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#4487437 - 08/25/19 11:18 AM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Wulfe, I feel your pain. I am still one of the few not flying a Pup!

Lou, it’s Mr. Cameron still. He is but a lowly Sub Flight Lieutenant. My apologies for not giving the proper heading. We should have a spanking! His last three confirmed victories, a double one day and single the next makes his total 5.


Never approach a bull from the front, a horse from the rear or a fool from either end.
BOC Member since....I can't remember!
#4487444 - 08/25/19 12:34 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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MFair, no need for apologies, I was the one who made the incorrect assumption on your ace's rank. And I've a hunch when Raine sees Mr. Cameron's latest tally there will be some bling coming his way.

.

25 August 1916
Fienvillers, France

Captain Swanson led 'A' Flight on a contact patrol along the lines from Vimy down to Guillemont and back. His headache, while present, was becoming quite manageable. The current regimen of ginger tea, peppermint oil, exercise, and abstinence from strong drink seemed to be working, and he was most glad for it. On the return leg of the morning sortie Swany spotted a lone Aviatik over the little village of Ablainzeville and crept up behind it unseen. He sent one long burst from his Vickers and watched as the gunner suddenly slumped down in his office, and a moment later the plane went into a steep dive trailing a wisp of white smoke. It never recovered and slammed into the earth below. Swany's G/O, Lt. Christopher Dent, who had swung his own gun around to bear, never even had a chance to fire and could only watch the brief encounter. By the time the flight had returned to camp confirmation of the victory had already been called in by two separate British gun crews north of Bellevue. It was tallied as number 25 for Swany, making him an ace five times over. A good morning's work.

70 Squadron's 'A' Flight rising up into a beautiful late-summer sky.
[Linked Image]

An unsuspecting enemy also out enjoying the morning air.
[Linked Image]

Two more Huns on their way to Valhalla.
[Linked Image]

Back in time for a mid-morning cup of ginger tea.
[Linked Image]

.

#4487455 - 08/25/19 01:35 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Nice Skin there Lou. I quite like it.

Aug 25. Jasta 1
Ltn Willi Rosenstein.

The last two days were some what frustrating for Willi. Try as he liked he could just not find anybody to test the new Albatros with.
Already the engine pull was well recieved by all who had a quick spin in the machine. She had at least 38+kmh over the Halby. Although most thought the bus a little nose heavy, Willi's time on the Roland compensated this minor detail.

But today was different. It was a magnificent summers day, with light clouds here and there, just the sort weather one wanted when going hunting. But the order of the say was to babysit a Roland for foto work near Agny. Unfortunatly for the Halbs it was a game
of catch up. Both the Roland and the DI shot off for the front. As they neared the front, Willi noticed three dots stand out against the silver/white clouds. 3x N16's.
Willi dove down to the Roland and waved him off, then turned to engage the three Franzmänner. And talk about timing, the rest of Jasta 1 arrived. Halb's started falling like hawks onto the N16's. This time Willi wanted to wait and see what happend.
As as expected, the Neup's rolled and turned, eventually getting the better of the old Halb's.
So down Willi went with his wingman to bail the boys out.
It was pure joy, the Alb was a beast !! The extra power and lift allowed Willi to stay on top and behind the enemy. Not once did Willi ever feel that his opponent was a danger.
And the two Spandau's made quick work of the aircraft that fell into his sights.

The first N16 dived for the lines, which saved him. Willi turned back to help the others. He latched onto the tail of a second enemy and sent him down.
Now Willi dived on the the third, and just in time too, as he was really thumping one if the Halbs. It was a good fight. The Franzman tried his best but the Alby was just too good.
He made a break for the lines, but the Alby caught up quickly, and it was over in seconds.
Three fights, with two very dead enemy.
This time Willi greated the crews at home with a great big smile on his oil soaked face.

Attached Files CFS3 2019-08-25 13-50-33-38.jpgCFS3 2019-08-25 14-42-39-37.jpgCFS3 2019-08-25 14-47-46-35.jpg
Last edited by lederhosen; 08/25/19 01:36 PM.

make mistakes and learn from them

I5 4440 3.1Ghz, Asrock B85m Pro3, Gtx 1060 3GB
#4487465 - 08/25/19 02:50 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Thanks Lederhosen, glad you like it. I see that Willi has a heart prominently displayed on his new mount, is that to show how much he loves it? A good first combat showing in it too, I've no doubt he will be racking up quite the score with the Alb. And to that point, how many victories does the Leutnant have confirmed at this point?

.


#4487469 - 08/25/19 03:35 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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MFair, looks like a busy week for your pilot. Congrats on the kill count, despite the rejections and what crawled up Cpt. Gally's behind?
Wulfe, you're caugt up to date. I guess I'm the only one left behind - getting difficult with these loooong flights. So N.17, but none for Fullard. Luck is not on his side, but he still manages to bring the Boche down. Hope this rotten luck doesn't stay much longer with him.
Lou, everything seems to be going well for Swany. Headache manageable, claims getting confirmed. Things are looking up. Congrats on number 25!
And Lederhosen, with machine like that there is no way Frenchies have any chance in hell. Fingers crossed the new claims get confirmed.

18 August, 1916 13:30 afternoon mission
Luxeuil, Alsace Sector
3 Wing RNAS
FSL Tobias Chester Mulberry
4 confirmed kills

Drops of rain were dribbling down the leading edge of Toby’s Strutter. He was about to take off on his own. All other machines were kept in reserve for the bombing mission to Mulhouse and the Captain decided to send Mulberry on a recon mission ahead of the main strike force. Toby didn’t mind especially that earlier today he heard the news his Fokker from the Colmar raid had been confirmed. Ray continued to call him ‘the Killer’ and that was bothering him. He’ll have to talk to him about it when he gets back. He gave the signal and the mechanics pulled the chocks away. It lurched forward and began to roll. Toby was soon in the air and gaining height. He looked around and settled in for a long flight. The engine sounded good and he was looking forward to getting above the rain clouds as quickly as possible. A burst of Archie exploded far ahead, then another. What’s going on? Training exercise? Toby strained his eyes to see better and each of his hairs stood immediately on its end. It was a raid! Fokkers were coming straight at him! One, two, three. Four! Four Eindeckers were barreling down straight at him. What to do? Turn back? Get close to the aerodrome and the safety of the artillery? He was too far away. They would be upon him before he could get there. Mulberry decided to fight. Maybe he’ll sill be able to land if he doesn’t get shot up too badly. He dove to pick up speed and get extra distance as the Huns flew above. They were on him instantly. Bullets slapped the fuselage and the wings. Alford was firing his Lewis madly. Two Fokkers chased after him, while the other two stayed high. A tan one and a green Eindecker were now circling with the Strutter close to the ground. The rear gunner seemed to focus his energy on the green one. Toby decided to keep the tan one in his sights, but as soon as he came anywhere close to the Strutter’s propeller, the Eindecker would dive away and the green one continued to stay on the tail despite Alford’s best efforts. The ant-aircraft batteries opened up on the intruders and Toby could see tracers fly nearby. “- Careful, down there!” He thought to himself as he brought his machine to bear. Finally they were too low for the Hun to dive away and Toby found his mark. The bits and pieces of the monoplane started to fly off as his Vickers hammered away. The Fokker’s engine started to smoke and one of the bullets caught the pilot in the back. The whole machine spun to the ground near the aerodrome. The green Fokker behind hit him one more time and Toby banked hard. They were almost over the airdrome now and the Strutter turned inside the Eindecker. The green monoplane was now in front. Toby’s Vickers barked again and another German pilot was falling helplessly to the ground. “- Not there! Not there!” To Toby’s horror the stricken Fokker was falling directly toward one of the hangars. It smashed into it with a sickening crunch, setting the structure on fire. He could see people running. A few were dragging their mates from the crash site. Toby was sick to his stomach - it was his fault. He looked around. The skies seemed to be clear and there were no more Archie explosions anywhere near. He’d decided to land his damaged machine. There was no way he would complete his reconnaissance mission now. Mulberry pointed his machine towards the aerodrome and settled into a landing pattern, but something didn’t seem right. Toby looked up to his starboard. There! The two remaining Fokkers were coming down on him out of who knows what concealment. Mulberry winced. He can’t do this again with a damaged machine. An E.IV zoomed by. Toby’s Strutter banked to follow. He could see the second Fokker in the corner of his eye. Alford will have to deal with that one. The Strutter continued to follow the German monoplane hoping for a lucky snapshot. Toby fired and the shot connected with the other plane right at the instant when he crossed in front of the British pilot. The Fokker dove to evade any more fire and turned east. Toby dove after but the E.IV was faster. Mulberry fired at the receding silhouette, but it was a vain attempt. He abandoned the pursuit and concentrated on the final Fokker behind. A simple bank and a 360 degree turn brought the Fokker in front of the Strutter. The last Eindecker attempted to dive in order to escape, but Toby had him back in his sights soon after. He fired two more bursts and then his gun fell silent. For the first time he depleted all of his ammunition. It was now up to Alford. Mulberry brought his bus close to the Fokker to give his gunner the opportunity to bring the Hun down. That’s when he realized how poor of a shot his gunner was. The man couldn’t hit the helpless monoplane despite plenty of opportunity. It was also then that Toby realized the German must have had a gun jam and wasn’t able to retaliate. Mulberry continued to bring his plane alongside the enemy’s to give his gunner a chance to shoot it down. It was after the fourth or fifth attempt that Alford got a break and a single solitary bullet hit the Fokker, which immediately went into a spin and crashed below. The Strutter didn’t linger around. Toby brought his plane quickly back to the aerodrome and landed. The mechanics, who witnesses the entire ordeal came close to take a look at the machine that took on four Fokkers and survived.

YouTube Link



"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4487474 - 08/25/19 03:59 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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That was a scrap and a half!... well done old chap!

#4487475 - 08/25/19 04:10 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Thanks Trooper. I nearly pooped my pants when I saw all four of them coming at me.


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4487479 - 08/25/19 05:37 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Well Done, Fullof It

Leaderhosen: Great looking machines.

RAF Louvert: Good entertaining story.

Last edited by carrick58; 08/25/19 05:50 PM.
#4487482 - 08/25/19 05:48 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Keith Cunard Mallory
2nd LT, Rfc
29 Sqn, Ablee AF.
DH-2's
4 Kills
Aug 25, 1916

Mission One: No go, I had a power loss so put back to the Aerodrome.

Mission Two: Line Patrol near Loos. Mixed it up with 3 e/a One a 2 wing lite in color, It was the one that smoked O Reilly saw him go down,but couldn't help. Covered my # 2 as he got a monoplane Then it was over. Score 1 to 1. Not really good since we attacked with 6 a/c.

Attached Files CFS3 2019-08-25 10-23-09-78.jpgCFS3 2019-08-25 10-26-24-06.jpg
#4487502 - 08/25/19 09:58 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: carrick58]  
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Originally Posted by carrick58
Well Done, Fullof It.

Carrick, this was supposed to be a quiet sector.
You on the other hand have your hands full of Halberstads, Fokkers and now Albatrosen. Good luck!


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4487542 - 08/26/19 01:01 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Fullofit, that was some flying Sir! A nail biter for sure!

Lt. James Cameron
6 victories
Aug. 25, 1916

James was on top of the world. His two seater from the day before was confirmed. He had been promoted to Lieutenant and was flying a brand new Strutter with a very experienced gunner. Approaching the lines for an Arty spotting mission cover flight of Pups dove on 4 monoplanes that we’re trying to disrupt the party. For a moment, James wished he was in his Nieuport so he could join in. James and Keeble, flying the other Strutter continued on the spotting mission. One monoplane climbed up to them but James and his gunner made him think otherwise and he headed east. They started their spotting mission and James could see the fight breaking up to the west. Then 2 more monoplanes flashed below them. James circled waiting for the right time and dove on the trailing Fokker. He pulled in behind it and started firing. Pieces were coming off the Fokker and it sat up on its tail. James tried to avoid the collision but heard and felt a sickening crunch. He was still airborne and had control. He turned the machine west and at the same time bullets smacked into the Strutter. He put the stick down and dove. More bullets hit the machine and he felt a hammer blow to his shoulder. He skidded right and left but this Hun was intent on revenge for his friend they had just knocked out of the air. The mud was coming up fast and James pulled the Strutter level with bullets still hitting the Strutter and both occupants. The came to rest just in front of the trenches and passed out.

The infantry pulled James and his observer from the wreckage. A medic examined James and shook his head. His observer died a short time later.

Ok Gents. I was just getting my footing with James. This pisses my off. You all keep up the good fight, I’ll be back.


Never approach a bull from the front, a horse from the rear or a fool from either end.
BOC Member since....I can't remember!
#4487544 - 08/26/19 01:44 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Oh no MFair, say it ain't so! What a gut punch. I hope you won't be out too long Sir.

Fullofit, wowzers, that was some kind of encounter. 4-to-1 odds and Chesty beat 'em all. Outstanding video and write-up.

Carrick, Keith and his mates at 29 Squadron are taking a bit of a thumping from the looks of it. Hope that changes for them soon.

.

26 August 1916
Fienvillers, France

It was shortly after eight in the morning and rain was pelting against the windows of the Officers' Mess at 70 Squadron. A storm front had pushed in from the Atlantic overnight and with it came not only the rain but dense clouds and fog. It was primarily the last of these that was now being waited out before attempting to fly the morning patrols. Captain Swanson was sipping at a fresh cup of ginger tea which had just been brought him. Earlier in the week Swany had provided the mess with a tin of powdered ginger and discussed with the head steward how it should be prepared, and the fellow assured him he would have the beverage ready for him whenever he might request it. As thanks Swany had slipped the good man several packs of Murads.

"What's the word Captain Peppermint, is this bloody fog lifting soon or not?" It was Lt. William Kennedy-Cochran-Patrick making the inquiry of his fellow pilot and friend, (as a result of his latest medicinal routine "Captain Peppermint" was now one of Swanson's new nicknames, along with "Gingerbreath Man").

"Ya well who can tell, Patty", Swany replied with a wide grin.

"How's the head feeling, you look like you're back in fine fettle to me", the Lieutenant noted as he sat down at the other side of table.

"Better and better every day. Just a dull pain on da right side most of da time now."

"Well that is marvelous isn't it", Patty acknowledge in a jovial tone, then continued. "Say, that was quite the show yesterday afternoon. We gave those bloody Huns what for, eh?"

The show the Lieutenant was referring to began shortly after lunch the previous day when a pair of Rolands had come over and bombed the field at Fienvillers. Every crew that could get in the air was ordered up immediately to give chase, and as it happened Swany and his G/O, Christopher Dent, were already suited up as they had been preparing to make a quick circuit to check the rigging and trim that had just been completed on their mount. The pair bounded into the sky as quickly as the Strutter could climb and as they made the turn along the row of Bessonneaus the Hun bombs fell. Several hit the field next to the end hangar and heaved up clouds of dirt and sod. Hot shrapnel also tore through the nearby structure and set it alight.

No sooner had the dust began to settle on the ground than the Rolands came screaming down on the few Strutters that had managed to get into the air during the chaos. Captain Swanson watched in amazement and wondered what had possessed them to make such a bold move against superior numbers, and so far from their own lines. Whatever the reason, one of the Rolands was now descending menacingly upon them. Swany raised the nose of the Strutter in an effort to bring his forward gun to bear and as he did so the Hun pilot banked his own craft to open up a shot for his gunner as the two planes merged. In the gun pass that followed the enemy G/O missed the mark while Chris found his with remarkable accuracy. The Hun suddenly carved away and tried to run, but Swanson dove on him and closed the gap. As he approached he could see the Boche G/O was pounding on his gun with his gloved fist, something was jammed up tight. Swany took full advantage of the situation and began firing long bursts into his target as it grew ever closer. He watched as the man in his sights tried in vain to free up his own weapon, but to no avail. Just before breaking off the Captain unleashed one final burst that laced the entire side of the Roland. Seconds later fire began rolling out from the engine of the crippled craft and it plummeted to its fiery end. As Swany swung the Strutter around he spotted two other teams chasing after the remaining enemy plane, which they dispatched in fairly short order.

But the excitement wasn't quite over for Swany and Chris as the Clerget in their mount suddenly spluttered, coughed, and went silent. Dammit, no fuel! Apparently the enemy gunner had managed to land at least one bullet on the mark. Fortunately the field was close and Captain Swanson had enough altitude to glide down safely and make a fine dead stick landing, passing near the handiwork done by the Boche bombs. Luck had clearly favored 70 Squadron, it could have been a lot worse. It certainly had been for the Hun.


Rising up to meet the threat.
[Linked Image]


A row of newly-formed craters and a smoking hangar, courtesy of the Hun.
[Linked Image]


The enemy diving fast and hell-bent on further destruction.
[Linked Image]


A sudden change of heart and a futile run for more friendly skies.
[Linked Image]


A jam for the Boche gunner - fatally bad luck.
[Linked Image]


Poor sod, he and his pilot don't stand a chance at this point.
[Linked Image]


A horrid end for any airman, friend or foe.
[Linked Image]


The second Roland being finished off by two other crews from 70 Squadron.
[Linked Image]


Gliding home victorious, passing the new landscaping along the way.
[Linked Image]

.

#4487593 - 08/26/19 09:05 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Thanks Lou. That is not the first mid air that has taken out one of my pilots! The next lad will be a Hun.


Never approach a bull from the front, a horse from the rear or a fool from either end.
BOC Member since....I can't remember!
#4487594 - 08/26/19 09:06 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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Great stories all!

#4487599 - 08/26/19 09:44 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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MFair, d’oh! Sorry to hear about James. Has it been two weeks? At least it was authentic. What a waste of young life. So, a Hun is getting ready to do battle, eh? I suggest the Alsace sector. They say it’s pretty quiet. wink
Lou, congrats on that Walfisch! A Strutter and a Roland, that sounds like even odds. Now explain to me how odds can be even. Great story and photos to go with it. “Gingerbreath Man” - a classic! You need to introduce yourself to a muffin that lives on Drury Lane when you’re back in Blighty.

19 August, 1916 06:50 morning mission
Luxeuil, Alsace Sector
3 Wing RNAS
FL Tobias Chester Mulberry
6 confirmed kills

There was a small gathering in front of the hangars. All the pilots lined up in a row and Captain Elder called Tobias Chester Mulberry out to come up and be congratulated for the actions of 18 August when he singlehandedly destroyed 2 enemy machines. The first Fokker from yesterday’s aerodrome attack was contested by the artillery. Archie boys didn’t want to claim the green one that had crashed into the hangar, it went to Toby. And the last one was credited to Mulberry and Alford as well. ‘Daddy’ shook Mulberry’s hand and handed him the gold lace to go on his jacket cuffs. Toby was now promoted to the rank of Flight Lieutenant. Ray, standing near the end of the ranks turned to Whealy standing beside him: “- I bet our killer Ace is going to get a medal as well.” Art rolled his eyes.

Flight Lieutenant Mulberry was leading for the first time. They were to drop their eggs on the heads of the German troops in the trenches north of Lunéville and return. It sounded simple enough. The weather was beautiful and not a single Hun in sight. Mulberry and Sharman flew over the trenches without spotting them. They had to go around for another run. That’s when Toby noticed movement below. There was an air battle going on just above the trenches. He dropped his bombs and looked around, but Sharman was nowhere to be found. Instead, an Eindecker took up a position behind. Toby wasn’t about to just wait for the Hun to shoot him down. He turned his plane around and faced his foe. They were going head to head and the Hun blinked first. He fired his Spandau, missing completely. Toby took a careful aim, fired and missed completely. He noticed this Fokker had red and white bands around the fuselage.
They each banked and were about to start the circle of death, but the pilot of the Eindecker had made a mistake and just for a fraction of a second he flew in front of Toby’s gun. Mulberry was ready and fired. Maybe one of the bullets hit the canvas, maybe something more critical. The Fokker went into an all too familiar fake spin, but Toby wasn’t about to follow. He just observed. The German pilot continued to spin, spin, spin. And then smashed into the ground. Toby was flabbergasted. He was sure the damage was not that great. It had to be a control cable. Mulberry had his plane already pointing in the right direction and heading for home.

YouTube Link



"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4487621 - 08/27/19 03:40 AM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
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MFair, I'm fairly shattered seeing your man go so quickly. Personally, I find I take too many chances when flying with the RNAS and all their good kit.

Fullofit, Chesty is making a good breast of things down in the Alsace. Congratulations.

Lederhosen, how many confirmed now?

Carrick, when will Keith bag the elusive No 5? Keep him alive until the RFC gets a better machine.

Harry, perhaps Lazlo will need a more suitably built machine. Fancy a Gotha sometime soon?

Lou, Swaney's headache isn't putting him off his game. Try my father's natural cure for anything: bottle of scotch and a lemon. Go to bed with scotch. Place lemon at foot of bed. When you see two lemons, you're cured!



An Airman’s Odyssey – by Lt James Arthur Collins, MC

Part Fifty-Five: In which I defend the Realm!


It was a pleasant drive out to North Weald Bassett. I found the place without too much bother. Or at least I found the village. Twice I drove along the Epping Road past the lane into the aerodrome without noting the wooden guard house at the corner or the RFC ensign hanging limp on its low pole.

Major Higgins was present and sent for me as soon as I reported. After issuing a compulsory dressing-down for not reporting the previous evening, he informed me that I was to act as flight commander for “A” flight, as I outranked Billy Leefe Robinson and Fred Sowry. He reminded me that Billy and Fred had more experience in night flying than I, and suggested I remedy that shortcoming. And then he left me alone to survey my kingdom.

The laneway that angled off the Epping Road was lined on the west side with storerooms, work sheds, and technical offices, and the two barrack huts each segmented into two-man rooms for the six officers assigned to the flight. On the left side of the road stood the armourers’ sheds, butts, and the aeroplane sheds. The other ranks were still under canvas, although a row of barrack buildings was nearing completion by the airfield. There was no officers’ mess. We were to take our meals at q nearby pub, the Kings Head.

This being my first command of any real sort, I retired to the small building across from the guard house that served as the station office. I gave orders for the pilots to meet me in the Kings Head when it reopened at 4 pm. The meeting was informal, just the eight of us: Leefe Robinson, Sowrey, Ness, Redden, McHarg, Edmund, Skeffington, and me. Beer was ordered. We went around the room, putting forward suggestions about how to find and hunt hostile airships. Here at least I had the advantage. Only Leefe Robinson and I had so far seen a Zeppelin in the air.

The general plan was simple. A patrol section of three or four machines would take off together and gently fan out before turning east or south, according to orders. No turn would be begun until two minutes after takeoff. The leader would begin climbing to 14000 feet immediately and would turn first. The second man would hold at 1000 feet for one minute before turning and climbing to 12000 feet. The third would hold at 1000 feet for two minutes and then turn and climb to 10000 feet. The fourth, if any, would hold three minutes, turn, and climb to 8000 feet. Orders would specify the patrol circuit.

Everyone was very keen and determined to bag a Zeppelin. And everyone wanted permission for family to visit. I put Billy in charge of inviting as many young ladies as possible to a dance in two weeks’ time. Freddie had the more difficult job of putting together a band!

The next week was wonderful. Cross country flights by day and an intense regimen on night flying after dark, following Major Higgins’s own plan for training. The field was large, with a line of trees the only obstacle on the south side and the village close by on the north. The surrounding fields, however, were rather small if something went wrong. I grew familiar with the approaches, clawing over the elms and stalling close by the first in a row of fire-pots, and then quickly turning to taxi out of harm’s way and back to the sheds.

We familiarized on new weapons. We had several sorts of incendiary rounds, including a new type made by Sparklet – the soda siphon company. I thought of Major Harvey-Kelly and the siphon battles in 3 Squadron’s messes. There was also a Heath Robinson affair – a battery of French-made rockets wired to the outer struts. At the flick of a toggle switch they would fire madly off in all directions and, we were assured, Zeppelins would fall from the skies. They were rubbish, of course, but great fun to play with.

Then came the night of 23 August. I’d returned from the Kings Head shortly before midnight and had just laid out my pyjamas when the bell outside the station office began to clang. I ran down the gravelled road to investigate. The duty sergeant stumbled over his words: “Zep, Zep, Zeppelins. Number and height unknown. Passed over Southend minutes ago, heading west. One section patrol Romford to Dartford. Hold the other. Go! Go!”

At the sheds the boys were dressing. “Ness – number two. Billy – number three.” I didn’t see Sowrey. It would be the three of us then. Romford to Dartford. Multiple airships. Height unknown.”

The engine was being run up and I climbed into the BE12. Temperature was close enough. I waved away the chocks and turned up the field, rumbling and thumping over the clay until the tail came up and I climbed into a moonless night. After a minute I turned around to the south and began climbing hard. A cloud layer at 5000. Scattered clouds beyond. Fifteen minutes later I was passing through 8000 feet, climbing at full throttle. Panel lights off now. Look for the river. #%&*$#, nothing but cloud.

There it is! Off to the left. A small ship’s wake stood out against the blackness. I counted the minutes to Dartford. At 10000 feet I turned about and headed northwest, still climbing but not as hard now. The BE was struggling to keep up the rate of ascent. Mustn’t stall.

A flash to my right. Thin daggers of bluish white light scraped across the sky. Searchlights over Grays. Other lights joined the dance, reaching out to the night, some diffused by the lower cloud bank, some knife-edged and piercing. I turned east. They must have heard the Huns’ engines. 12000 feet now. I wondered where Ness and Billy were. Billy had a Bristol. That’s why he was number three.

To my left, something twinkled. I remembered a night in Saskatchewan. What was I? Seven? Eight? My father home from the Yukon. Dorothy and a friend with jars, and a field of fireflies on a hot summer night. This was like one of those fireflies, except it didn’t belong here at 13000 feet. I searched for it. There is was again – a silver flash in the beam of a searchlight. A second light beam joined the first, and now the flash took shape, long and silver. God bless the searchlight teams! This was a genuine Hunnish Zeppelin, just a mile off and a little higher. I turned gently, not daring to take my eyes off the things. It took form. There were ribs and seams and engine pods and a great black Maltese cross standing out against the silver.

[Linked Image]
"There is was again – a silver flash in the beam of a searchlight."

[Linked Image]
"There were ribs and seams and engine pods and a great black Maltese cross standing out against the silver."

The BE still needed 500 feet and threatened to stall. It was all done by feel now. One did not dare turn on the panel light. More searchlight beams converged on the airship. It grew larger and larger. I began to fire long bursts. God bless the Vickers! Sparks flew where the rounds struck the Hun. From his frozen lonely platform forward of the tail, a lone gunner opened fire and several rounds splattered through the wings of my machine. One struck the cowling and hit a strut. I kept firing – 300 rounds at least without effect. The silver giant went dark for an instant. I braced for a collision and in that second remembered the French rockets. I pulled at the toggle switch and rolled away simultaneously, momentarily blinded by the flare of the ten Le Prieur rockets.

It might have been the roll, for I was no longer aiming when I fired the things. But suddenly the world turned red and I felt the sear of the fireball on my left cheek.fireball on my left cheek.

[Linked Image]
"But suddenly the world turned red and I felt the sear of the fireball on my left cheek.fireball on my left cheek."

The BE12 tumbled away. Beside me the mighty airship was reduced to a metal skeleton in moments, a dragon breathing its last over the city below.

[Linked Image]
"Beside me the mighty airship was reduced to a metal skeleton in moments, a dragon breathing its last over the city below."

The engine didn’t sound exactly right and the nearest field was miles away. I turned from the probing lights and the tumbling flame and headed carefully north-northwest for home. Shivering unceasingly in the dark cockpit, I pieced it all together slowly. This was new. This was a first. We had finally brought down a Zeppelin over England. I had brought it down.



Attached Files Zep in the lights.pngZep in the lights 2.pngInferno.pngSilhouette.png
#4487632 - 08/27/19 10:26 AM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 3,477
RAF_Louvert Offline
BOC President; Pilot Extraordinaire; Humble Man
RAF_Louvert  Offline
BOC President; Pilot Extraordinaire; Humble Man
Senior Member

Joined: May 2012
Posts: 3,477
L'Etoile du Nord
.

Raine, ripping good stuff there! Those night missions are some of the best flying in WOFF in my humble opinion. Collins has made a name for himself now, bagging a Zep over home turf. Leefe Robinson will be so jealous.

Fullofit, congrats to Chesty's new rank, a well-deserved promotion. A magic bullet on that Fokker kill, or perhaps an unseen gunner was firing from the grassy knoll below.

MFair, a Hun next time, you say. I look forward to reading about his exploits.

.

#4487634 - 08/27/19 10:32 AM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 1,234
lederhosen Offline
Member
lederhosen  Offline
Member

Joined: May 2012
Posts: 1,234
Germany
I have still not seen such a monster.


Pilots end of month blog
ps. Lou if you have a list of gongs he recieved let me know pls.

Attached Files 1.jpg
Last edited by lederhosen; 08/27/19 01:36 PM.

make mistakes and learn from them

I5 4440 3.1Ghz, Asrock B85m Pro3, Gtx 1060 3GB
#4487647 - 08/27/19 12:14 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 3,477
RAF_Louvert Offline
BOC President; Pilot Extraordinaire; Humble Man
RAF_Louvert  Offline
BOC President; Pilot Extraordinaire; Humble Man
Senior Member

Joined: May 2012
Posts: 3,477
L'Etoile du Nord
.

Lederhosen, at this point the Gong Fairy has presented Willi with the EK2, EK1, and the HOH. I predict more bling for him in the very near future. smile2

.

#4487650 - 08/27/19 12:24 PM Re: Deep Immersion DiD campaign -- Player Instructions (UPDATED 28 Nov 2018) [Re: Raine]  
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 3,477
RAF_Louvert Offline
BOC President; Pilot Extraordinaire; Humble Man
RAF_Louvert  Offline
BOC President; Pilot Extraordinaire; Humble Man
Senior Member

Joined: May 2012
Posts: 3,477
L'Etoile du Nord
.

27 August 1916
Fienvillers, France

Captain Swanson was awakened from his sleep by a sound emanating from somewhere in his room. He sat up and looked about. A low, almost imperceptible creaking was coming from the darkened corner between the two tall windows. He strained his eyes trying to see beyond the moonlight that was streaming in through the westward facing fenêtre, which illuminated the large, overstuffed chair parked in front of it. From where his bed sat in the opposite corner of the apartment the chair, along with the eerie lunar glow, was preventing a full view of the murky corner. A midnight breeze was pushing the drapes of the north-facing window silently into the room, further hiding the space from which the noise came. Swany rubbed his eyes as he swung his legs out from under the blanket and stood up, continuing to look into the inky blackness between the open sashes. He was sure something was there, hiding. "Odd", he thought to himself about the moonlight, it had been raining the entire day before and there had been no prediction of it abating any time soon. Also odd was the fact that neither his head nor his leg was hurting a bit.

The creaking continued. It sounded almost as if someone where shifting about on a loose floorboard. A chill went up the young ace's spine as he took a step forward, fists clenched, eyes focused on the blackness. That's when he saw it - a figure. It moved, slowly, slowly, from out of the abyss - silent, save for the creaking. The specter inched past the breeze-swept drapes as they curled and slipped and slithered around it. After what seemed like an eternity the thing stepped full into the moonlight and stopped next to the chair. It was the Hun gunner from the Roland that Swany had sent down in flames two days ago. The man stood there, his flying kit charred and blackened, his face pallid and withered. And from behind the fractured glass of his flying goggles his eyes stared out, directly at Swany. Sad, inculpate, unblinking, dead eyes. He opened his mouth, as if to speak, but no words came out. Instead, inside, beyond the dust-dry, cracked lips and broken, ragged teeth, burned a fiery, hellish glow.

Captain Swanson sat bolt upright in his bed, his head throbbing as he did so. As he rubbed above his right ear with the palm of his hand he noticed the rain was still falling, just as it had done the entire day before. It pattered against the windows that flanked the far corner of the darkened room. Swany stared intently into that corner, seeing nothing but the small table and lamp that always stood there. After a while he lay back down and closed his eyes. "Poor sod", he whispered to himself. "He never stood a chance."

.

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