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#4510260 - 03/10/20 02:40 AM Re: VonS "Casual Campaigns" WOFF Thread [Re: VonS]  
Joined: Mar 2011
Posts: 338
VonS Offline
WWI Flight Sims on a Mac
VonS  Offline
WWI Flight Sims on a Mac
Member

Joined: Mar 2011
Posts: 338
Mission No. 7 for Hauptmann Kiener

(note: 1.4/1.2/1.1.1 GPU Tuner Patch combo. in place; BB's clouds ver. 2.9.2 loaded and functioning well; JJJ's Multimod ver. 2.1 activated; claims/promotions are at "medium" difficulty settings, as for all previous missions)

-----
The C.O. was again in an agitated state, after the tumultous events of the last several days, and he suggested a long bombing run on the enemy's aerodrome southwest of Bailleul for the morning of the 22nd of Nov. Aviatiks of Bosta 1 would be dropping bombs on the 'drome known as La Gorgue, as would the two resident Aviatiks from Ghistelles. The idea was that Kiener and Hutzenlaub accompany Bosta 2's Aviatiks to the destination, and to loiter about for some time until all German two-seaters had vacated the area. The suggestion seemed reasonable enough, although Hauptmann Kiener was somewhat hesitant to get into the now finally repaired, colorful Eindecker that had once belonged to v. Pranz. For assurance, he inspected it as it was being rolled out of its hangar, with the morning sun glistening on its wings, and with some riggers doubly checking that all the control wires were tight and the wing-warping assembly in order.

'Looking pensive, sir?,' was Hutzenlaub's question, as he emerged from the other side of the hangar to give his own monoplane a look-over before they ascended. 'Indeed,' the Hauptmann commented - 'today we must break the string of bad luck that has plagued us for the last several days, and to keep in one piece.' 'Aye, that I can agree with,' reflected the Leutnant, without indicating whether he meant the bad luck or that they keep in one piece. In the meantime, they had done up their gear, and also packed tightly a couple of flasks that would be of benefit on the lengthy flight. 'Two flasks?,' asked Kiener. 'Something I learnt a while back on those nasty, long reconnoitering flights, Herr Hauptmann, when I was with Bosta 1,' responded Hutzenlaub - 'one flask of water for standard procedure, the other filled either with cognac or schnapps, for emergency procedure.' 'Most interesting,' was the Hauptmann's response - 'my second flask will in that case include an elixir of bitter, to settle the stomach and sooth the nerves, although, if you follow standard procedure and fly slightly above me, and about half-a-kilometer back, Leutnant, I am sure that I will not experience any indigestion; and now, if you please.'

Their Oberursels had by then been primed, the signal given, and the chalks removed, with both monoplanes ascending quickly into the fresh, late November air, to follow briefly the two Aviatiks that, with their slower speed, had been given a head-start. Observing that all was well, with no enemy aeroplanes in the vicinity - Kiener motioned with his wings and he and the Leutnant proceeded to gain alt., with their noses pointed in the direction of Diksmuide. For the last several days the Hauptmann had been thinking of the malevolent balloon there that had marked v. Pranz's demise, and he was interested in paying the gasbag a visit. 'Today is a fine, sunny time for gasbag bursting,' he thought to himself, while the Eindecker continued to carry him ever higher. They passed the lines slightly north of Diksmuide at an alt. of about 2000 m, scanning the skies to the left and right, back, and above, to make certain that no English or French machines were preparing to give them the jump. With things looking serene and still sleepy at this early hour of the morning, Kiener thinned out the rotary to four-fifths power and began a steady descent, with the balloon already in his sights. One or two glances back were given to make sure that Hutzenlaub was following - and then the chatter of the Spandau, a quick and noisy form of communication, to be followed by a stream of smoke rising from the stricken gasbag. No sooner had the Hauptmann passed over the balloon than an immense detonation was heard that slightly threw the Eindecker upwards - but with Kiener, most joyous, still in control of the aeroplane.

Composure maintained, and the target destroyed, Kiener signalled that they continue onwards, towards their destination - while simultaneously gaining much-needed altitude. Soon they were at 1500 m, when another balloon came into view - hovering over the meadows, and located roughly between Diksmuide and Ypres. The same procedure was now followed, even more quickly than with the gasbag above Diksmuide. A steady dive, the engine this time at two-thirds power, the Hauptmann carefully keeping the sights as stable as possible, and then a goodly series of rounds being sent in this balloon's direction - to be followed by hissing, steam, black smoke and the satisfying explosion. 'My wonder, they certainly put these gasbags up rather quickly after I down them!,' thought the Hauptmann at this point, but more flying awaited. They continued further south, now veering slightly to the east, for both flyers knew that here, most likely, another gasbag would be waiting - and indeed it was, floating rather naively above the western outskirts of Ypres. Kiener here decided to dive at full throttle, coming awfully close to 200 km/h, but the Spandau's sights were still held steadily over the balloon. It was best here, thought Kiener, to swoop in and be done with it as soon as possible, for there were stronger concentrations of rifle and artillery around this pesky bag of hydrogen. And so it was: a quick swoop downwards, as that of an eagle accelerating towards its prey, and then several percussive pops of the Spandau - to be greeted with flames, and a lovely, lingering explosion that put a smile on Kiener's face once he glanced back to admire the results of his handiwork.

Soon after, as they were gaining alt. between Ypres and Messines, Hutzenlaub gestured towards another balloon located not too far from Messines - but Kiener signalled in the negative, since this would now mean a loss of much-needed altitude that would be of great benefit as they passed over and above the two British 'dromes located west of Armentieres, and that were already known by the Germans for their collection of Morane Parasols. In fact, as early as the spring of 1915, a certain Capt. Dobson from one of those 'dromes was responsible for afflicting noticeable damage to the Pfalz factory south of Lens. The name was of course not known to the German military since the English top brass preferred to keep their pilots veiled perpetually with a curtain of modesty, but the exploits certainly were making the rounds - and word of this had eventually reached Bosta 2 as well. Kiener, though brave, was no fool, and decided that unnecessary risk was now uncalled for. And so he and Hutzenlaub thus proceeded, at the now safe altitude of 2400 m, towards their destination that was not too far further south of Bailleul and the Imperial Forest immediately below Bailleul.

'What a lovely and clear morning,' here Kiener again pondered - 'if it wasn't for the war, some leasurely flying would be most welcome.' And, indeed, the sun's rays were now higher up in the east, presenting a scene worthy of the Kodak & Eastman Company, even more so once the two Aviatiks from Bosta 1 entered the picture frame, to do a wide turn towards the south, while edging closer to La Gorgue. Here Hutzenlaub wagged his wings again; but, Kiener, first observing the skies, could not understand what was being signalled - there were no enemy aircraft in the vicinity. Granted, he did spot a solitary gunbus floating above one of the 'dromes near Armentieres, but it was more than a thousand meters below, and of no concern. Soon, a whizzing sound was heard as the Bosta 1 Aviatiks began dropping bombs over their target, to do several more wide turns and to repeat the process. They then pointed again northwards and slowly disappeared, but in the meantime their own Aviatiks, from Bosta 2, had arrived, also to drop their luggage on La Gorgue, and then to proceed merrily northward, slightly below the two Eindeckers that were still doing wide, patrolling circles in the area.

'It is about time now that we head back as well,' here thought Kiener, and motioned to the Leutnant. The signal was followed by a wide, descending turn towards Armentieres, with the duo dropping down to about 2000 m alt., and purposefully so - for the Hauptmann was most curious, with his remaining rounds, to try for the problematic gasbag that was located on the eastern side of the town. Unexpectedly, however, and while they were descending rapidly - Hutzenlaub levelled out - and instead did a wide turn again, to head towards the River Lys and the front lines between Neuve Chapelle and Loos. 'What insolence!,' Kiener roared over the sound of his Oberursel, 'can it be that Hutzenlaub has gone mad?' - what could be the matter he thought. The Hauptmann's Eindecker here entered a steep, spiralling dive towards Hutzenlaub, maintaining a precarious angle for Kiener better to observe the situation - and, now it was evident - that Hutzenlaub's Oberursel had ground to a halt, with the monoplane now gliding towards the lines. 'I will leave you here awhile my friend,' now thought the Hauptmann - 'proceed at that exact angle,' he further ruminated, and now motioned with his hands, while holding the control stick between his knees; 'proceed exactly like so.' This was greeted by a nod from the Leutnant, but Kiener had already entered a dive, to attack the balloon below. And a troublesome attack it was, two times hampered by turbulence that threw the Hauptmann's aim off. Only on the third attempt was the gasbag on fire and deflating at a satisfyingly rapid rate, to sink onto the grass near the outskirts of Armentieres. 'Dreadful winds, they are always here around this balloon!,' uttered Kiener - 'but where is the Leutnant?'

The Eindecker here entered an ascent, at full throttle, and was soon near the Lys, with Hutzenlaub's Eindecker spotted below, no more than 100 meters above the ground by this point, and gliding directly above the river, in the vicinity of two bridges. Kiener remained slightly above, to hear occasional rifle fire that was taking shots at Hutzenlaub. Miraculously, the Leutnant did not crash but proceeded to glide, finally alighting about 50 meters south of the river and along the trench lines, to come to a stop near a rather large, carbonized-looking tree that had seen better days. Kiener leaned his engine and dove in, doing a slow flyby to inspect - and to be greeted with a wave from Hutzenlaub. Here again, rifle shots were heard and the Hauptmann opened the throttle fully, realizing that it was best not to advertize Hutzenlaub's location to the entire line of trenches in the vicinity. With less than 20% fuel remaining, and only 60 rounds in the Spandau, Kiener flew on towards a small 'drome near Lens, and that v. Pranz had told him of many missions ago. But, already in visual distance of the 'drome, two specks were now spotted to his left, near the outer disk of the sun's rays. These specks then became larger, and soon the grunting of their LeRhone rotaries was unmistakable - two beige Parasols, British, were returning to the 'dromes near Armentieres! And soon a waltz erupted, with Kiener pulling up underneath the two Parasols to assess the situation further, the two Parasols then dancing around him, with each letting off a few rounds from their guns, and then coming back together again, only to repeat the process a couple of more times. Here, Kiener danced some more around them - 'but enough of this early morning prancing,' he thought. Kiener picked out the one that was slightly lagging behind, came up again, a bit below and to the right of him, and emptied first 20 or so rounds into the fuselage, and then the remaining 30 or 40 rounds into the Parasol's rotary. A few puffs of smoke then emerged from under the cowling, and the propeller spun to a stop. The observer was nonetheless a stubborn fellow and kept cracking with his Lewis M.G. at Kiener, even while the Parasol was descending. Kiener circled a few times until the Parasol finally alighted, near the lines where Hutzenlaub was last seen, but on the German side, with the pilot and observer captured soon afterwards. The other Parasol had by now gained noticeable height and was already on the other side of the river; and, besides, Kiener's Spandau was now empty.

Less than 10 minutes later Kiener's Eindecker was in front of one of the empty hangars at the 'drome north of Lens, with five claims being wired to Ghistelles, for four balloons and a British Parasol. Also wired was Hutzenlaub's approximate location. Soon, the C.O. was already on the phone, chronically animated, to congratulate Kiener that all five claims had been verified, even by German batteries in the relevant sectors. 'Yes, that is all good and well, and I am most appreciative, delighted really, sir, but how to get to Hutzenlaub - and his Eindecker, it is still intact, possibly to fall into the enemy's hands?' - Kiener asked with a worried tone. 'Yes, the Eindecker is no laughing matter - that is a problem - perhaps he will manage to destroy it somehow, Kiener; from your description of the location, it is likely that he is on the British side of the lines, although awfully close to no man's land - no way of telling what will happen now. Go have supper later at Schmidt's in Lens, v. Pranz may have told you about it,' responded the C.O. 'Yes, excellent sausages and sauerkraut,' was Kiener's rather irritated response. 'Ah!, so you know about it, wonderful,' replied the C.O. - 'now good day to you and let me know if any news of Hutzenlaub comes through; I expect you back on the 24th, if you need a day for repairs on the Eindecker.'

While this was transpiring at the 'drome north of Lens, Hutzenlaub dreaded the strangest of predicaments that he had ever fallen into. The River Lys was visible, and its two bridges, behind the tail of his Eindecker. In front of the nose, and the tree that was masking the aeroplane, was a stretch of uninhabitable mud and depressions, about 30 meters wide, and ending with the German dugouts on the other side. Immediately behind him were the enemy's dugouts, some 15 to 20 meters removed. This was no good at all he thought. He had already gathered his kit, made sure that both of his flasks were intact, and was now resting, and trying to be as still as possible, in a depression in the ground next to the tree, and underneath one of the monoplane's wings. 'If only I can hold out here for a while, and then somehow to withdraw into another of the many indentations in no man's land, there to await nightfall - it may then be possible to get back to my side of the lines.'

Other thoughts also flowed rapidly through his mind now, some of elation at having managed to bring the Eindecker down onto the only flat spot of earth in the vicinity, and some of dread - as to the consequences, either of being captured, to survive the rest of the war in imprisonment, for who can know how long it will last - or, to squeeze into no man's land and be pulverized by artillery fire later in the day. He thought back to his school days and boyhood tricks, some of which might prove helpful now - at any rate, at least to help pass the time. The flask with cognac was also beneficial, with not too much of it to be enjoyed, but only a small portion, to harden the nerves, to strengthen the perspective, and also to help Hutzenlaub to hear, in his head, the many pleasant Kaiser Marsches that he enjoyed listening to, and as played by various military bands, when he was still a young and curious student in Baden-Baden.

His greatest worry was that there was no way of setting the Eindecker on fire - to make sure that it did not fall into the enemy's hands, to be dismantled, inspected, also to have the interruptor gear studied. This would not do - and would be a shambles if it became known. He devised soon after a perverse plan, to make his presence known, with the whistling of some of the tunes he remembered as a boy, and thus to draw the enemy batteries' attention to his location. But he would only do this later in the day. Contemplating these possibilities, and others, the hours went by, with only occasional sniper fire heard, a ricochet or two in the vicinity, one or two plucks at the wings of the monoplane - but that was all.

Soon, it was twilight, and the outrageous plan was in effect. A few loud whistles and ditties were uttered by the Leutnant, with Hutzenlaub already crawling away into no man's land through a space where no barbed wire was present. He was slowly and stealthily crawling on all fours, already all muddied and filthy, but this was also serving as fine camouflage. It was not possible for him to estimate precise locations since he was deep in mud by that point, and still moving forward, when several loud detonations were heard emanating from the back, to be followed by a singular image, of the Eindecker's shattered propeller falling in Hutzenlaub's vicinity. He then remained motionless, for several minutes, while the detonations continued - in total he counted six or seven large eruptions, and then silence again, to be broken by some occasional rifle fire, sometimes close by, other times heard from a distance. He resumed his crawling, stopping only when he found himself in one of the larger depressions, about a meter in depth, and that allowed for him to remain unnoticed until nightfall. It would be entirely reckless now to pop out his head and verify destruction of the Eindecker, and so he kept still - assuming, and hoping, that the splintered propeller that fell nearby was evidence enough of the enemy's foolish battery - that had pounded hard what should have been considered a valuable military trophy.

Another couple of artillery barrages took place as night fell, but then all was relatively quiet, except for the intermittent pow-pow-whiz sound of a stray shell. Here, Hutzenlaub thought of some of his relatives, and their stories from his youth, of how two fellows from his family had worked as hired guns for Wells Fargo in the America of the 1850s, before returning to Baden-Baden prior to the Civil War erupting there. 'Pow-pow' went a stray artillery shell again, with Hutzenlaub imitating the sound and imagining himself as a pistolero from another century and involved in other distant skirmishes. But soon he came to his senses, took a swig of cold water from the other flask, and resumed his slow and steady crawl - to emerge, or rather, fall into, one of the German trenches. 'Hallo, und was ist das?,' grunted out one of the voices in the trench. 'A fellow soldier and an airman, Leutnant Hutzenlaub,' was the response. This was followed by a chorus of loud laughter - 'and if this is the condition of our airmen,' said one of the soldiers, 'we are certainly in good hands.' More grunts and laughter followed, with a drink of schnapps then passed around to soften the jabs, and to cap off both the Leutnant's dexterity and originality of escape.

The next day was, in a way, anticlimactic almost. Hutzenlaub had been transported to the 'drome near Lens during the cover of the previous night, stories of adventure had been exchanged, and Kiener then realized why the Leutnant had a few times responded strangely to signals given during the flight on the morning of the 22nd. His fuel tank had received some minor damage from ground fire during one of the balloon attacks, and the gasoline had disappeared half an hour earlier than would otherwise have been the case. 'But enough of these anxious and morbid tales of escape,' eventually commented Kiener - 'tonight we dine at Schmidt's in style, and tomorrow we return to Ghistelles, I in my repaired Eindecker and you in another one that we shall kindly borrow from the 'drome here.' 'But why the supper and celebration?,' asked the Leutnant - 'granted, you are now a grosse Kanonen with your 10 victories, surpassing both Immelmann's and Boelcke's scores; however, there seems to be other information you are withholding, as you typically do.'

Here, Kiener merely smiled; he would reveal all at Schmidt's, namely, that the C.O. had wired him again on the 23rd, the slip of paper indicating that he was being promoted to Rittmeister upon his return to Ghistelles, and that he would be the very first of German flyers to be awarded the coveted Pour le Mérite. It would be given to him by the Kaiser, personally - at a later date. Kiener hoped that the medal would eventually become known as Der blaue Eberhard.
-----

Von S smile

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Last edited by VonS; 05/26/20 02:47 AM. Reason: Embedded pic. for atmosphere.

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#4510703 - 03/13/20 03:52 AM Re: VonS "Casual Campaigns" WOFF Thread [Re: VonS]  
Joined: Mar 2011
Posts: 338
VonS Offline
WWI Flight Sims on a Mac
VonS  Offline
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Mission No. 10 for Cap'n. Dobson & Company

-----
After a late breakfast today, of brown beans and soft boiled eggs, we were instructed via telephone, by our ever-austere C.O., Sir Salmond, Sr., to undertake a spotting mission of enemy troop positions and batteries further north, towards and slightly below Diksmuide. To fly with me, as ordered, was another Parasol, and to be manned by Ltn. Strugnell. My observer, as usual, would be Henderson. For good measure, we each also took up four 20 kg bombs - in case favorable situations emerged that would offer us a chance to give a good pounding to the enemy.

What was not working in our favor, at all, this day of the 23rd of May, were the clouds and winds - with horribly obscure conditions, as well as low-lying fog, and occasional wind gusts that were most difficult to surmount in our Parasols. We ascended sprightly enough, but, turning towards the lines, it became an exercise of coordination and dexterity to maneuver our crates into any semblance of flight. These Morane Parasols, with their high-mounted wings, function sometimes as umbrellas if the winds pick up, and we several times were subject to extreme tossings, back and forth, until the winds slackened to offer temporary respite from such ordeals. Henderson frequently grimaced during such turbulent moments - and in one instance, while we were passing onto the German side of the lines, near the batteries south of Ypres - a robust gust of wind threw us into a stall and flat spin. Fortunately, I was already well-attuned to the Parasol's peculiarities and immediately went into a nose-down position, with liberal application of rudder opposite to the spin, to straighten out, and without losing too much altitude - to emerge in one piece at approximately 1100 m.

We here did several wide circles above the German batteries in the area, and also observed a large battle taking place below, of operatic, Wagnerian proportions. Fortunately, the low fog, hovering in the vicinity, spared us the brunt of flak bursts and rifle fire from the trenches below. I here signalled to Strugnell, in the other aeroplane, that he drop at least one or two bombs on enemy positions he considered worthy of targetting, and, from a slightly higher alt., I observed the attacks. Several runs were made, and a total of three bombs dropped. Considering this adequate, I gave the signal again and our duo of Parasols proceeded further north, towards the area around Passchendale. Immediately southwest of the town, we spotted one of those German observation sausages and I indicated to Ltn. Strugnell, ever keen on taking out a gasbag, that he attack it when feasible. His observer, an excellent shot, soon riddled the balloon with their Lewis M.G., and three plumes of smoke were then seen emerging from its top - soon to be followed by an explosion, and the debris sinking beneath the sea of fog below.

We then proceeded northwesterly to an area close to the lines, where I dropped all four of my bombs near a delapidated German factory that likely served as a storage site for their munitions. No sooner had I dropped the bombs than the ensuing explosions were spotted by one of our own guns across the lines, that then opened up and hit the factory several times, whereupon it was transformed into smoldering ruin. Here, I decided that it was practical to harrass one of the other enemy balloons that was not too far from the lines, and so, the signal was given, and both I and Strugnell dove at the balloon several times. Henderson got several shots into it, as did Strugnell's observer, but neither of them was successful in bringing this other balloon down. The winds were again picking up, and noticeably so, to toss us around once again, and I here considered it appropriate that we slowly turn back towards our 'drome north of Armentieres. No sooner had I given the signal to Strugnell that he return to the aerodrome, than my Parasol was hit several times, through the fuselage and rotary, by shots from below - Henderson estimated that at least five or six rifles had opened up at us. The more immediate problem was that our LeRhone now ground to a halt, with the petrol tank holed as well, and with wounds having been inflicted on both Henderson and myself. I could feel a burning and pricking sensation, which indicated to me that my nether regions had received some lead - whereas, in Henderson's case, there was a bullet wound in his flying gear close to his right shoulder.

In this dire situation, I did my best to give the crate a solid dead-stick landing, although, with the engine now of no use, we were wildly being tossed about by the winds that were even worse at these low altitudes. I headed directly for the lines, gliding at no more than 200 m alt., and hearing more rifle shots directed towards us. Somehow, we remained intact and I plopped the Parasol down, whereupon it soon came to a stop. We were about three kilometers from the lines, and on the German side. 'Horrors!,' uttered Henderson, 'let's make a run Cap.'n towards some of those buildings that are immediately behind us, and endeavor to remain invisible until the evening.' The advice was quickly accepted, and we huddled behind some walls that were not too far back from the Parasol. Fortunately, we did not have to wait for the night, but, very thick fog having rolled in by the late afternoon, we made a run for it through no man's land, gingerly avoiding the barbed wire, and were after one hour or so on our side of the lines. Soon a lorry was made available and we were, by the evening, after several more hours marked by a very bumpy ride, at our 'drome near Armentieres.

Our wounds proved less serious than they looked; and, Henderson was promised a 48 hrs. pass to Paris, in two days' time, once his shoulder wound had closed up a bit. I was on the other hand offered no such pass. Instead, I was rung up later in the night by our C.O. again, with Salmond Sr. blaring over the phone lines that, in the future, I was to do no such reckless things as attack German gasbags or order others to attack these things. I was to limit myself and my flights strictly to bombing of enemy batteries, factories, and attacks on enemy aircraft only if they were obstructing us in our missions. This was made very clear, with Salmond suggesting that 'it just won't do' what transpired today, and that, even worse, the Germans had dismantled our Parasol and sent it to one of their 'dromes for inspection. I lamented this and mentioned that our matches were wet - although we did attempt to light it. But my remonstrations were useless, and I tactfully apologized for the mishap.

On a more positive note, Salmond was pleased that several enemy positions close to Ypres had been hit by our bombs, and also that the factory further north, near the lines, had been destroyed. I thanked him for this before he hung up the receiver. And, truth be told, I was more impressed to hear, from Ltn. Strugnell, that word had gotten around of my and Henderson's great escape - that word had spread to other quarters too. Of all things, even Lady Harbury was to visit me on the 'morrow since she adored 'war heroes.' Exhausted from the day's endeavors, I then fell into a deep sleep, to dream of the elegant lady's visit the next day, and a very pleasant dream it turned out to be - in which she was most attentive to my groin wound.
-----

Von S smile

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Last edited by VonS; 05/26/20 02:49 AM. Reason: Embedded pic. for atmosphere.

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#4512790 - 03/26/20 02:56 AM Re: VonS "Casual Campaigns" WOFF Thread [Re: VonS]  
Joined: Mar 2011
Posts: 338
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Mission No. 11 for Cap'n. Johnny Dobson & Company

(note: WOFF GPU Tuner Patch in place, with combo 1.4/1.2/1.1.1; also in place is ver. 2.1 of JJJ's MultiMod; as well being tested is a beta ver. of BB's clouds mod. for WOFFpe, to be released later)

-----
It was a pleasant couple of days, as if time was now standing still, the minutes having been elongated after our escapade of the 23rd - with Lady Harbury indeed visiting - and spending several lovely hours with me and the boys, discussing various burlesque shows and pantomimes that she would often perform in Paris, and that had caught the attention of myriads of journals and reviews. She urged me to visit her voluptuous residence, as soon as possible; although, I jokingly suggested that if our C.O. remained as strict as we had already become accustomed to - I would sooner join her after the war. 'War or no war, my brave Captain - I await you in my studio, and please, do call me Clarissa.' Such were her affectionate and parting words, uttered in a soothing manner and penetrating all of my fibers, for she had a fine mezzo-soprano voice that was like balm upon the ears.

Henderson was in the meantime on his two days' pass, in Paris, hopefully to forget about our hair-raising incident in which we had barely evaded capture - his shoulder wound was healing nicely, the local 'doc told us - although my damaged nether regions were proving more troublesome, not in and of themselves, the wound itself being not that serious - but it was dreadful to sit down in one spot for any period of time longer than about half of one hour. 'And, tell me good 'doc Brown,' I asked - 'how exactly am I to carry out our longer reconnoitering flights with this pesky wound? - be aware that we don't fly with upholstered furniture in our Parasols.' 'But have no fear, Captain,' was his overly confident response. 'You see, I recently wrote a voluminous research paper, in octavo size, outlining the benefits of light anesthetising injections to such wounds, which, if all was well and the wound kept clean, would hasten the process of recovery, also pleasantly numbing any unbecoming sensations emanating from around or within the wound. Consider, for example, the variety of injections I can administer in the field hospital not too far from the 'drome here: injections ranging from chloroform and diethyl ether to C.E. mixture, and also, what I personally recommend, A.C.E. mixture.'

'Bloody hell, 'doc!,' roared the young Ltn. Richard Rapheal who was nearby, and who would be my replacement observer until Henderson returned - 'give us all an injection of that A.C.E. mixture then - and we'll give the Germans a right proper thrashing, to be awarded five kills each, to boot.' Here we all broke into a rowdy laugh, although the tepid 'doc responded merely with a smirk, explaining that the mixture consisted of alcohol, chloroform, and ether - and was the latest in anesthetising in all reputable medical institutions. 'Very well,' I responded, 'give me a shot of that for a day or two and, hopefully, I'll be able to sit out our longer flights.'

And the injections were none too soon, for already, very early on the 26th of May, we were urged by HQ into a bombing mission relatively deep on the enemy's side of the lines - we were to do a run at one of the enemy's 'dromes located north of Sint-Eloois-Winckle, since our intuitive C.O., Salmond Sr., had concluded that this was likely the home of several Aviatiks that would often be seen harrassing our observation balloons, and aeroplanes, while the latter were off on reconnoitering flights. It was not yet 5:30 in the morning when we were roused from sleep and told to 'step lively,' by one of the night orderlies. I had barely a few minutes to splash some cold water onto my face from the basin in the corner of our room, and was simultaneously dressing and running towards the flight office, first to assemble the men, and then to retire, very briefly, to the mess - for an improvised breakfast of hot tea and a few salty biscuits. Proper nourishment would have to wait until we returned. 'You think we'll be back around 8, Cap'n.?,' was Rapheal's question, a query that helped to awaken me more thoroughly than the tea did. 'Why, I suppose so, even earlier, if we don't loiter for too long over our targets, which I don't recommend in any circumstance' - this was the only response I could muster so early in the morning.

Soon after we were already ascending into the fine spring air, a tandem of Parasols, the other piloted by Ltn. Strugnell, and with each of us carrying four 20 kg bombs. We proceeded, on my orders, directly towards the lines, and briefly to irritate some of the German batteries southeast of Ypres. The weather was beautiful, with hardly a cloud in the expansive sky, and with only a light southwesterly wind that was manageable even in our Parasols. Noticed around the lines below were a few explosions, but, for the most part, the entire trellis-work of trenches still seemed largely asleep at this early hour of the morning. I signalled to Strugnell and he went in first, dropping two of his bombs on some of the enemy's dugouts in the vicinity. I then followed and did the same, dropping two of my bombs. We here circled a couple of times, jotting down coordinates for some of the enemy's positions - and then we proceeded further east, and agonizingly deep into unknown territory. We however knew approximately where the 'drome, our main target, would be located, and so we took advantage of the fairly lengthy flight to gain as much alt. as possible. By the time the enemy 'drome became visible, we were near 2000 m alt., and did several circles above the enemy's tents - to make sure that we were not being followed by any enemy aeroplanes.

Realizing that all was clear, I signalled once again and Ltn. Strugnell entered a shallow dive, descending to about 1500 m alt., whereupon he dropped his remaining two bombs - and that exploded near one of the aeroplanes parked far below. I then entered a shallow dive as well, dropped my remaining bombs, and observed two explosions soon after, in proximity of some back-buildings and sheds located slightly to the east of the aerodrome. At this point, I spotted a convoy of 10 lorries on one of the roads not too far from the German 'drome - my observer had also noticed this and signalled in the affirmative that he was keen to try out the Lewis M.G.

Strugnell, in the other Parasol, noted our change of direction and also followed. I idled the LeRhone and we headed for the smaller of the two convoys below, with six lorries further behind, and four clumped together, in front. I dove several times, with Strugnell keeping watch from above, and with Rapheal, an excellent shot, getting several hits on the first and second lorries, with smoke and debris noticed thereafter. We then did a wide, ascending turn, and Rapheal emptied the Lewis' drum into the remaining six lorries. 'This would do,' I here thought - and, with our ammo. exhausted, we now turned back for our own 'drome above Armentieres. The sky was still clear, wonderfully sunny, with a representatively spring morning developing. And, not being pestered by any of the enemy's ground fire - and as well with hardly any flak in this sector - we concentrated on getting back in one piece, soundly, and also as assured by the well-timed purring of our rotary engines.

The lines were passed at an alt. of about 1200 m, and soon we were descending towards our 'drome. I first dropped in, and rolled nicely to my hangar. Ltn. Strugnell's Parasol followed soon after. Several minutes later we had already removed our flight gear and were waiting to be served a more thorough breakfast, with the cool spring air of the higher altitudes having opened our appetites. The rest of the day proved uneventful, with Salmond Sr. wiring in information that some of the German batteries south of Ypres had been damaged in our bombing run, and that there was also minor damage reported to the enemy 'drome further behind the lines. I was pleased enough with these details but did not dwell too much on them. Rapheal and Strugnell decided on an afternoon swim at a nearby pond since it became blisteringly hot later in the day. I, on the other hand, and as ordered by the 'doc previously - was not to get my wound wet - so I took the opportunity to lay out some flight plans for our next sortie, and also engaged in some comforting speculations as I intermittently dozed off in a rocking chair that had been placed in the sun next to our mess. The choice of topic for my daydreaming came easily enough - it would be Clarissa's tantalizing invitation to her studio.
-----

Von S smile

[Linked Image]

Attached Files pic1.jpgpic2.jpgpic3.jpgpic4.jpgpic5.jpgpic6.jpgpic7.jpgpic8.jpg
Last edited by VonS; 05/26/20 02:51 AM. Reason: Embedded pic. for atmosphere.

// FE2 on a Mac (https://tinyurl.com/FE2onMac) // WOFF on a Mac (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFonMac) // FE2 FMs (https://tinyurl.com/FE2fms) // WOFF FMs (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFfms) // WOTR FMs (https://tinyurl.com/WOTRfms) // WOFF GPU Tuner (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFgputuner) // WOTR GPU Tuner (https://tinyurl.com/WOTRgputuner) // All VonS WOFF/WOTR mods. are tweaks of files that are © OBD Software. //
#4512839 - 03/26/20 01:21 PM Re: VonS "Casual Campaigns" WOFF Thread [Re: VonS]  
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L'Etoile du Nord
.

VonS, I just caught up on your pair of pilots and it was some very enjoyable reading. “Der blaue Eberhard”, that one made me laugh out loud. And to Captain Dobson’s dreams of the elegant lady attending to his wounded nether region, I’m thinking that scenario has been played out more than once in certain short films featuring “bow-chick-a-bow-bow” musical scores. Great screenies by the way.

.


[Linked Image]

Three RFC Brass Hats were strolling down a street in London. Two walked into a bar, the third one ducked.
_________________________________________________________________________

Former Cold War Warrior, USAF Security Service 1974-1978, E-4, Morse Systems Intercept, England, Europe, and points above.
"pippy-pahpah-pippy pah-pip-pah"

#4512883 - 03/26/20 05:35 PM Re: VonS "Casual Campaigns" WOFF Thread [Re: RAF_Louvert]  
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Originally Posted by RAF_Louvert
VonS, I just caught up on your pair of pilots and it was some very enjoyable reading. “Der blaue Eberhard”, that one made me laugh out loud. And to Captain Dobson’s dreams of the elegant lady attending to his wounded nether region, I’m thinking that scenario has been played out more than once in certain short films featuring “bow-chick-a-bow-bow” musical scores. Great screenies by the way


Glad these casual campaign tales are enjoyable. Lady Harbury is somewhat avant-garde so I look forward to introducing her further in some future escapades for Cap'n. Dobson. And indeed, Kiener managed to outdo Immelmann and Boelcke biggrin with his score of 10, already by Nov. of 1915 - thus the parallel history being developed there with the Blue Max medal. I might return to Kiener's adventures after a few more flights for the RFC.

If anything disastrous happens to Dobson and Kiener, I will then "formally" apply to join the real men in the DiD thread. cowboy

Von S


// FE2 on a Mac (https://tinyurl.com/FE2onMac) // WOFF on a Mac (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFonMac) // FE2 FMs (https://tinyurl.com/FE2fms) // WOFF FMs (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFfms) // WOTR FMs (https://tinyurl.com/WOTRfms) // WOFF GPU Tuner (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFgputuner) // WOTR GPU Tuner (https://tinyurl.com/WOTRgputuner) // All VonS WOFF/WOTR mods. are tweaks of files that are © OBD Software. //
#4513146 - 03/28/20 07:36 AM Re: VonS "Casual Campaigns" WOFF Thread [Re: VonS]  
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And the plot thickens for Cap'n. Dobson & Company...was tweaking the FM today for the Bristol Scout (the stock version is largely the "Type B" performance-wise)...to end up with the common production variant "Type C." Then I began wondering...how it sure would be good to give the good Captain one of these...for Eindecker hunting...the Parasols largely being limited to recon. and bombing.

So I go into the WOFF campaign menu, click to see the duty roster and aircraft types available...and May 27th of 1915 rolls in - and then this pleasant surprise pops up on screen smile. Hope to fly mission no. 12 soon.

Von S

[Linked Image]

Attached Files theplotthickens.jpg
Last edited by VonS; 03/28/20 07:37 AM. Reason: The plot thickens.

// FE2 on a Mac (https://tinyurl.com/FE2onMac) // WOFF on a Mac (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFonMac) // FE2 FMs (https://tinyurl.com/FE2fms) // WOFF FMs (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFfms) // WOTR FMs (https://tinyurl.com/WOTRfms) // WOFF GPU Tuner (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFgputuner) // WOTR GPU Tuner (https://tinyurl.com/WOTRgputuner) // All VonS WOFF/WOTR mods. are tweaks of files that are © OBD Software. //
#4514433 - 04/03/20 06:06 PM Re: VonS "Casual Campaigns" WOFF Thread [Re: VonS]  
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Mission No. 12 for Major Dobson & Company

(note: BB's clouds ver. 3 installed, "full weather" package; ver. 2.1 of JJJ's MultiMod in use; combo. 1.4/1.2/1.1.1 of the WOFF GPU Tuner patch active)

-----
The morning of the 27th of May was marked by various excitements, the first being that I was again roused from sleep very early, around 4:30 am, by one of our noisy orderlies. Still in a half-slumber and barely having enough time to dress into uniform, I was soon greeted by Sir Salmond Sr., who was giving us a look-over this day (a habit of his on occasion, to surprise us with such unannounced visits). I now envied Henderson whose leave had been extended from his initial 48 hrs.' pass to Paris, but we all held ourselves well enough, I thought, giving a positive overall impression of a well-functioning and disciplined 'drome - and in the anticipatory atmosphere I was as well informed that I had been promoted to Major.

This information came rather unexpectedly; I enquired as to why this was - with Salmond Sr. laughing off my comment and referencing the bombing of the German 'drome, the previous day, and well over enemy territory. Also cited was one of my previous escapades, with Salmond himself, and in which we afflicted the Pfalz factory south of Lens with considerable damage. 'Forward action and consistently so, as recommended!,' were Salmond's own words, which rang rather pleasantly in my ears this early in the morning. 'You will also find that a new aeroplane has been delivered, Major - and please do try your best not to wreck it - there is only a limited number of these Bristol Scouts, Type C, I think that is what they call them, but we hope that HQ will see value in them shortly. There is after all only so much that can be done with a Parasol, and we would much prefer to bring the fight closer to the enemy.' With these words Salmond was off to inspect our other 'drome in the vicinity of Armentieres, promising to visit again, and unexpectedly.

And, truth be told, my new 'crate was a thing of beauty indeed, with tight linen, the smell of lacquer still present, and a fresh coat of paint visible, to protect from the elements. According to reports, she was fast and with a good rate of climb, also easier to control than the sometimes cumbersome, sometimes wild, and idiosyncratic, Parasol. I engaged in some brief inspection, with my fitter and rigger, to see that all was sound - and then it was off to the mess for a spot of tea and biscuits before ascending into the fragrant morning air. Today I was to accompany Sgt. Aldridge and his observer, in their Parasol, to the German batteries north of Vimy, and I was assigned to loiter there briefly while the Parasol noted positions of the enemy's dugouts and direction of fall of shot. All seemed simple enough, and the flight began rather well, with my Scout climbing beautifully and displaying no noticeable difficulty in control. It was a much sportier bird than the Parasol and I frequently found myself flying at four-fifths throttle, so that Aldridge would not fall too far behind, or below.

A touch north of the River Lys, however, and at an alt. of about 1500 m, the Sgt. fired a yellow Verey light, to inform me of trouble with his LeRhone. I circled for a while in the vicinity, with Aldridge again signalling that he would remain in the area for some time, to ascertain further the condition of the rotary - before deciding on a more direct course of action. This appeared sufficient enough for me and I kindly waived them off - proceeding further south on what had by now become a lone flight - although, I must admit, I was not terribly concerned with the solitary nature of the mission from this point on, considering that the Bristol was proving an absolute joy to fly. I floated south and entered onto the German side of the lines slightly east of Neuve-Chapelle, to head towards the enemy's batteries that were below. Already I was near 2000 m alt., with the still, morning air providing for a comfortable flight. Although there were scattered clouds, hardly any winds were felt or noticed, and, with the sun glistening on the dew-covered meadows below - one could very easily begin to daydream.

I nonetheless remembered to crane my neck at regular intervals, to observe for enemy aeroplanes, but there was nothing to be seen for miles on end. Most likely the German flyers were still soundly asleep - I grudgingly thought - although the continuously well-tamed behavior of my Scout quickly extinguished any further, negative thoughts on my part and I focused on the area south of Lens, being aware, from previous flights to this sector, that it would often be populated by gasbags. I idled the rotary at about one-third power and descended quickly, testing the Scout's robustness and finding that it dove rather well, much more effectively and with greater stability than the Parasol. Soon, I was below the layer of scattered clouds and made my way cautiously even further south - whereupon was spotted a German balloon near Vimy and that looked like those white sausages the enemy is often fond of eating, with a plentiful supply of pickled cabbages. This would be an excellent test of the Scout, I here thought, for its armament was interestingly positioned, the Lewis M.G. jutting out slightly from the cockpit and to my left at 25 degrees or so, to clear the outer disc of the revolving propeller. Somewhat odd to aim, but I was ready for a challenge and found that with liberal application of rudder, and opposite aileron, one could give the enemy a good peppering from the M.G. In this way I attacked the balloon - with it lighting up rather quickly and smoking profusely, before deflating and sinking onto the pock-marked ground below.

Satisfied with this experiment, I immediately plotted for our lines and went over at an alt. of about 1500 m, and slightly northeast of Arras. Soon I entered a gradual, descending turn to the right and alighted, about 15 minutes later, at a small aerodrome, full of RFC Parasols, and slightly south and to the west of Mont-St-Eloi. It had proven wise to land here for I was somewhat short on petrol after the lengthy flight south, and, while the Bristol was being refueled and ogled by the local fitters - I wired in my balloon claim to Bailleul Asylum. The local C.O. here was currently on leave and was being replaced by a good-natured Ltn., Simonson, who invited me for a hearty and late breakfast in the mess. Kindly I obliged, for I had some time to spare before returning to our own 'drome, and, besides, Simonson was eager to discuss my initial impressions of the Scout Type C.

He had some brief experience in the Type B, earlier in the year, and remembered well its favorable characteristics - although he found the rudder somewhat sluggish and ineffective. 'The rudder is just fine now, Ltn., most sensitive,' I commented - 'the Type C is an improvement.' Several hours were in this way spent, discussing the Scout and Parasol, and comparing them to various other works of motoring and natural art, for Simonson was an amateur painter - and our topics ranged from sporting automobiles such as the Mercer Raceabout and thoroughbred race horses to the latest developments in aerofoil design, and how such improvements would hopefully push us ahead of our perpetually crafty and inventive enemy.
-----

Von S smile

[Linked Image]

Attached Files pic2.jpgpic3.jpgpic4.jpgpic5.jpgpic6.jpgpic7.jpgpic8.jpgMercurial.jpg
Last edited by VonS; 05/26/20 02:57 AM. Reason: Embedded pic. for atmosphere.

// FE2 on a Mac (https://tinyurl.com/FE2onMac) // WOFF on a Mac (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFonMac) // FE2 FMs (https://tinyurl.com/FE2fms) // WOFF FMs (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFfms) // WOTR FMs (https://tinyurl.com/WOTRfms) // WOFF GPU Tuner (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFgputuner) // WOTR GPU Tuner (https://tinyurl.com/WOTRgputuner) // All VonS WOFF/WOTR mods. are tweaks of files that are © OBD Software. //
#4514445 - 04/03/20 07:22 PM Re: VonS "Casual Campaigns" WOFF Thread [Re: VonS]  
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VonS - I am really enjoying the unfolding story. Keep up the excellent work. I look forward to more


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'BWOC BWOC BWOC'
#4514453 - 04/03/20 07:57 PM Re: VonS "Casual Campaigns" WOFF Thread [Re: VonS]  
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Great stuff VonS,keep up the great work pal


"Vis unita fortior"

"United Strength is Stronger"
#4514455 - 04/03/20 08:04 PM Re: VonS "Casual Campaigns" WOFF Thread [Re: VonS]  
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I'm also enjoying it, Thank you!

#4514469 - 04/03/20 08:46 PM Re: VonS "Casual Campaigns" WOFF Thread [Re: VonS]  
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Nice story, VonS.

Hopefully, the weather will continue to cooperate, although I have a feeling that will not be the case!

#4514530 - 04/04/20 03:20 AM Re: VonS "Casual Campaigns" WOFF Thread [Re: VonS]  
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Thank you everyone for the kind words - WOFF is wonderfully immersive and I look forward to more adventures with the Bristol Scout. Will be interesting to compare it with the Fokk. E.II flown by Kiener. Already it flies much more nicely. The Eindecker is always a handful - tweaked FM or not.

@ BB, considering the realism of your "full weather" clouds upgrade, I'm sure that I will be in rain, winds, and overcast skies very soon. Looking forward to the bad weather! biggrin

(I will include the FM tweak for the Bristol Scout Type C with a ver. 5.0 of the FM update pack, sometime in the coming months - no official release date yet since I want to comb over the Nieups. 17 and 24, and will visit the M-S and Pfalz Parasols too, since I will have more free time then.)

Hope to fly mission no. 13 for Major Dobson soon, then another couple of missions for the RFC before switching to Bosta 2 and the northernmost sector of the front.

An excellent sim for building a novel...providing these two campaigns last long enough - I'll then have to decide on a title that maintains the spirit of the 1910s as much as I've attempted to do with the diction in the reports. smile

Perhaps something like:

Master Caligula's Easy Chair: Tales of WW1 Aerial Heroes and Their Escapades for the Armchair Enthusiast

or

Lady Harbury's Burlesque Studio: Wild Days and Nights Above the Trenches of the Great War

Von S


// FE2 on a Mac (https://tinyurl.com/FE2onMac) // WOFF on a Mac (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFonMac) // FE2 FMs (https://tinyurl.com/FE2fms) // WOFF FMs (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFfms) // WOTR FMs (https://tinyurl.com/WOTRfms) // WOFF GPU Tuner (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFgputuner) // WOTR GPU Tuner (https://tinyurl.com/WOTRgputuner) // All VonS WOFF/WOTR mods. are tweaks of files that are © OBD Software. //
#4514550 - 04/04/20 09:25 AM Re: VonS "Casual Campaigns" WOFF Thread [Re: VonS]  
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Excellent so far Von s, setting a standard I can only dream of! Very enjoyable thank you

#4515071 - 04/07/20 07:37 AM Re: VonS "Casual Campaigns" WOFF Thread [Re: VonS]  
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Originally Posted by VonS
Mission No. 3 for Hauptmann Kiener

(note: GPU Tuner Patch 1.4/1.2/1.1.1 combo. in place; also BB's optional clouds ver 2.9.2 being used and they work fine in the platinum ed. of WOFF, have spotted no problems so far; as well used is JJJ's Multimod ver. 2.1)



Guys, do you know if BB's Optional Clouds Mod is compatible with Cloud Popping fix by HarryH?

Thanks.

#4515079 - 04/07/20 08:10 AM Re: VonS "Casual Campaigns" WOFF Thread [Re: VonS]  
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I'm afraid it is not compatible with VonS's GPU Tuner Mod as it also modifies preload.xml

Thanks.

#4515129 - 04/07/20 02:47 PM Re: VonS "Casual Campaigns" WOFF Thread [Re: VonS]  
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My mod and Harry's work just fine with each other, I'm not sure about Harry's and VonS's.

#4515145 - 04/07/20 04:15 PM Re: VonS "Casual Campaigns" WOFF Thread [Re: Dirk98]  
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Originally Posted by Dirk98
I'm afraid it is not compatible with VonS's GPU Tuner Mod as it also modifies preload.xml

Thanks.


For those using HarryH's cloud pop fix, I recommend loading it first via JSGME, and then loading my GPU Tuner patch for WOFF - this way you will get the benefits of the cloud pop mod and my tuner patch - since the preload.xml file that my patch loads works just fine with the cloud pop mod (it is just a minor expansion/modification of the preload file that comes with HarryH's fix). Simply override Harry's preload file with mine - and you should have no compatibility problems (don't forget to remove my mod first, then Harry's, when upgrading to newer ver. patches of WOFF).

Hope to fly mission no. 13 soon in the Scout Type C.

Von S smile

Last edited by VonS; 04/07/20 04:18 PM. Reason: Added info.

// FE2 on a Mac (https://tinyurl.com/FE2onMac) // WOFF on a Mac (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFonMac) // FE2 FMs (https://tinyurl.com/FE2fms) // WOFF FMs (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFfms) // WOTR FMs (https://tinyurl.com/WOTRfms) // WOFF GPU Tuner (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFgputuner) // WOTR GPU Tuner (https://tinyurl.com/WOTRgputuner) // All VonS WOFF/WOTR mods. are tweaks of files that are © OBD Software. //
#4515413 - 04/09/20 02:10 AM Re: VonS "Casual Campaigns" WOFF Thread [Re: VonS]  
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Adger Offline
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Again thanks for your tweaks VonS they really are an excellent addition.
I was wondering if you could give me some advice? I noticed that you mentioned that you've put "tree congestion has been slightly thinned out in this patch (by about 10-15%) from stock"

If i wanted to add some extra trees (i know id lose some fps) then in what file would i add them? Also i use V1.1.1 v1.3 and v1.4 would i have to change a file in the latest JSGME setting (1.4)? Thanks in advance for any reply VonS
Cheers Adger


"Vis unita fortior"

"United Strength is Stronger"
#4515422 - 04/09/20 04:33 AM Re: VonS "Casual Campaigns" WOFF Thread [Re: Adger]  
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VonS Offline
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Originally Posted by Adger
Again thanks for your tweaks VonS they really are an excellent addition.
I was wondering if you could give me some advice? I noticed that you mentioned that you've put "tree congestion has been slightly thinned out in this patch (by about 10-15%) from stock"

If i wanted to add some extra trees (i know id lose some fps) then in what file would i add them? Also i use V1.1.1 v1.3 and v1.4 would i have to change a file in the latest JSGME setting (1.4)? Thanks in advance for any reply VonS
Cheers Adger


Glad the WOFF Tuner Patch is proving so helpful Adger. In terms of tree congestion, two ways to toggle that. The easy way is simply to increase forest/tree density in the main WOFF menu from medium to full - but I have no idea what kind of an impact that will have on fps - have always left that setting at medium.

The other, more subtle way is to tinker with the last numbers in the budget rings entries of the compositescenerybudgets file, located in the terrain folder, of my Tuner Patch. For example, since you are using ver. 1.3, that changes the compositescenery numbers already provided in ver. 1.1.1 that needs to be installed for the other addons to work - ver. 1.4, on the other hand, changes the compositetexturebudgets file provided in the main ver. 1.1.1 patch. So, in your case, the relevant entry from the ver. 1.3 compositescenerybudgets file (which is the one you want to tinker with) is as follows:

-----
<Budget Name="One">
<Rings AboveGroundLevel="0" MaxDistEyeInnerRing="0">
<Ring PatchWorldDim="2048" RingDim="10" LOD="17" MajorDensity="0.00001" />
<Ring PatchWorldDim="1024" RingDim="17" LOD="50" MajorDensity="0.00004" />
<Ring PatchWorldDim="512" RingDim="15" LOD="70" MajorDensity="0.00011" />
<Ring PatchWorldDim="256" RingDim="11" LOD="90" MajorDensity="0.00013" />
<Ring PatchWorldDim="128" RingDim="12" LOD="100" MajorDensity="0.00015"/>
</Rings>
</Budget>
<Budget Name="Two">
<Rings AboveGroundLevel="0" MaxDistEyeInnerRing="0">
<Ring PatchWorldDim="2048" RingDim="11" LOD="17" MajorDensity="0.00002" />
<Ring PatchWorldDim="1024" RingDim="17" LOD="50" MajorDensity="0.00005" />
<Ring PatchWorldDim="512" RingDim="14" LOD="70" MajorDensity="0.00013" />
<Ring PatchWorldDim="256" RingDim="11" LOD="90" MajorDensity="0.00015" />
<Ring PatchWorldDim="128" RingDim="11" LOD="100" MajorDensity="0.00017"/>
</Rings>
</Budget>
<Budget Name="Three">
<Rings AboveGroundLevel="0" MaxDistEyeInnerRing="0">
<Ring PatchWorldDim="2048" RingDim="11" LOD="17" MajorDensity="0.00003"/>
<Ring PatchWorldDim="1024" RingDim="13" LOD="50" MajorDensity="0.00008"/>
<Ring PatchWorldDim="512" RingDim="20" LOD="70" MajorDensity="0.00011"/>
<Ring PatchWorldDim="256" RingDim="13" LOD="90" MajorDensity="0.00015"/>
<Ring PatchWorldDim="128" RingDim="11" LOD="100" MajorDensity="0.00018"/>
<Ring PatchWorldDim="64" RingDim="10" LOD="110" MajorDensity="0.00019"/>
</Rings>
</Budget>
<Budget Name="Four">
<Rings AboveGroundLevel="0" MaxDistEyeInnerRing="0">
<Ring PatchWorldDim="2048" RingDim="11" LOD="17" MajorDensity="0.00004"/>
<Ring PatchWorldDim="1024" RingDim="13" LOD="30" MajorDensity="0.00008"/>
<Ring PatchWorldDim="512" RingDim="20" LOD="50" MajorDensity="0.00012"/>
<Ring PatchWorldDim="256" RingDim="20" LOD="70" MajorDensity="0.00016"/>
<Ring PatchWorldDim="128" RingDim="18" LOD="90" MajorDensity="0.00018"/>
<Ring PatchWorldDim="64" RingDim="13" LOD="100" MajorDensity="0.00020"/>
<Ring PatchWorldDim="32" RingDim="11" LOD="110" MajorDensity="0.00021"/>
</Rings>
</Budget>
<Budget Name="Five">
<Rings AboveGroundLevel="0" MaxDistEyeInnerRing="0">
<Ring PatchWorldDim="2048" RingDim="10" LOD="17" MajorDensity="0.00006"/>
<Ring PatchWorldDim="1024" RingDim="13" LOD="30" MajorDensity="0.00009"/>
<Ring PatchWorldDim="512" RingDim="19" LOD="50" MajorDensity="0.00013"/>
<Ring PatchWorldDim="256" RingDim="19" LOD="70" MajorDensity="0.00017"/>
<Ring PatchWorldDim="128" RingDim="17" LOD="90" MajorDensity="0.00019"/>
<Ring PatchWorldDim="64" RingDim="11" LOD="100" MajorDensity="0.00021"/>
<Ring PatchWorldDim="32" RingDim="10" LOD="110" MajorDensity="0.00022"/>
</Rings>
</Budget>
-----

The density values in the various budget levels are already a bit more "congested" in ver. 1.3 than in the ver. 1.1.1 compositescenerybudgets file, and especially so when compared with the ver. 1.2 file - but if you want to tinker further, I recommend increasing each of the "majordensity" values by a number of about "0.00002" or "0.00003." This, for example, will give you majordensity numbers, for budget ring level one, of:

<Ring PatchWorldDim="2048" RingDim="10" LOD="17" MajorDensity="0.00003" />
<Ring PatchWorldDim="1024" RingDim="17" LOD="50" MajorDensity="0.00006" />
<Ring PatchWorldDim="512" RingDim="15" LOD="70" MajorDensity="0.00013" />
<Ring PatchWorldDim="256" RingDim="11" LOD="90" MajorDensity="0.00015" />
<Ring PatchWorldDim="128" RingDim="12" LOD="100" MajorDensity="0.00017"/>

Take note however that such tweaks may result in a slight fps hit when compared with the unmodified, possible fps numbers for my patch. Also possible is that micro-stutters may be reintroduced. And, most of all, tree density may not so much be increased as the distance to which trees are seen - for noticeable increase in tree density, we have to toggle again the forest/tree congestion in the main WOFF menu to a higher setting (which I avoid tinkering with).

Anyway, hope you can get desired tree congestion/viewing distance with the tweaks suggested above. (I won't tinker anymore with the Tuner Patch myself since I don't want to reintroduce any oddities.)

Von S smile

NOTE: Don't forget to unload the Tuner Patch in JSGME before modifying the relevant compositescenerybudgets file, and before loading it up again.

Last edited by VonS; 04/09/20 04:59 AM. Reason: Fixed typos.

// FE2 on a Mac (https://tinyurl.com/FE2onMac) // WOFF on a Mac (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFonMac) // FE2 FMs (https://tinyurl.com/FE2fms) // WOFF FMs (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFfms) // WOTR FMs (https://tinyurl.com/WOTRfms) // WOFF GPU Tuner (https://tinyurl.com/WOFFgputuner) // WOTR GPU Tuner (https://tinyurl.com/WOTRgputuner) // All VonS WOFF/WOTR mods. are tweaks of files that are © OBD Software. //
#4515447 - 04/09/20 11:19 AM Re: VonS "Casual Campaigns" WOFF Thread [Re: VonS]  
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,205
Adger Offline
Member
Adger  Offline
Member

Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,205
As always a massive thanks VonS,I'm going to have a tinker about later cheers for your detailed explanation pal.


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"United Strength is Stronger"
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