before going to fill out his AAR and claims. He put in for a day's total of four.
[Linked Image]

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#4515802 - 04/11/20 02:02 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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I say, Tidy is as Tidy does around the Base Camp.

#4515867 - 04/11/20 08:05 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Carrick, making the place presentable keeps up moral.
Lou, I think that was the Baron himself!
Wulfe, looking forward to seeing you back in action.

Ltn. Gunther Ganz
Jasta 6, Wassigny
April 11, 1917

Ganz was in high spirits today. He had led his first patrol yesterday and one of his Kette had claimed a Nieuport. Best of all, they all returned safe. Being responsible for a flight brought a whole new feeling to Ganz. He liked it.

Wulf would be leading the morning flight. They took off at daylight. While weather was not perfect, it was much better than it had been the past few days. Everyone was alert. They knew the French and English would be up. The flight was tasked with patrolling the airfields around their area. They had no more than reached their patrolling altitude when Ganz spotted 4 specks above and they were coming down to play. Wulf had spotted them also and started climbing to engage. As the two flights met, the melee dissolved into individual fights. Ganz easily latched on to the tail of one and almost felt sorry for the pilot as his gunner was frozen in fear and didn’t fire a shot. The Strutter went down in flames from 3000m. Ganz climbed, scanning the sky. A Strutter went past him with 2 Abatri on his tail. He then saw one of his flight slightly above with a Strutter behind and Ganz pulled the stick back to engage. The Frenchman didn’t notice the impending danger and Ganz fired a long burst hitting the machine and driving him off. Ganz rolled over onto the tail of the diving Strutter firing burst after burst before his own machine was hit by bullets. He pulled up as another Strutter went by him. He quickly latched on his new adversary but this gunner was not scared at all and sent a volley into the Albatros making Ganz break off. He felt another volley hit his machine as he turned. “This fellow is good” Ganz thought to himself. They both went down to the deck with Ganz weaving to stay out of the line of fire and trying to get a burst in at the same time. As the Strutter leveled out Ganz fired a burst hitting the Gunner. With his next burst the Strutters wing collapsed and it hit the earth just north of Escaufourt in a cloud of dust. The flight claimed 3 with no losses.


Never approach a bull from the front, a horse from the rear or a fool from either end.
BOC Member since....I can't remember!
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