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#4494882 - 10/27/19 09:15 PM Why I Am Insistent On Upgrading One's Computer  
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Initially posted elsewhere. Posted here as potentially useful information. YMMV.

While I tend to be long-winded, may I suggest that you read on? Might be worth your while.....

Today, I installed BoB II (Wings of Victory) into my Win 10 computer, along with a specific patch which is intended to allow running the game on win 10. It seems (with some little investigation) to have allowed the game to run properly.

Why am I posting this here, in an EAW forum? Because the fundamental lessons learned are valuable ones, and pertain to EAW users.

When I investigated the Graphics settings within the game on the win 10 computer, the game had set almost all the Gfx settings on the maximum level possible. When I compared these same game-set settings to my very inferior Win 7 computer, I found that quite a few Gfx settings could not be set to max, and some not near max. Comparing the same game, win 7 versus win 10, revealed that the game looked MUCH better and played at least as well in Win 10.

This is the second experience I have had in playing old games suitably modified for playing on Win 10. See my posts here about Crimson Skies game. This is the second--of two--old games that I have successfully installed into Win 10, and which games looked and played a LOT better than in Win 7.

Now, the fundamental point to all this IS NOT that the games be able to be played on Win 10. That is another, important issue; Another topic.

What IS pertinent is that my win 10 machine has a fairly modern CPU, a fairly modern Graphics card, and is running on SSDs.
Since my Win 7 machine also runs on SSDs, and has a decent, but ancient, Core 2 Duo CPU, and a vintage Nvidia GT 730 Gfx card, and since the Gfx features on the win 7 computer are relatively limited vice the Win 10 computer, I have come to some tentative conclusions.

On the Win 10 computer, either the vastly better CPU (8th Gen I7), and/or the equally, and vastly better Nvidia 2060 OC PRO Gfx card allow the inherent Gfx features to become available to the user. Even on these vintage games. Obviously the Win 7 computer, as configured, disallows many Gfx features, and the Win 10 computer allows such. I don't know the point in-between these two end points wherein lies the "sweet spot", but I reckon that "spot" is moving upwards, all the time, in order to accommodate modern games.

That said, Win 7 computer users might want to investigate whether or not their CPU can be upgraded to a more modern one, and whether their Gfx card can be upgraded. Gfx card major upgrade will probably involve a Power Supply Unit (PSU) upgrade. Your old Win 7 computer might, or might not, be able to be upgraded to a point where the Gfx features of these old games will be fully accessible.

The physical dimensions/configuration of your existing win 7 computer is a factor. My Win 7 computer is a Small Form Factor, and thus quite limited in the allowable upgrades to its components. Those having much larger computers, such as tower computers, might find upgrading of various components much easier. My Win 10 computer, unlike my Win 7 computer, has the internal room to allow upgrading the Gfx card, and the required PSU. I bought it for that exact reason.

In sum, the fairly decent Win 7 computer I have is upgraded to its' max. It's old, and if the CPU fails, it is not replaceable, since it is permanently attached to the MoBo. My win 10 computer runs all vintage games that I can find/install/patch at full-on Gfx settings, and that difference is VERY apparent while looking at the monitor. The win 10 computer has never stuttered even with IL-2 with full-on Gfx settings. With some games, the enabling of ALL inherent Gfx features has been visually stunning. Other games a detectable improvement.

.So, even if staying within the win 7 universe, consider upgrading your existing computer to handle FAR better CPUs and FAR better Gfx cards. I suggest some investigating at the following link, as they are quite objective, and pull no punches: https://www.tomshardware.com/

I have personally replaced CPUs and installed cloned SSDs (in place of the former HDDs) in my computers, including my laptop. If I can do it, so can you. If reluctant, such improvements are easily and inexpensively done by your competent computer guy. Note that accessing the computer's drive unit is fairly simple, and accessing the CPU requires some further digging. So, upgrading the CPU makes a upgrade of the drive a more-or-less simple thing.

Based on my personal experiences with games formerly played on Win 7 system, and the same games being played on Win 10 system, the difference in the visual results can be dramatic. It goes without saying that with the modern computer, game "'stuttering" is a thing of the past. I attribute most of this to the modern Gfx card, which the new Power Supply allows, Your Win 7 system, intelligently upgraded, can give you visual results, and frame rates, heretofore unobtainable.

Submitted for your consideration.

Last edited by RIBob; 12/27/19 12:05 AM.
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#4495883 - 11/03/19 10:12 PM Re: Why I Am Insistent On Upgrading One's Computer [Re: RIBob]  
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Following my own advice, and also putting my money where my mouth is, so to speak, I am taking my Dell OptiPlex 790 SFF computer out of storage, and upgrading it. As-is, it has an (upgraded) 2nd gen I7 CPU, and (also upgraded) 16 GB RAM This might be a fair replication of the computers many users of EAW are now using. Or maybe not. Can't help that; it's what I have on-hand, and with which to experiment.

I would caution any and all computer users that using any computer configuration other than a "tower" style can seriously reduce one's possible choice of upgrade components. My SSF (Small Form Factor)-related upgrades will (hopefully) not show size (SFF) related constraints that other computer uses might encounter. I would suggest NEVER buying any sort of computer that is less than full-size "tower" type computer, in order to retain vital, future, upgrading options. In short, NEVER buy another computer that is not a full-scale Tower computer. Tower computers allow many upgrades. SFF factor computers allow very few.

.l propose upgrading my stored Win 7 Pro OPSys computer with initial upgrades with a 2 Tb SSD, and also install a secondary 2 Tb SSD, as there are connections for such. The benefits of SSD vice HDD have long been settled, with the SSDs being wholly superior in every way. Granted, upgrading to SSDs is an expense, but also allows much faster access speeds. At my age, I have little time to waste. How much is your wasted time worth?

Where I will be sticking my neck out a little bit is installing an Nvidia GTX 1050 Ti graphics card, which is vastly better than the Nvidia GT 730 Gfx card currently used in my Win 7 computer. The 1050I is quite on the edge as to power requirements, but I have some info that it will do, especially given the reduced power requirements of the SSDs vice the former HDDs.

For those considering upgrading their computers: It's all a balancing act between how much power your Power Supply Unit (PSU) provides, how much power your GFX card draws, and how much power your CPU draws--that is taken as a whole along with the MotherBoard requirements. PSU Wattage power MUST exceed the Watteage power of the components which draw power from the PSU, with at least a 10% allowance

Power supplies are often upgradeable, depending on one's computer Buy the best you can afford. Cheap PSUs run the risk of failure, or worse, a fire. I decided on a Seasonics 600W Platinum fanless unit, for another computer, and it has worked flawlessly. DO NOT cheap-out on this component. In short, have enough power to run things, with at least 10% unallocated overhead.

For this budget re-vamping, I am using the OEM 240W (non-upgradeable) PSU, and hoping my Gfx card info is reliable. We'll see. I know the Nvidis GT 1030 Gfx card will work in this application, but the Nvidia GT 1050 has a LOT more capability vice the 1030.

All the above said, note that I still retain the Nvidia GT 730 Gfx card, and the Nvidia GT 1030 cards as backups, in case the Nvidia 1050 card fails to work. Always nice to have backups.

I'll update, as time allows. Stay tuned.

Last edited by RIBob; 11/08/19 07:10 PM.
#4496109 - 11/05/19 06:57 PM Re: Why I Am Insistent On Upgrading One's Computer [Re: RIBob]  
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Thank you for a lot of very useful technical information.

#4496552 - 11/08/19 07:08 PM Re: Why I Am Insistent On Upgrading One's Computer [Re: SkyHigh]  
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Originally Posted by SkyHigh
Thank you for a lot of very useful technical information.


Thank you, Sir! I hope the info contained in this thread will be of some use.

To continue, the following is a link that is concerned with stress-testing computers: https://www.pcworld.com/article/202...how-to-stress-test-your-pc-hardware.html

Performing such tests will reveal weak points in one's computer, and if such are present, will also suggest possible improvements. Such might be as elementary as simple wire-re-routing to provide better cooling air flow, perhaps the installation of additional fans are required, or even liquid cooling.

A very basic evaluation of one's Power Supply Unit is to connect an in-line $20 "Kill-A-Watt" meter to your computer's power cord, and then run your most demanding game, with everything set to the max. If your wattage draw is no more than 90% of the max wattage output of your PSU, you should be OK. The max output wattage of your PSU will be written somewhere on it. Rely on no other figure other than what is printed on your PSU.

The "Kill-A-Watt" meter is an essential tool for those who wish to know which devices use how much power, and when such power is consumed. Sometimes surprising sources of energy wastage can be discovered. The "Kill-A-Watt meter is a very useful tool.


Last edited by RIBob; 11/08/19 07:22 PM.
#4497784 - 11/20/19 07:28 PM Re: Why I Am Insistent On Upgrading One's Computer [Re: RIBob]  
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I'll be keeping an eye out for updates as I have recently started toying with the idea of either a new build or "tweaking" a decent SFF that I have. Looking forward to finding out how it goes for you.


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#4498772 - 11/30/19 12:11 PM Re: Why I Am Insistent On Upgrading One's Computer [Re: RIBob]  
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dBeav. I amusing this thread to let you know that I can no longer connect to the 352nd site, even with the VPN running.

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#4499110 - 12/03/19 08:38 PM Re: Why I Am Insistent On Upgrading One's Computer [Re: MrJelly]  
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NOTE: I am neither an electrician nor a computer whiz. The remarks below are for comparison and informational purposes only, and they reflect what happened on my equipment. Use at your own risk.

After performing some limited, preliminary, tests on a couple of different computers, it would seem that the two games I tested, the BAT version of !L-2 1946, and Crimson Skies (Widescreen) do not move the power requirement "needle" much above simple idle. The games were allowed to set their own Gfx "preferences".

For example, a Dell 760 SFF OptiPlex with Intel Core 2 Duo CPU, Nvidia 730 Gfx card (49W max draw), and 240 W Power supply, idled at about 66W. Playing BAT raised wattage requirements to 102W, Crimson skies to 99W.

On the Dell XPS computer, with I7 8700 CPU, Nvidia 2060 OC Pro Gfx card, and 600W Power supply, idle was 72W, BAT was 75 W, and CS was 78W, which, incidentally seems to confirm that the new 2060 Gfx card allows some gfx features formerly unavailable with lesser Gfx cards.

I attribute the variance of wattage draw between the two computers as being due to the GT 730 Gfx card having to work "harder", and so drawing more power than the 2060 card, which easily played both games without breaking a sweat.

There are certainly games which demand more of one's power supply than the ones I tested. However, I was surprised at how little of the available power supply was used. by these particular combinations of games/Gfx cards. YMMV.

The real test will be when I install an Nvidia GTX 1050 Ti Gfx card (75W max draw) into a Dell OptiPlex 790 SFF computer with the same 240W Power supply as the Dell 760 mentioned above. Since the 1050 Ti card only requires an additional 26W vice the 760, given the "headroom" available, this should not be a significant issue, IMHO I should add my testing seems to indicate that there is sufficient wattage "headroom" to do so. The Nvidia 1030 card which currently resides there goes into the 760 OptiPlex because it is a definite upgrade, AND, it actually has a smaller Wattage draw then the 730 GFX card: 30W Vs. 49W.

Submitted for your consideration.

Last edited by RIBob; 12/03/19 08:40 PM.
#4499294 - 12/05/19 11:28 PM Re: Why I Am Insistent On Upgrading One's Computer [Re: RIBob]  
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I have a couple to work with, an HP s5-1210t and an HP 6305 Pro, both SFF. So you have my attention.


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#4499384 - 12/07/19 12:22 AM Re: Why I Am Insistent On Upgrading One's Computer [Re: dBeav]  
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Well, I am no expert, but I suggest you begin by obtaining from the mfr the appropriate Owner/User/Shop manuals for your computers. They ought to be downloadable. What you are looking for is a complete set of specs on both computers. In particular, you want to find out the size (in Watts) of the Power Supply Unit, whether or not the CPU is upgradeable, and the max amount of RAM, and its' specific type.

I am assuming that since you specified SFF computers, the Graphics cards will necessarily be of Half-Height configuration; Half-Height being typical as regards SFF computers You will need to look inside your computer, and measure the LENGTH of the bay into which a new computer Graphics card will fit, and ensure that your new card is not too long. Keep this measurement handy when considering new GFX cards.

I also assume your SFF computers have storage drives that are of SATA-type. If you have older type storage drives, then I suggest you not proceed further in considering upgrades. if you have SATA type storage drives, then the first logical upgrade would be to a Solid State Storage Drive (SSD). This will speed up everything, and is probably the first upgrade to consider. Tom's hardware has some evaluations of such drives. Rummage around there via the link provided. Such SSDs will tend to draw a little less power than the old-fashioned Hard drives, and with SFF computers and their limited power supplies, this can be important.

The max power requirements of Gfx cards can be had from their mfr. The Nvidia 1030 is pretty low-power draw, but a fairly good card. The Nvidia 1050 TI draws a bit more power, but is a much better card. I don't know about AMD Gfx cards, but I assume a similar situation. Be advised that Gfx cards that will physically fit into SFF computers are nowhere near cutting edge, but neither is their price.

See Tom's Gfx Card Hierarchy https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gpu-hierarchy,4388.html for ratings of many common Gfx cards. Be advised that as far as Nvidia cards go, the 1050 TI, and the 1030 cards are available in Half-Height (SFF) configuration. They are also Single Bay cards, so that only one port is used. You should ensure, before buying a GFX card that it comes with a Half-Height metal bracket, which bracket interfaces with the ports in the back of your computer. ETA, the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1650 4GB has a better rating than the 1050Ti, and the same Wattage requirement.

In sum, you are mostly limited by physical space available within the SFF computer, by your power supply unit's wattage, by your computer's CPU, and by the type and amount of RAM. I suggest that one of your computers will prove to be a better candidate for upgrading than the other, although I could be wrong. In the final analysis, even a decent SFF computer, with considerable upgrading, will ultimately be limited by its SFF nature, and all that such size limitation entails. There is some point where upgrading SFF computers runs into a roadblock of some sort, and one can go no further without beginning to waste money. Intelligently (and economically) upgrading SFF computers one already owns is one thing, but generally speaking, such upgrades are very limited for SFF computers. I bought a much more modern tower-type computer simply for the reason that the Gfx cards I wanted required more physical space than any SFF computer offered, and such tower configuration also offered many choices in good, high-wattage PSUs. Of course, the modern tower computer modern has a late version I7 CPU, and up to 64 Gb Ram.

Without an adequate PSU to power everything, you are very limited in everything else. So find out what you've got for a PSU, and we can then explore options.

Last edited by RIBob; 12/07/19 12:41 AM.
#4499591 - 12/09/19 12:20 AM Re: Why I Am Insistent On Upgrading One's Computer [Re: RIBob]  
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Just did some testing today with the 790 Dell OptiPlex SFF computer. It has an (upgraded) I7 2600 3.4 Ghz CPU, 16 Gb RAM, and is running Win 10 Prox64 Operating System.

First series of tests were done with the Nvidia GT 1030 GPU.
Idle: 32W
Wings of Prey (a variant of IL-2): 93 W

This was merely to establish a baseline, and so far, so good.

I then installed the Nvidia 1050 Ti GPU, which has considerably more power draw. The question was: Will it work in this computer with the non-upgradeable 240 W PSU?

Idle: 50 W.

Using the downloadable "MSI Kombustor" stress-test program, I tested the GPU at the "Medium++" level, which is to say, about 95% GPU usage. Wattage use was 182 W,, which is well below the desired Upper wattage limit of 192W (240W-10%=192W (IOW, 90% of PSU capacity). This is nominally a 75W GPU, so even running it at 100%, the wattage required will still be within desired limits. This program deliberately stress-tests the entire computer, GPU being a particular focus. I have yet to test a Flight Sim that comes close to making demands on the computer that a "stress test" requires.

I also installed and upgraded the old MS Crimson Skies game, so that it will run properly on Win 10. I regret that my notes are incomplete as to its Wattage use, but IIRC the wattage used was approx in the low 90s. I'll revise this figure tomorrow, if need be.

To my delight, the GTX 1050 Ti card made available the "Shadows" and "Ground Clutter" features, heretofore unobtainable with an Nvidia GT 730 GPU, even on my 10-year old Samsung 1920x1080 native res monitor. Along with having all the other Gfx features set at Max, these additional gfx features really transform the visual aspect of this old sim. The result is a pleasure to view, and some of the vids on YouTube show the "Shadows" features, if you look for them.

So, this is the entire point of my upgrading exercise so far. Some intelligent upgrading can be done even to SFF computers. Such upgrading will likely allow the use of Gfx features that were formerly not accessible, and not over-stress the components of the computer. Almost certainly, intelligent upgrading will distinctly enhance one's computer's performance, and so one's enjoyment of one's sims..

ETA: Brand-new official copies of Wiin 7 PRO are available on the web for about $30 or so. This is the complete kit, with Authentication code, disks, and so forth. If you are considering moving all your stuff off an old, non-upgradeable, soon-to-fail Win 7 computer, you will definitely need a Wiin 7 Opsys that is dedicated to your new computer. Food for thought.

FWIW, I have a Win 10 PRO MASTER SSD on my gaming computer, and a Win 7 PRO SLAVE SSD hooked up as well; both x64 types. Initial trials have shown that most sims installed on the Win 7 SLAVE drive run fine. I don't know why this works, but I suspect the designation of the Win 10 drive as MASTER (boot) drive, and the Win 7 drive as SLAVE drive has something to do with it. No expert.

ETA 2:

I have not tested the Nvidia GTX 1650 card, but it also has a wattage limit of 75W, and ought to fit into a SFF computer, although it requires 2 bays. It is a bit longer than the 1050 Ti card, so some finagling of cables and such might be required. Apparently it is about 30% faster than the aforementioned GTX 1050 Ti card that I tested. The 1650 LP card is the most advanced low-power, low-profile Gfx card available for computers using low-wattage PSUs--at least as far as I am aware. I would expect it to draw a bit more power than the 1050 Ti card, but my testing suggests that the 1650 card will be OK even for a 240W PSU. YMMV. The 1650 is almost certainly the best low-power, half-height Gfx card for SFF computers which are typically limited as to their PSUs.

Be aware that you will want to ensure that your card comes with a "low-profile" metal bracket, although one can cut the excess off a long-style bracket, if need be. What is important to note is whether or not the card is overclocked from the mfr (usually denoted by "OC" in the game's official description) AND whether or not the card has a "Display Port" connection for video output. The former is a slight upgrade worth a few bucks. The user can elect to overclock the card, if desired. The latter (DP feature) is much more important because Nvidia (and other mfrs) are now using a feature called VSynch in conjunction with certain Gfx cards, and certain modern monitors which will accept the feature. Modern monitors typically have available Display Port inputs, so give this some thought, especially if a monitor upgrade is in the future. Neither HDMI nor DVI will allow VSynch. Only Display Port allows this feature.

Ideally, one would have a Gfx card that was VSynch-capable, a proper Display Port connector (not all are created equal, be advised), and a monitor that was VSynch-capable. To sum, getting an "OC" version of the 1650 low-profile card, as well as a low profile metal bracket, AND a card that has a Display Port vid output is a home run.

This most likely concludes my investigation of half-height, low-profile Gfx cards suitable for PSUs that are in the 240W range. I believe my testing results, especially when using the MSI Kombustor program, are reasonably valid for the cards tested. Whether or not my results will work for you, and your rig, is a question of your rig's capabilities.

submitted for discussion

Last edited by RIBob; 12/10/19 10:22 PM.
#4499880 - 12/10/19 10:07 PM Re: Why I Am Insistent On Upgrading One's Computer [Re: RIBob]  
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A fair question to ask, at this point, is whether one should bother to do all these various upgrades to one's computer.

The fundamental problem is that a lot of people have older computers whose OpSys is dedicated to THAT computer, and who have loads of stuff (games) on their Win XX Opsys that is likewise dedicated to a particular, specific, computer. If one migrates to another computer, even with the identical OpSys, such programs will probably need to be re-installed into the new computer. HUGE hassle, even for folks who have saved/documented all the patches/links needed to do so. From my experience, many of those older web sites are extinct.

So, the interest in upgrading existing computers. Most components of computers are capable of being replaced, even by the user. IDK if a MoBo (and consequent CPU upgrade) replacement will "Trigger" a "new computer" issue. Suspect it will do so. but no expert. I doubt whether any other component replacement, including a CPU replacement will be immediately, and fundamentally, problematical..


The SFF people are usually very limited in terms of PSU wattage and physical space. Their computers require the less-common, niche Low-profile, half-height, low-wattage Gfx cards. As I have demonstrated, such upgrades are possible within the 240W OEM power supply envelope.

Those using physically larger computers have more options, generally. Such larger computers usually allow the installation of greater-capacity PSUs, and physically larger, more-demanding Gfx cards. Perhaps such computers will allow the upgrading of one's CPU. Be advised that some computer Mother Boards have soldered-in, non-replaceable CPUs. This permanent CPU feature is a severe limit, IMHO, if one wants to play modern games. One is severely limited by a soldered-in, non-upgradeable CPU.

Point is that upgrading older computers only makes sense within certain parameters. It's a balancing act. Having a capable CPU, which processes all the data that one's Gfx card uses, is probably the first thing to consider. Next would be the available RAM. More is ALWAYS better, and it's relatively cheap. One's Gfx card is the last part of the triad, and ought to be balanced amongst one's CPU , RAM, and the wattage available with one's Power Supply, and that power required by the GFX card, and one's overall system.. One's Gfx card takes what is processed by the CPU, using available RAM, and then puts forth the final, visual product.

I have played EAW (and some other games of similar era) with gfx settings at max, using a very simple Dell OptiPlex Core 2 Duo CPU, GT 730 Gfx card, and 8 Gb of RAM. Everything worked very nicely.

OTOH, such a set-up is probably OK for EAW, but inadequate for more graphically advanced games. For example, important Gfx features in some games of similar vintage to EAW games were not accessible without more advanced Gfx cards, given the same overall system. The ancient Crimson Skies game being a surprise. Ever see, within any given game set-up, some graphics which features you were never able to access? Or turned-off features that you selected being turned-off upon re-visiting the same selection page? That's your game telling you something's missing. Assuming your CPU and RAM are fairly decent, it's probably your Gfx card holding you back. BTDT.

For example, using the aforementioned 730 card, certain, very useful features as are available on Crimson Skies are not accessible. Using a 1050 Ti card, such features, ostensibly available within the game options, ARE accessible. The features thus accessed are literally stunning in their visual impact. One will have to try it to see what one was missing.

So, the utility of intelligently upgrading one's computer is demonstrated. BTDT.


My fairly modern gaming computer sees none of these restrictions, even for modern games like IL-2 and its more advanced variants. I paid a reasonable price for that capability, and have never regretted it.

I still retain my older (upgraded) computers since they have programs that are not easily replicated. I hand-down the Gfx cards, within my computer group, and give the unused cards to my computer guy for distribution as charity--and future good will.

ETA: I have just ordered a Low-profile, half-height GT 1650 Gfx card by Zotac. The reasons for doing so are: 1) It is the best, fastest card obtainable at writing, for low-power, SFF computers, and 2) It has, unlike some similar cards, native provision for Display Port output from the card. The Display Port feature is useful because most Gfx card mfrs have features, such as Nvidia's Vsynch, which can only be employed when the card is connected to one's monitor via Display Port. Most Gfx card mfrs will state which monitors will allow access such features. IRRC, the Nvidia name for this feature is Vsynch, and I believe competing card mfrs have similar features.

In sum: The new buy is a Gfx card capable of Vsynch, with native DP output, DP connection between card and monitor, and a monitor with native DP input, and which has been certified by one's Gfx card mfr to be appropriate to such Vsynch. The Gfx card mfrs are constantly updating the models of monitor which are deemed capable of using this feature, so consult the appropriate Gfx card mfr's site for updates on such.

Since Half-height, low profile (LP) cards are a niche item, I don't expect any great number of additions to what is currently available, beyond the GT 1650. But who knows? Whether or not such future cards will be suitable for low-power PSUs is another question; I suspect not, but again, who knows?

Submitted for consideration.



Last edited by RIBob; 12/14/19 09:05 PM.
#4501685 - 12/26/19 11:55 PM Re: Why I Am Insistent On Upgrading One's Computer [Re: RIBob]  
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On further investigation, replacing the Nvidia GT 730 card in my Dell 760 SFF computer with an Nvidia GT 1030 card allowed the formerly unavailable graphics features on Crimson Skies (seen on other computers) to become available. Some of the relevant selections were initially de-selected/turned-off by the game/computer, but when I selected them, and played the game, the selected items remained activated.

For those interested, I have tried to insert a Nvidia GTX 1050 Ti card into this computer. It is perhaps a 20-25% upgrade over the 1030 card. While nowhere the top of the heap, it is a reasonably decent card, and the retail price shows it. Such a card might be of use to some players--YMMV. Unfortunately, the card did not physically fit. However, a solution might be at hand, namely a "PCEI extender cable" which cable links the existing PCIE slot to a flexible cable which connects to one's graphics card. Such an arrangement will, I hope, allow installation of the Nvidia 1050 Ti card into the Dell 760, although some jiggering might be necessary.

The point to all this is to submit that, given an elderly computer with (Maxxed-out) 8GB RAM, an Intel Core 2 Duo CPU (not replaceable), and a modern SSD feeding the system, one can definitely access formerly unobtainable graphics features on some games..
I suggest that one take a close look at the gfx settings available in all one's games. Tinker with them to see how much one can elevate the settings before one runs into problems. With older games, the settings will likely be higher than with newer games. IOW, a modern computer will probably run a modern game, like IL-2, on reasonable settings. One's older computer will likely run out of capacity, in any number of areas, running modern games at anywhere near max
.
Unless you upgrade your older computer, intelligently.

Older games need less capabilities, but can still benefit from intelligent upgrading. Modern games will need the same upgrades. So why not upgrade your older computer, to get the most out of what you have, and play some modern games, perhaps at less diminished levels that you might formerly have thought?

And in any event, BACK-UP your Drive's content.

Last edited by RIBob; 12/27/19 12:00 AM.
#4501838 - 12/29/19 01:30 AM Re: Why I Am Insistent On Upgrading One's Computer [Re: RIBob]  
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 401
RIBob Offline
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RIBob  Offline
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Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 401
Posted elsewhere, but this tidbit might be of some use:

"Just got home, and ran ‘Windows Experience’ feature on Win 7 computer. Formerly had Nvidia GT 730 Gfx card installed, and new card is Nvidia 1030. Score on Gfx features went up from 7.0/8.0 to 7.8/8.0.

Seems demonstrated that “Windows Experience has little “headroom” for Gfx cards beyond a certain point. No surprise that your new 1050 Ti Gfx card had little impact vice your former 1050 card, with respect to “Windows Experience"—you were already maxxed-out as far as that feature is concerned. The feature only has a certain amount of "headroom", so to speak, and is incapable of anything else beyond original settings. FWIW, the feature is discontinued on Wim 10. The important thing is that the card is of benefit to you. Even installation of a modern SSD only bumped that particular aspect of the “Experience” to 7.8/8.0."

Whether or not "Windows Experience" can "see" a benefit to a Gfx card, beyond a certain point, is entirely independent to whether YOU will see a difference. I suspect that your games, and your visual experience, will benefit from upgrading to Gfx cards above the 1030 level, which "Windows Experience" has apparently set as the max allowable.

With a little luck, and a PCIE extension cable, I'll e installing an Nvidia 1050 Ti card into this wimpy little Dell 760 SFF computer. I doubt that "Windows Experience" will notice, but I am willing to bet an objective observer will be able to do so.

Submitted for consideration.

Last edited by RIBob; 12/29/19 01:40 AM.
#4502010 - 12/30/19 10:26 PM Re: Why I Am Insistent On Upgrading One's Computer [Re: RIBob]  
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 401
RIBob Offline
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RIBob  Offline
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Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 401
Unfortunately, the 1050 Ti card failed on installation into 2 different computers, although it ran, initially, on one of them, and more unfortunately, just beyond the 30-day warranty period offered by Newegg, the vendor. This is the second card bought from that specific vendor which has failed just out of warranty. Possibly a coincidence. YMMV.

I'll have it tested by my computer guy, just in case. In any event, back to the old reliable Nvidia 1030, at least for now. At least the 1030 card plays Crimson Skies in all its' glory, and unlocks the features not offered by the Nvidia 730 Gfx card. FWIW, even the Nvidia 1030 card FAR surpasses the Gfx requirements of most older sims, EAW specifically included.

This is unfortunate, but in my other computers I have Gfx cards that FAR, FAR exceed the deceased 1050 Ti card. Just lamenting on the $150 spent to no use. I'll get over it, lol.
Submitted for consideration.


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