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#4418324 - 04/29/18 04:05 PM The Passing of The Greatest Generation.  
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I hope others will add to this thread.

From "The Greatest Generations Foundation" Facebook page:

AMERICA GREATEST HEROES: The last surviving member of the Maryland Chapter of the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association passed away this week.

Clarence Davis, a resident of Charlotte Hall for 33 years, died on Sunday, April 22, at Spring Village of Wildewood Assisted Living at the age of 94.

Davis had been suffering from Alzheimer’s for the last five or so years, his son, Mike Davis of Leonardtown, said.

The United States was attacked at Pearl Harbor by the Japanese on Dec. 7, 1941, which marked the American start of World War II, as more than 2,400 servicemen and civilians were killed.

By 2009, Clarence Davis was the last survivor of Pearl Harbor living in St. Mary’s County. There were only 12 Pearl Harbor survivors in all of Maryland in 2011, he said then.

Davis’ service ‘bookended’ the war

Growing up in Texas, Clarence Davis joined the Navy at the age of 17 on Jan. 24, 1941, months before the Pearl Harbor bombing.

He was ordered to the USS Oglala, a mine-sweeping ship, but when he arrived at Pearl Harbor, the order was changed to the repair ship USS Medusa. Between the two vessels, “I didn’t know the difference,” Clarence Davis said in a 2009 interview.

But the Oglala was one of 18 ships to sink to the bottom of Pearl Harbor.

Clarence Davis was working in the Medusa’s kitchen on the third deck down that Sunday morning.

“All of a sudden, we saw this huge ball of fire go up,” across the water at Ford Island in the center of Pearl Harbor, he said. The USS Utah, which was tied at the spot where the Medusa usually was, had just been hit. Fifty-eight of the Utah’s crew were killed.

“That’s twice — didn’t go to the Oglala and didn’t go over to where the Utah was,” Davis said as he recalled his streak of luck at Pearl Harbor.

From his vantage point aboard the USS Medusa, “when I saw that first bomb, we didn’t know what it was.”

Of its three guns, the Medusa had two anti-aircraft guns, which the crew manned to repel fire. A Japanese plane shot up the Medusa, but the ship’s men shot down two enemy planes in return.

Next to the Medusa in the harbor was the USS Curtis, which was hit by both a bomb and a Japanese plane that crashed into it. The Curtis sank, killing 21.

Clarence Davis remained at Pearl Harbor until April 1943 repairing ships. Aboard the USS Garrard, Davis was there at Tokyo Bay on Sept. 2, 1945, when the Japanese formally surrendered.

“He was aboard one of the many ships anchored in Tokyo Bay when the peace treaty was signed, thus making him one of only a handful of Navy personnel to ‘bookend’ the war,” his obituary said.

Mike Davis said it took a long time for his father to start talking about his experience at Pearl Harbor. His father didn’t join the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association until the 1980s, but once he did, “it gave him a great deal of focus.”

The attack on Pearl Harbor “had an enormous effect because of his age. He was so young when it happened, probably less so than a soldier in a foxhole. He was in a ship, a repair ship nonetheless,” Mike Davis said.

On behalf of TGGF and its members, we salute Mr. Davis for his dedication and service to our freedom.

Attached Files Clarence Davis.jpg
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#4418326 - 04/29/18 04:07 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA’S GREATEST HEROES: It’s with great sadness we share the news that TGGF member Mr. Darrell Blizzard: A Reluctant Hero of World War II has died. He was 96.

In 1927, when Darrell was five, his hero was Charles Lindbergh. The Christmas gift of a leather helmet and goggles cemented his dream. The circle of life and the power of faith can take you from the Allegheny’s of Pennsylvania to the beaches of Normandy. But with that faith he needed an olive branch. His olive branch came in the form of his superiors who were officers in the Army Air Corps, who gave him the best advice to change his course in life to become a pilot like his hero, Charles Lindbergh. These officers were his adopted brothers who didn’t snub their noses at him or dismiss him. They provided him with the foundation needed to fulfill his dream.

This dream would not come easy or without sacrifices. He had not completed college, he was drafted. He was not an officer, he was enlisted. His faith was not to be shaken. With the power of a mustard seed he dug deep and found his way into two excruciatingly pilot training courses and earned his wings. He stayed the course and accomplished what many said he wouldn’t and couldn’t. They chose him for a pilot’s job in the fledgling Army Air Corps. He listened and made it his. Lindbergh broke the barriers of distance and courage. Darrell’s adventures and journey started in the safety of his classrooms of Pennsylvania State University or Penn State. His head and heart was in the clouds he wanted to be his hero and fly.

He turned twenty-one on his voyage to England on the Queen Elizabeth, already the old man of the sea. From his humble beginnings, he acknowledged and recognized the dismissal of the black soldiers in the hold as he played craps with the white soldiers on deck. Finally, on Easter Sunday in 1945, Darrell Blizzard was able to join the fight for freedom over the skies of Europe. He wouldn’t be there long, just five missions but those experiences would last a lifetime for him. The terror of being the lone ship limping home after leaving in a wall of airplanes of more than five hundred.

Many times during World War II my Appalachian family ate potatoes as their only meal. Darrell met Prisoners of War who survived on loaves of bread made from sawdust and potatoes barely edible, black and rancid. He shared what he had with them and recognized the disparity of how American POW’s were treated as kings and the rest of the world as crap caught on the bottom of one’s shoe. In meeting these men, he realized that war, hate and anger would not be what they would write about in the history books. The truth of war would be left on the battlefields. But thankfully, Darrell Blizzard has survived nine plus decades to tell his story and I as a humble student can relay the truth to you and the world.

Not every family member would live to return to Normandy. Like many others, Darrell’s brother would be killed in a flight accident in Texas. His loss is just as real today as it was for me at the age of nine in 1969 when I first picked up my book to read about these great pilots of WWII. Like many veterans, Darrell came home a hero. No longer an orphan the world stood in awe to acknowledge his accomplishments and say thank you. Darrell and I both became commercial airline pilots. I didn’t see combat and I am grateful he chose to fight for my freedom and the freedom of every American. He faced many daunting mechanical and weather challenges that were easier than the dangers of flak and the Luftwaffe. He brought the same determination to his passengers and his career, like his determination to bring his B-17 crew back from every mission.

In 1945 they had not yet coined the term PTSD. Did he have to deal with the stress of combat upon his return? Yes, he did, he got busy with his goal to earn his degree. He didn’t isolate himself. He doesn’t have the answers to PTSD, but recognizes the challenges that each veteran faces who returns from war. He has missed his brother for the last forty plus years and continues to miss him at the age of ninety-two. His three main beliefs are God, family and country. Those beliefs have sustained him through the darkest and happiest days of his life. He is humbled that the world would give pause to recognize the heroes he left on the battlefield of Normandy to celebrate them. He is even more humbled to have lived long enough to celebrate his brothers as a true American hero.

The people of Cologne will always have a special place in his heart. He will never forget the land destroyed by bombs and the devastation created by hate. May God bless and keep all who served in the name of freedom and humanity for all. God bless Darrell Blizzard.

“Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Darrell Blizzard.jpg
#4418327 - 04/29/18 04:08 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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NATION REMEMBERS - TRIBUTES have been paid to Normandy "D-Day" veteran Mr. Vernon Jones, who has died aged 94.

Members of the Oxford branch of the Royal Green Jackets Association said they were ‘devastated’ by Mr Jones’ death.

Mr Jones was brought up in South Wales but moved to Abingdon with his family in 1931. He joined the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, based at Cowley Barracks, before joining 2nd Battalion, The Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Regiment, which took part in the Normandy landings.

Following D-Day Mr Jones fought across France, Belgium and Holland and into Germany but was injured in February 1945.

On behalf of TGGF and its members, we salute Mr. Jones for his dedication and service to our freedom.

“Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Vernon Jones.jpg
#4418342 - 04/29/18 05:48 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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My father was a Pearl Harbor survivor. He passed away in 1984


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#4418726 - 05/02/18 01:12 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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OUR GREATEST AMERICAN HEROES: It is with heartfelt sorrow we learn that World War II veteran Mr. James Avery has died. He was 96.

James Avery was born December 7, 1921 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He served his country in the U.S. Air Corps and was stationed at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas.

James Avery completed pilot training and commanded a B-26 bomber, surviving 44 missions over Germany.

After World War II, he attended the University of Illinois and received a B.F.A. in Industrial Design. He pursued college level teaching, and while at the University of Colorado, he explored jewelry-making techniques.

In the summer of 1954, James Avery started his jewelry business in a two-car garage with about $250 in capital. He built a small workbench, then bought a few hand tools and scraps of silver and copper. It was his desire to create jewelry that had meaning for him and his customers as well as having lasting value.

In 1957, he mailed his first Christian jewelry catalog. It was 16 pages and featured 39 items, all handmade. This was the year he also hired his first employee, Fred Garcia. "I had been doing everything myself - designing, sawing, polishing, finishing and selling. I thought 'what am I going to do? I can't saw that fast!"

The company was incorporated to James Avery Craftsman, Inc. in 1965, and two years later with the help of a modest loan from the SBA, the company headquarters was constructed on 20 acres in the heart of the Texas Hill Country in Kerrville, Texas, not too far from that original garage. In 1988 James Avery received a San Antonio Entrepreneur of the Year award.

Fifty-three years after he first founded the company, James Avery officially stepped down as CEO in May 2007 and passed the reins to his son Chris. He is still involved with the company and many days you can find him pursuing what he loves — creating new design ideas out of his office at the corporate headquarters in Kerrville.

Rest in eternal peace Warrior. Thank you for your service and many sacrifices. We as American citizens have a huge debt that we can never repay to our service members and veterans and your families who have put their lives on hold to serve our great nation, we may never know them all but we truely owe you all. God bless you Sir.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files James Avery.jpg
#4418786 - 05/02/18 12:32 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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I had heard of the jewelry line but I didn't know anything about the man who started the business. What a great biography!


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#4418837 - 05/02/18 05:34 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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OUR GREATEST HEROES: Its with great sadness we learn that one of the last remaining Burma World War II veteran Mr. John Skene has died. He was 99.

John Skene survived malaria, dengue fever and a close shave involving a 600lb shell exploding close to his head during his time in active service.

He served in France with the British Expeditionary Force, before being driven back across the channel by Hitler's forces.

After a short time serving on the Yorkshire coastal defences, with the Royal Welch Fusiliers, Mr Skene found himself sailing out to the war in the Far East - leaving behind his wife Muriel and two-week-old daughter.

The hardest fighting came in 1944, when Field Marshall Bill Slim's troops were taking Kohima back from the Japanese.

Mr Skene's luck finally ran out when a 600lb shell exploded close to his head - he survived, but received head injuries caused him to suffer regular headaches more than seven decades on.

While convalescing in a field hospital he contracted malaria and dengue fever, and was transferred to administrative duties.

Mr Skene was finally sent home in December 1945, and officially de-mobbed in February 1946 where he returned to civilian life.

Mr Skene was born in Kingswood in 1919. His father was an engineer and his mother worked in a shoe factory.

Aged just a few months old he moved to Cardiff with his family. Sadly his mother passed away when he was just five and due to his father being busy with work, he moved back to Kingswood where he was cared for by his grandparents.

He moved back with his father and his new family when he was 11 and left school at 14, where he worked in his dad's bicycle and radio shop with his brother Billie for pocket money.

In his later years he enjoyed holidaying in the Mediterranean, dancing, driving, day trips, listening to jazz, photography and charity work.

He spent a lot of his time at car boot sales and selling items through auctions to help raise money for a fishing for the disabled scheme set up by his wife.

He also travelled to India and Burma to visit the graves of his fallen war comrades where he presented a plaque in their memory in a local cathedral.

Rest in eternal peace Warrior. Thank you for your service and many sacrifices. We as American citizens have a huge debt to you and your brothers that we can never repay to our service members and veterans and your families who have put their lives on hold to serve our great nation, we may never know them all but we truely owe you all. God bless you Sir.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files John Skene.jpg
#4418916 - 05/03/18 03:38 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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WE REMEMBER A TRUE WORLD WAR II HERO: It is with a heavy heart that we learn the news that BATTLE OF THE CORAL SEA veteran, Mr. GORDON JOHNSON has died. He was 96.

Mr. Johnson was a telegrapher aboard the light cruiser HMAS Hobart during the famous battle of the Coral Sea, which saw ships from the United States and Australian fleets take on the mighty Japanese.

Many aboard the ships were just teenagers, wide-eyed and crazy-brave. They signed up to serve their respected nations, mostly for the adventure, only to find that in May 1942 they would be thrown together — from two continents — to fight the most important naval battle in World War II history.

The men who fought in the Battle of the Coral Sea may not be as well known in our history as veterans of Normandy, Kokoda or Iwo Jima, but there are few people to whom this country owes more thanks than the US and Australian sailors and airmen who, across two days that May, halted the Japanese advance south towards Australia and, in the process, helped to turn the tide of the Pacific War.

It was the first aircraft carrier battle ever fought, and the first in which the opposing ships never fired at each other - all attacks were carried out by aircraft with the US losing three ships in the battle, including the fleet carrier USS Lexington, while the Japanese lost five ships, including the light carrier Shoho.

While the Japanese claimed a tactical success, the strategic victory belonged to the Allies, who destroyed the Japanese carriers at the Battle of Midway the following month.

Mr. Johnson and the Hobart survived the battle and was present in Tokyo Bay when the Japanese instrument of surrender was signed in September 1945.

On behalf of TGGF and its members, thank you for your service and many sacrifices. We as American citizens have a huge debt that we can never repay to our veterans and the families who have put their lives on hold to serve our great nations, we may never know them all, but we truly owe it to you. Rest in eternal peace Mr. Gordon Johnson.

Lest We Forget.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files GORDON JOHNSON.jpg
#4418917 - 05/03/18 03:39 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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OUR GREATEST AMERICAN HEROES: Its with great sadness we learn the news that World War II Navajo Code Talker Roy Hawthorne, who used his native language as an uncrackable code during World War II, died Saturday.

At 92, he was one of the last surviving Code Talkers.

Hawthorne was 17 when he enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps and became part of a famed group of Native Americans who encoded hundreds of messages in the Navajo language to keep them safe from the Japanese. Hawthorne served in the 1st Marine Division in the Pacific Theatre and was promoted to corporal.

The code was never broken.

“The longer we live, the more we realize the importance of what we did, but we’re still not heroes — not in my mind,” Roy Hawthorne said in 2015.

But Hawthorne's son, Regan Hawthorne, said Monday his father leaves a proud legacy.

"They went in out of a sense of duty and a spirit of responsibility to their country," Regan Hawthorne said, adding he didn't know about his father's military service until he was in his 20s.

"I grew up not knowing my dad was a Code Talker. He never talked about it, didn't see the need to talk about it," he said.

The Code Talkers believed they were just doing their job, he said, and shied away from receiving accolades for their service.

"When we read about the effect the Navajo Code had on shortening the war because of its effectiveness, we think about the guys who did that," Regan Hawthorne said. "(But) they're simply humble men who performed what they sensed to be a duty to protect all they cherished."

He said his father and other Code Talkers returned home from the war and "simply came back to work and went back to making a life."

On behalf of TGGF and its members, thank you for your service and many sacrifices made to this great nation. We as American citizens have a huge debt that we can never repay our veterans and the families who have put their lives on hold to serve our great nations, we may never know them all, but we truly owe it to you.

Rest in eternal peace Mr. Hawthorne.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Roy Hawthorne.jpg
#4419042 - 05/04/18 01:54 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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My Grandfather a veteran of the pacific theater and US Army is still here at 93, but looking older every month now instead of year. It will be a sad day when these fine people are no longer with us at all. Now my dad, a Vietnam Vet is the Grandpa but really at 70 hes old enough to be a great grandpa. Time sure does go by fast.

Last edited by HitchHikingFlatlander; 05/04/18 01:55 AM.

I've got a bad feeling about this.....
#4419044 - 05/04/18 02:07 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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I respect these men very much. My father served all over Europe during WWII, in Intel. Were he still alive, he would be 99. One of my best friends is 88 and spent most of his career, in an engineering battalion, rebuilding the airfields in Europe. I visit my father's grave, in Arlington Cemetery, every year and am constantly reminded (looking at the other headstones) that many people, both big and small, did so much for so many.

They were all great men and we own them a debt that can never be repaid.


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#4419046 - 05/04/18 02:13 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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My father was RAF ground crew based in the Pacific and Indian Oceans mainly. Used to service B-24s bombing the Japanese in the (then) Dutch East Indies. He died in 2003.


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#4419060 - 05/04/18 07:35 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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And my father , who is 98 , is now in bad shape , weakening day after day , family believe he would not pass the month, hoping he can regain some strength.

He saw action on the Italian theater in spring/summer 44', then in the battle of Provence and was WIA on august, the 22th 1944 in suburbs of Marseilles, as an infantry corporal (Tirailleur=Rifleman) in the 3rd Algerian Infantry Division (colonial troops).



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#4419862 - 05/09/18 07:27 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA’S GREATEST HEROES: The last Pearl Harbor survivor from Nebraska, Mr. Ludwig "Lou" Radil. Has died, he was 98.

In Ludwig "Lou" Radil's six eventful years as a Navy yeoman, he witnessed both the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the earliest post-World War II nuclear tests in the South Pacific.

"He enjoyed being in the Navy. He had seen so much," said his son, Larry Radil of Papillion.

Lou Radil, an Omaha native, was one of the last remaining Pearl Harbor survivors in Nebraska, having escaped from the battleship USS California after it was torpedoed in the Japanese attack.

Radil grew up in the Brown Park neighborhood, and attended Omaha South High School, one of six children. Before World War II, he worked in a meat-packing plant and for a soft-drink bottler.

In 1941, Radil, 22, joined the Navy and arrived at Pearl Harbor in August. He became the ship's librarian aboard the California.

The morning of Dec. 7, he and two other sailors were setting up deck chairs for church services when the first Japanese planes flew over, Radil told a World-Herald reporter in 2001. Then bombs began to fall on nearby Ford Island.

"We got a torpedo hit, and then another, and then a bomb hit," Radil said in an account reprinted in a 2011 World-Herald book about Nebraskans in World War II. "We started listing to one side. We got word that the ship was sinking and might capsize. So the captain ordered a call to abandon ship."

He jumped into the water, dodging a burning oil slick. Radil swam about 200 yards to Ford Island, soaked with oil but unharmed. The next day, he helped remove the bodies of the nearly 100 sailors who were killed.

"Even thinking about it gets tears in my eyes," Radil said in 2001.

Radil remained at Pearl Harbor, but his son said he knows little about Lou Radil's service during the rest of the war. But after World War II ended, he was assigned to the USS Cumberland Sound, a seaplane tender. The ship traveled to the Bikini Atoll in the spring of 1946, where the crew observed the first two postwar tests of nuclear weapons.

Radil left the Navy in 1947 and returned to the meat-packing industry. Later he became a federal food inspector. He married in 1949 and had two sons. His wife died in the mid-1960s.

Larry said his father enjoyed fishing, camping and playing baseball.

"He was very friendly, enjoyed life," Larry Radil said. "He'd make friends with anybody."

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Lou Radil.jpg
#4419947 - 05/10/18 01:40 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Honestly...

The BEST memorial we could leave for theses folks is to make sure their kids do not have to do it again.


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#4420819 - 05/14/18 10:19 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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OUR GREATEST AMERICAN HEROES: Battle of Iwo Jima veteran Mr. Robert Lee. Mell III has died. He was 93.

Born on July 13, 1924 in McConnelsville, Ohio, Mr. Mell enlisted in the Marines at age 16 with his mother’s permission. He served in the Marine Corps and Marine Corps Reserves for 31 years and also fought in the Korean War, and served in the Navy and Naval Reserves for six years.

Robert Lee Mell III could recall exactly where he was and what was happening the day the United States raised its flag on Mount Suribachi during the Battle of Iwo Jima in World War II.

A sergeant in the Marines, Mr. Mell recounted the uncomfortable and unnerving experience of navigating Iwo Jima’s Pacific beaches in an excerpt he wrote as part of Veterans History Project with the Library of Congress:

The sand was deep black in color and very hot. You wrapped into a pancho at night and become soaking wet. You could bury a can of water in the sand it came out very hot.

On February 23rd the flag was raised on Mt. Suribachi. Ships in the harbor blew horns and whistles and all the men cheered. It was quite the occasion.

In civilian life, he worked for U.S. Steel’s wheel and axle division in McKees Rocks for 35 years up until his retirement. He also owned and operated a bar and restaurant with his wife and brother-in-law for 18 years, the Jackman Inn in Avalon.

On behalf of TGGF and its members, those who served, and those who continue to serve in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, and Coast Guard took an oath to uphold and protect the Constitution against all enemies foreign and domestic, and we can never forget the importance of their commitment to our Nation. RIP Mr. Robert Lee. Mell III

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files RobertLee.jpg
#4420913 - 05/15/18 03:41 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: kaa]  
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Originally Posted by kaa
And my father , who is 98 , is now in bad shape , weakening day after day , family believe he would not pass the month, hoping he can regain some strength.

He saw action on the Italian theater in spring/summer 44', then in the battle of Provence and was WIA on august, the 22th 1944 in suburbs of Marseilles, as an infantry corporal (Tirailleur=Rifleman) in the 3rd Algerian Infantry Division (colonial troops).



7th RTA/ 3ème DIA.


My dad passed away last week . He had been awarded the Legion d'Honneur, Croix de Guerre, Médaille Militaire, Volunteer Cross, Italy, France and WW2 campaigns medals, WIA red star medal. About the action he has been wounded in, he told me last year:" I even did not hesitate, no time for hesitation nor fear, I did it automatically and I would do it again now if necessary without any problem." PTSD anyone ?


"Anyone can shoot you down if you don't see him coming but it takes a wonderfully good Hun to bag a Camel if you're expecting him."
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#4420916 - 05/15/18 03:46 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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I Salute your Dad KAA,,And that's not PTSD quite a few Vets would feel the same We went for own reasons and beliefs..I took and oath to Defend my country and nobody has released me from that..


Russ
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#4420917 - 05/15/18 03:48 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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I’m very sorry for your loss kaa. RIP to your gallant father.


“Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And if you gaze long enough into an abyss, the abyss will gaze back into you.”
#4420944 - 05/15/18 07:22 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: PanzerMeyer]  
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Originally Posted by PanzerMeyer
I’m very sorry for your loss kaa. RIP to your gallant father.


+1

#4421105 - 05/16/18 09:10 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Thank you for your kind words, very appreciated !


"Anyone can shoot you down if you don't see him coming but it takes a wonderfully good Hun to bag a Camel if you're expecting him."
Tom Cundall.
#4421507 - 05/19/18 03:04 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Floyd Carter Sr., one of the remaining Tuskegee Airmen and NYPD veteran, dies at 95


Floyd Carter Sr., one of the last of the Tuskegee Airmen, dedicated his remarkable life to serving his country and his city.

The decorated veteran of three wars and 27 years with the NYPD died Thursday at age 95, leaving a long legacy as a groundbreaking hero pilot and a city police detective.

Carter, who simultaneously rose through the ranks of the U.S. Air Force Reserves and the police, was honored in 2007 with the Congressional Gold Medal by President Bush for breaking the color barrier in Tuskegee.

"We mourn the loss of a true American hero," read a tweet from the 47th Precinct in his adopted home of the Bronx. "Our community & nation has lost a giant."

Carter rose to the rank of Air Force lieutenant colonel years after joining the group of African-American pilots at Tuskegee University.

He met his wife Atherine there, where the Alabama native was working as part of an all-female repair crew.

Carter wooed his bride-to-be on several dates in his plane, and they were married at the air base in 1945.

In 2012, Carter joined "Star Wars" filmmaker George Lucas for a screening of his film "Red Tails" about the Tuskegee Airmen — the first black aviators in the U.S. military, trained in Alabama as a segregated unit.

In addition to serving during World War II, Carter flew during the Korean and Vietnam wars and led the first squadron of supply-laden planes into Berlin during the famed Cold War airlift of 1948-49.

During the Tet Offensive, Carter flew U.S. troops and supplies into South Vietnam.

His NYPD duties included work as a bodyguard for visiting heads of state, and Carter spent time with Cuban leader Fidel Castro and Soviet head Nikita Khrushchev, recalled his son Floyd Jr.

He earned a half-dozen citations for his outstanding police work, and survived a number of shootouts with armed bandits.

"He's got a little history," said Floyd Jr. "We were blessed, we sure were. He went from what I call the outhouse to the fine house. The Lord blessed him."

The Yorktown, Va., native joined the Army Air Corps in 1944, and was commissioned a year later as a 2nd lt. bombardier navigator.

In 1946, he received his pilot wings and transferred a year later to the Air Force Reserves. By the end of his tenure in 1974, he was commander of the 732nd Military Airlift Squadron at McGuire Air Force Base in New Jersey.

Carter joined the NYPD in 1953, earned his detective's gold shield within three years, and retired in 1980.

He once recalled talking politics with Castro, and believed the federal government needed to open a dialogue with the bearded Communist.

Oddly enough, Carter was called up for active duty during the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis.

Carter remained active into his 90s, serving in November 2015 as the grand marshal of the annual Veterans Day Parade in the Bronx. He was honored by ex-Congressman Charles Rangel in 2005 with a proclamation for his lifelong achievements.

Carter was survived by his wife of more than seven decades and their two children, Floyd Jr. and Rozalind, along with grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Funeral arrangements were not yet finalized.

Attached Files QIICNVWESAH56F45CC5L4BGD6Q.jpg
#4423664 - 05/31/18 10:49 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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OUR GREATEST AMERICAN HEROES: It’s with a heavy heart that we learn the news that World War II veteran Robert Smith known to the world as the 'Singing Grandpa' has died. He was 100.

World War II veteran Robert Smith was affectionately known as "the singing grandpa." He celebrated his 100th birthday with national recognition in February.

Born and raised in Cincinnati, Smith could be called the Queen City's No. 1 fan. He's a big fan of Skyline Chili, Frisch's, Graeter's Ice Cream and Montgomery Inn barbecue, to name a few. He's been in singing groups since high school, family members said, earning him his endearing title.

Smith, a rifleman, served in Germany during the Berlin occupation, and later moved across the river to Kentucky.

Just months after becoming a centenarian, Smith's family said he died peacefully at his home this week. They said they are all heartbroken.

On behalf of TGGF and its members, we salute Mr. Smith for his dedication and service to our FREEDOM.

“Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Smith.jpg
#4423671 - 05/31/18 11:16 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Yes a well deserved Salute !!! to both Lt.Col.Carter and Robert Smith


Russ
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#4425840 - 06/12/18 10:10 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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OUR GREATEST AMERICAN HEROES: World War II Veteran and Navajo Code Talker Samuel Tom Holiday Dies at Age 94.

ST. GEORGE, Utah — Samuel Tom Holiday, one of the last surviving Navajo Code Talkers, died in southern Utah Monday surrounded by family members.

Holiday was among hundreds of Navajos who used a code based on their native language to transmit messages in World War II. The Japanese never broke it.

He was 19 when he joined the Marine Corps and became a part of operations in several locations across the Pacific during the war, according to The Spectrum. A mortar explosion left him with hearing loss, but he would later tell family that he always felt safe during battle because of a pouch around his neck holding sacred stones and yellow corn pollen.

He received a Congressional Silver Medal, a Purple Heart and other recognition for his action during the conflict.

“Where Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Samuel Tom Holiday.jpg
#4426120 - 06/14/18 12:29 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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#4427103 - 06/22/18 03:09 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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OUR GREATEST AMERICAN HEROES: Band of Brothers veteran and Paratrooper of the famed 101st Airborne Division, Mr. Alvin Richard Henderson has died. He was 94.

Mr. Henderson was a Paratrooper with the 101st Airborne Screaming Eagles 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment during DDAY in Normandy and in Holland during Operation Market Garden. It was in Holland when he was captured while helping a fellow soldier who had been shot outside the island.

He was a Prisoner of War for 9 months. He received the Purple Heart, Bronze Star, Combat Infantry Badge, POW medal, and the Presidential Citation.

At the end of WWII he returned home and earned his economics and accounting degree from Susquehanna University in Pennsylvania. He married the love of his life, Bonnie Manning, in 1952. They have lived in Pickens, SC since 1954.

Throughout the years, Mr. Handerson made several returns back to the battlefields with The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation.

On behalf of TGGF and its members, we salute Mr. Henderson for his dedication and service to our freedom.

“Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Alvin Richard Henderson.jpg
#4427894 - 06/27/18 02:13 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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OUR GREATEST AMERICAN HEROES: It’s with a heavy heart that we learn the news that Pearl Harbor Survivor and World War II veteran, Mr. Arnhold Schwichtenberg has passed away due to injuries sustained in a car accident on May 27, 2018. He was 96 when he passed.

Arnie was born on July 16, 1921 in Bayonne, NJ was a Chief machinist on the USS Trever. He served six years in the Navy and later in the war was aboard the USS Steele DE-8 in the South Pacific.

Once leaving the service, his family relocated to Oakdale California where he raised his family and farmed almonds. Arnie worked as a machinist, tool and die maker for Norris Industries and Gallo Winery.

Arnie was an active member in the Pearl Harbor Survivor Association and served as president of numerous chapters. Arnie truly lived life to the fullest and enjoyed traveling all around the world, he loved golf, food, music, teaching younger generations about Pearl Harbor by speaking at local schools, and veteran's associations. After retirement, Arnie and Lilly moved to Barefoot Bay Florida near the Atlantic coast. The Schwichtenberg's are a close family and Arnie spent the majority of his time surrounded by them and many people he loved.

Arnie and Lilly were married for a total of 52 years and "Mamma" was his entire world. Arnie was a dedicated patriot who loved this country. He showcased this best when reciting the Pledge of Allegiance and giving his Flag Salute speech, where he proudly described the meaning of Old Glory.

On behalf of TGGF and its members, our condolences to his family and friends. We salute Mr. Schwichtenberg for his dedication and service to our FREEDOM.

Photo Caption: Pearl Harbor survivors Arnold Schwichtenberg, (left), with good friend Mr. Charlie Boswell (right) salute during the Pearl Harbor Day ceremony.

“Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Schwichtenberg.jpg
#4427895 - 06/27/18 02:13 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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OUR GREATEST AMERICAN HEROES: It’s with a heavy heart that we learn the news that World War II veteran, Mr. William “Jimmy” Phillips has passed away. He was 92.

In November 1946, PFC William “Jimmy” Phillips was discharged from an 11-month stint in the U.S. Army after World War II.

Phillips, 20 at the time, had a choice — stay at Fort Dix, N.J. where he was being separated and receive his service medals or catch a train back to Middletown and re-start his life. He opted to go home.

World War II veteran William “Jimmy” Phillips gives a fist pump after receiving his long-awaited war medals during a ceremony earlier this year at Woodlands of Middletown Assisted Living facility. Phillips has waited nearly 70 years since his discharge to receive his medals.

He was awarded the Army Good Conduct Medal, Europe-Africa Middle Eastern Campaign Medal, World War II Victory Medal and the Army of Occupation Medal during the ceremony.

On behalf of TGGF and its members, our condolences to his family and friends. We salute Mr. Phillips for his dedication and service to our FREEDOM.

“Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Phillips.jpg
#4427907 - 06/27/18 08:13 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Salute Mr.Phillips It saddens me to see these gentlemen pass Think i'll re-read Tom Brokaws book just to remember what they were


Russ
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#4430305 - 07/14/18 01:08 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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OUR GREATEST AMERICAN HEROES: Mr. Paul McKenzie Llufrio Sr., a decorated World War II veteran who survived being a prisoner of war has died. He was 95.

Born in Baltimore and raised on South Poppleton Street, he was the son of William Llufrio, a United Railways streetcar conductor, and his wife, Lena Carolyn Seibert.

He was the 12th of 15 children born to his parents. After completing the eighth grade at the old St. Peter the Apostle School, he began working at a neighborhood grocery store, where his parents had an account.

He learned to cut meat and did other jobs. He later became a bellman at the Lord Baltimore Hotel. He later told family members it was a favorite job — he met visiting celebrities, and he would go fishing with pals from the hotel.

In 1943 he enlisted in the Army and was assigned to the 3rd Infantry Division. He was trained as a heavy machine gunner and sent to North Africa. He later participated in three amphibious landings: at Salerno in Sicily, at Anzio in Italy and at a beach near Marseilles in France. He fought in heavy combat during these operations but was never struck by fire.

Mr. Llufrio was present when Rome was liberated in June 1944. He and his company were received by Pope Pius XII, who gave Mr. Llufrio a papal blessing.

He was sent to France and fought in the Rhone Valley as a part of Operation Dragoon. He was in a campaign to open a second front in France that would bring needed supplies to Allied forces after the invasion at Normandy.

While fighting in Alsace in 1945, he was captured by enemy forces after a farmer’s wife — who was of German descent — turned him in as he took cover in a barn. He spent the last three months of the war in prison camps, including one outside Frankfurt. He also recalled surviving a bombing of Munich, when he and others were not allowed to take cover in an air raid bunker.

He was liberated in May 1945 by his 3rd Division. He was transported to a French hospital for treatment and later recuperated in Miami at the Hotel Poincianna. He weighed 114 pounds and was down to a 27-inch waist. His normal weight had been 145 pounds.

Mr. Llufrio was awarded the Bronze Star, the French Croix de Guerre and the French Fourragère, a unit decoration.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Paul McKenzie Llufrio.jpg
#4435048 - 08/20/18 04:33 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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ROLL CALL: It is with an heavy heart, we learn the news that World War II veteran Mr. Gene Stephens, the last original member of the Military Police Corps, a branch of the Army officially formed in 1941, has died, five weeks after he turned 100.

Born in Edinburg, Texas, Stephens was in his early 20s when he was drafted into the Army in 1941 during World War II.

He witnessed history during his service, which ended in 1945. Stephens escorted Gen. Dwight Eisenhower frequently at Eisenhower’s Bushy Park camp in London. He escorted President Franklin D. Roosevelt in Algeria when the former president was on his way to meet Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin in Tehran.

While in London, Stephens once pulled over a sedan going over the speed limit only to find out he accidentally pulled over the general himself.

In 2016, Stephens received the association’s Order of Marechaussee award at the 75th anniversary of the military police’s formation. At the association’s ball, held in Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, a general awarded Stephens the medals he received during his service in a ceremony that wasn’t performed in the ’40s.

You will be remembered and revered always for you were part of something truly incredible. You stood in the path of one of the most significant forces of evil this world has ever seen, and you and your brothers in arms said, "this far, no further." And with God on your side, you men stopped the onslaught. This world owes you all a debt of gratitude.

RIP Mr. Stephens.

"Where Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org
Email: info@tggf.org

Attached Files 39522384_1780408492008397_4923559798701555712_o.jpg
#4435205 - 08/21/18 04:24 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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From: Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum, Charleston, SC

It is with very heavy hearts that we share the recent death of yet another one of our volunteers, Mr. Marvin Veronee. A 12-year volunteer at our museum, Marvin went ashore with 70,000 Marines at Iwo Jima as a Navy gunfire officer and served there for 36 days. The then 19-year old called in fire from warships stationed off the coast. While on Iwo Jima, he escaped a Japanese banzai charge (suicide attack) and saw the original raising of the American flag on Mount Surabachi that created the iconic photograph.

Mr. Veronee was frequently found here at the information desk on the USS Yorktown, graciously sharing the stories of his service with our guests. A native sea islander from the Charleston area, Marvin will be remembered at a service this weekend, August 26, at Camp St. Christopher in Johns Island, SC.

Attached Files 39868593_10157195572477788_5799811991275044864_n.jpg
#4437393 - 09/05/18 09:11 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: It's with great sadness, we learn the news that World War II veteran Mr. Ed “Doc” Pepping of the famed 101st Airborne Division, made famous by the HBO mini-series Band of Brothers has died.

As a boy, Ed Pepping was fascinated with tales of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table, who he described as, "extraordinary warriors who lived with service, honor, and valor." He adopted their creed.

Ed joined the paratroops, and at Toccoa, GA passed the tests to become a medic and a founding member of Easy Company, assigned to 3rd platoon under Lt. Fred "Moose" Heyliger.

Ed jumped on D-Day and received a Bronze Star for Valor after just one day in Normandy, on June 7, 1944. Col. Bill Turner, the CO of the 1st Battalion of the 506th, directed a tank's fire against a German gun emplacement. Behind his tank was a line of six others, waiting to enter the fight. A German sniper shot Turner in the head, causing him to fall into the turret of the lead tank. Ed ran to his aid and pulled him from the tank, but Turner died in his arms. Ed's Bronze Star award reads:

"Acting without regard for his own life or safety, he attempted to save the life of a battalion commander who had fallen critically wounded on top of the tank commander, not only halting the advance of the six-tank column but making the whole column potential targets for destruction by the enemy as well."

Days later, Ed was himself wounded, probably by artillery, in Carentan. He awoke with his leg in a cast. Though he then went AWOL to rejoin Easy Company, his wounds prevented him from future combat.

On behalf of TGGF and its members, we salute Mr. Pepping for his devotion of service to our freedom.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files doc.jpg
#4443822 - 10/15/18 07:18 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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We were saddened to hear of the passing of WWII Veteran Warren Schmitt this morning. Mr Schmitt was part of the group from Forever Young Senior Veterans of Alabama that took part in our WWII Heritage Days event earlier this year. During the war, Warren was assigned to the 456th Bomber Group of the 15th Air Force in Foggia, Italy, where he was part of 13 missions to targets in Northern Italy, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia, Germany and Austria. He was injured on one of those missions and received the Purple Heart. Interestingly, he also survived a mid-air collision with another B-24 during training in Nevada. We are so glad he was able to attend the event and go up in the B-17 as our guest during the veterans flight. Today we remember his service to his country, his infection smile, and the impression he made on all of us in such a short period of time! Photo by John Willhoff during his ride in the CAF Gulf Coast Wing's B-17 Texas Raiders at WWII HD 2018.

http://wwiidays.org/

Attached Files Warren Schmitt.jpg
#4443830 - 10/15/18 08:11 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Sad to see these men slip into eternity. Godspeed.


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#4444661 - 10/21/18 03:53 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Ferrill A. Purdy, 96, died Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018, surrounded by his family.

Services will be held at Bach-Yager Funeral Chapel with visitation at 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 20, 2018, and funeral services following at 11 a.m. Burial will be at Columbia Cemetery.

Ferrill was born June 5, 1922, in Bosworth, Missouri, to Floyd Roschel Purdy and Mable Alexia (Winfrey) Purdy, and they preceded him in death. He was a 1940 graduate of Bosworth High School and entered into the United States Navy in 1941. He became commissioned as a United States Marine Fighter Pilot in 1943 and served until 1946. He joined the USMC-R from 1946-64. He graduated from William Jewel College and the University of Missouri before being asked to become a member of the faculty and teach pharmacology and physiology for 38 years before retiring. He really enjoyed teaching his students. He also loved fishing and hunting.

He married El Loise Jennings on Feb. 28, 1954, and she survives. They have two children, who also survive, Gayla Maier (Roger) and Greg Purdy, both of Columbia; and a niece and nephew. Ferrill is also survived by his adopted families, the Sprys, the Crewses and the Adamses.

He is also preceded in death by one brother, Edmond Dale Purdy.

In lieu of flowers, donations are suggested to Planes of Fame Air Museum, 14998 Cal Aero Drive, Chino, California, 91710 and all donations will go specifically to the plane he flew during World War II so they can keep it flying. (Please put “Purdy or Corsair” in the memo line of your check.) You can also send a donation to the University of Missouri Cardiology Department, c/o Bach-Yager Funeral Chapel, 1610 N. Garth Ave., Columbia, MO 65202.

https://www.columbiamissourian.com/...9cf2be-d2f4-11e8-a170-072e30a3f2e7.html?



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http://SimHQ.com/forum/ubbthreads.p...um-s-corsair-proved-to-be-combat-veteran

Attached Files Purdy.jpg
#4444686 - 10/21/18 12:15 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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#4444762 - 10/21/18 10:30 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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#4449991 - 11/22/18 03:29 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Oldest surviving veteran of Pearl Harbor dies at 106


Ray Chavez, the oldest surviving veteran of Pearl Harbor, died Wednesday in California at the age of 106.

“Ray was the epitome of the greatest generation,” said Richard Rovsek, a trustee of the nonprofit Spirit of Liberty Foundation in Rancho Santa Fe, The San Diego Union-Tribune reported. “He was always proud to be an American and proud of the military.”

Kathleen Chavez, who had been her father’s live-in caregiver for more than 20 years, said Ray who'd been in hospice care, asked to be buried at Miramar National Cemetery in San Diego.

He was born in San Bernardino in 1911 and grew up in San Diego’s Old Town and Logan Heights communities; his large family ran a wholesale flower business, the news outlet said.

At 27, in 1938, he joined the Navy and was stationed with the minesweeper Condor at Pearl Harbor. On Dec. 7, 1941, he was a seaman first class; after the attack, he spent the next nine days on continuous duty in and around Pearl Harbor, the paper said.

He once said the horrors he saw at Pearl Harbor left deep trauma.

Attached Files Ray-Chavez.jpg
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Yesterday I went the funeral of the wife of my old friend Doug from the Royal Navy. She was almost 90 and had been married to Doug almost 70 years. Her grandson gave a tribute that ended by reading a letter that Doug had written to her in 1943 while at sea. They don't know where he was at the time. It was very poignant and ended with " it is hard being away from you for such a long time. We will be together soon "

They are together now forever.


Archie Smythe

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#4451491 - 12/02/18 08:23 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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100-year-old Bugler Albert Madden Laid to Rest in Massachusetts

Albert Madden played taps countless times at military funerals during the past century.

On Friday afternoon, the solemn melody was played for him during a funeral with full military honors and a three-volley salute at Massachusetts National Cemetery.

Madden, 100, a U.S. Army veteran who served during World War II, the Korean War and Vietnam War, died at his Hyannis home on Nov. 25.

"I think he would have been proud of the ceremony," said his son, David Madden, of East Sandwich. "The military played a very big role in his life."

In addition to his service to the country, the elder Madden leaves behind a musical legacy that began as a child playing the bugle, trumpet and coronet and lasted a lifetime.

He played throughout the world as a member of the Army's 9th Infantry Division Band, and back home with the Barnstable Town Band.

While he could certainly play the pop tunes of the big band era and beyond, it was his rendition of taps at veterans observances, memorials and funerals for which he will be most remembered.

At the age of 92, he was invited by the Pentagon to play taps on arguably the melancholy bugle call's biggest stage: Arlington National Cemetery.

"I'll be the oldest bugler, using the oldest horn, to ever play taps at the Arlington cemetery," he told a Times reporter in 2010.

He even played the horn at his own 100th birthday earlier this year, according to his son.

World War II veteran John Kelley, 92, braved the late-November chill to bid farewell to Madden.

"He was a very dedicated man," Kelley said. "He played at every single veteran's memorial event on Cape Cod."

The honor of playing taps at Madden's funeral went to longtime friend Daniel LePage, who drove him to the engagement at Arlington eight years ago.

Like Madden, LePage played the tune live during the ceremony, a tradition that has become less common in recent years, with many services now featuring recorded versions.

Madden, realizing in his later years that playing taps was becoming a lost art, would don his military uniform and play at veterans' funerals upon request, his son said.

Madden's daughter-in-law Debra addressed the nearly 50 mourners who gathered for the committal ceremony.

"As we speak, he is probably conducting a band of angels," she said. "Let's not mourn his death, let's celebrate his life. One hundred years is a lot to celebrate."

Attached Files bugleralbermadden1800.png.jpg
#4451565 - 12/03/18 12:06 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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#4454425 - 12/22/18 08:18 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: It is with great sadness that we learn the news that World War II veteran Mr. Karl E. Petersen, has died. He was 96.

Petersen was born March 11, 1922, in Warren, Pennsylvania to Danish parents, Karl and Olga Petersen. As the oldest of four siblings, Petersen grew up in Warren and graduated from Warren High School in 1940.

He enlisted in the United States Army in 1942 and served for three years in Europe during World War II as a communication technician in the 461st Anti-Aircraft Battalion, 69th Infantry Division.

Landing on Omaha Beach, France, on D-Day plus 7 – June 13, 1944 – it moved all the way to the Elbe River by April 25, 1945, distinguishing itself in many historic battles.

In May 1945, his unit was stationed near a hospital in Leipzig, Germany where he met a German nurse named Anita. The two spent time communicating for six weeks with the help from Petersen’s German-English dictionary until his unit was shipped back to the states, according to his daughter. Petersen and Anita wrote to each other for two years until she agreed to marry him.

In December 1948, he paid Anita’s fare to travel to the United States and were soon married on Jan. 15, 1949 in Warren, Pennsylvania. Years later, they drove across the country with their three daughters Judy, Christa, and Karlene after Petersen transferred his mail carrier job to the Newhall, California post office in 1964.

Soon after, Petersen purchased a home in Saugus where he lived with his family until he passed away.

On behalf of TGGF and its members, we salute Mr. Karl E. Petersen for his dedication and service to our freedom. You will never be forgotten.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Karl E. Petersen.jpg
#4454426 - 12/22/18 08:18 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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A 99-year-old Normandy World War II veteran has died and there's an appeal to invite people to his funeral.

Mr. Alfred Smith will be laid to rest at St Laurence and All Saints in Southend on Wednesday, December 19, and an appeal for mourners has since been launched.

Mr. Smith joined the Royal Army Service Corps during World War II, where he was evacuated from Dunkirk and went on to take part in the D-Day landings before being hospitalised by a shrapnel injury.

Mr. Smith then spent around six to seven months at a hospital in Brussels, where he was unable to stand or walk, before being transferred to a hospital in Stratford-Upon-Avon.

In 2015, Mr. Smith was awarded the Legion of d’Honneaur for his bravery- the highest honour a soldier can receive from the French Military. Mr. Smith also obtained the French and German Star, the Battle of Britain, the Defence Medal and War Medal 1939-1945.

He sadly passed away peacefully and will be honoured by his community. However, the local community are also invited to pay their respects to the war hero.

Next June marks the 75th anniversary of the D-Day Landings and the Battle of Normandy, which will be commemorated with a pilgrimage to the landing sites, one that Mr. Alfred planned to attend.

The event is due to be attended by veterans, serving military, as well as world leaders and politicians to pay tribute to those who fought and lost their lives in the conflict.

Michelle Turner-Everett, who runs the SSAFA Southend Lunch Club for veterans every Thursday, said: “It’s always incredibly sad to lose a treasured member of our local veteran community – but I hope that our send-off does him proud. "Aside from serving our country, Mr. Alfred was a wonderful man and we are lucky to have known him.”

His funeral service will be held at St Laurence and All Saints, Eastwood, on December 19 at 1.00pm – those wishing to pay their respects are welcome.

To any veteran in the local area wishing to attend the SSAFA Southend Lunch Club – get in touch with Michelle on: Chel.Turner-Everett@Essex.ssafa.org.uk

"Everyday is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Alfred Smith.jpg
#4454427 - 12/22/18 08:19 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: It's with great sadness that we learn the news that Harold Garrish, a survivor of Pearl Harbor has died. He was 100. Harold Garrish was a lieutenant commander in the Navy. According to Garrish’s family and friends, he led a full life after the war, including going to a ballroom dance class five days a week until he died, and skydiving when he was 97.

Thank you for your service and sacrifice to our nation.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest Generations Foundation

Attached Files Harold Garrish.jpg
#4454470 - 12/22/18 11:55 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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They will live a long time, these men of the South Pacific. They had an American quality. They, like their victories, will be remembered as long
as our generation lives. After that, like the men of the Confederacy, they
will become strangers. Longer and longer shadows will obcure them until
their Guadalcanal sounds distant on the ear like Shiloh and Valley Forge.

James Mitchener.... Tales of The South Pacific

Guadalcanal may already "sound distant on the ear", but while distance is
inevitable, inmortality is not.

#4456720 - 01/10/19 01:42 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: Its with great sadness, our nation lost a true American hero today Technical Sergeant Wilber (Bill) Brunger, proud member of the U.S. Army 289th Regiment, 75th Infantry Division. He was 95.

Born on 25 Apr 1923 in Denver, Colorado and graduated from South High School in Denver, Class of 1940, Mr. Brunger was a platoon Sgt and entered combat with Company B, 1st Battalion, 289th Regiment, 75th Infantry Division on 24 December 1944 during the Battle of the Bulge in the Ardennes-Alsace campaign.

Mr. Brunger significant military awards include the Combat Infantry Badge, Bronze Star with V and three clusters, Good Conduct, American Campaign European-African-Middle East with three battle stars, World War II Victory and French Campaign Croix de la Campagne Rhin et Danube.

With Respect, Honor, and Gratitude. Your sacrifice will never be forgotten Bill.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Brunger.jpg
#4456721 - 01/10/19 01:43 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: World War II veteran Mr. Roy Carter who survived the attack on Pearl Harbor — and was a candidate for the Congressional Medal of Honor for his actions that saved the lives of eight men on the USS Oklahoma that day — has died. Roy D. Carter was 98.

Mr. Carter, who retired from the U.S. Navy at the rank of lieutenant commander, escaped the sinking battleship USS Oklahoma after torpedoes tore through the heart of the ship Dec. 7, 1941.

Carter, like everyone else on board and in the Pacific fleet, said he had no clue about the incoming Japanese invasion.

While he was three decks below in the carpenter shop, he heard an alert: “Air attack! No Sh—! All hands man your battle stations. Set conditions zed!”

Said Carter, in a 2010 interview: “These were the last words we heard in the damage control section.”

Carter said his battle station was to lock down a watertight door with eight handles and a watertight hatch that could only be opened from the third deck.

Torpedoes hit while Carter locked the door, and the Oklahoma began tipping. He felt the thumps as the bombs barraged the middle of the ship.

“You could feel every impact,” he said. “If there was an explosion sound, I didn’t hear it because it was far from my mind.”

The attack took out the ship’s lights and communications, but the worst part, he recalled, was that by locking down the door he sealed eight quartermasters into their stations below him.

Knowing his only option was to leave, Carter began climbing out on his hands and knees as water and oil drenched him from head to foot. Somehow none of the doors above him had been sealed and he climbed out before the ship turned over and pulled him under.

“If I had taken one more minute and the men above me had closed the watertight hatches, I’d be dead,” Carter recalled.

He later discovered that the eight men below him were saved by his efforts. After the ship flipped, the quartermasters were trapped for 30 hours but were safe from that rising water and oil that the door kept out. They banged and hammered the hull and pipes to let people know they were inside and eventually they were cut free.

“I felt I saved eight guys that day,” Carter said.

All told, 429 souls — Navy men and Marines — lost their life on the USS Oklahoma in the attack.

“I don’t know the amount that were killed by torpedoes but there were a lot who starved to death or drowned while trapped,” he said.

While swimming to a nearby ship, high-altitude bombers dropped bombs within 100 yards but somehow none went off, he said.

Years later, Carter was reintroduced to one of the eight quartermasters, Bud Kennedy, who lived in Port Angeles until his death.

An Iowa boy, Carter was 18 years old when he joined the U.S. Navy. After boot camp, Carter and three buddies from Company 19 were assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was stationed in Bremerton.

Eventually Carter was promoted to senior damage control man in the rear portion of the ship.

Following his service on the Oklahoma, he served for three months on the USS Pelias, a submarine support craft, before being offered flight training.

Carter was commissioned as a naval aviator and served on active duty for seven years, mostly in Europe. He flew a B-24 that carried special weapons such as depth charges and torpedoes.

Following his duty, he stayed in the naval reserves for 13 years. Carter said he was most proud of receiving his flight wings and being commissioned as an officer.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Carter.jpg
#4456722 - 01/10/19 01:44 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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NEVER FORGET: ONE of the last remaining veterans of the Dunkirk evacuation has died aged 98.

Arthur Taylor, of Christchurch, was one of the 330,000 men rescued from the beaches of the French town after spending nearly two days being shot at and shelled by the Germans.

The RAF radio operator witnessed comrades stood next to him cut down by machine gun fire from Nazi planes.

He queued for 36 hours before getting on a ‘little ship’ that took him back to England in May 1940.

Arthur channelled the famous ‘Dunkirk spirit’ to rejoin the war effort and played his part in the crucial Battle of Britain three months later.

In his latter years he was heavily involved with the Association of Dunkirk Little Ships organisation and led the veterans’ parade in Dunkirk for the 75th anniversary of Operation Dynamo in 2015.

He also described in harrowing detail the evacuation to director Christopher Nolan, which helped him produce his 2017 movie Dunkirk. Arthur was a VIP guest for the film’s premiere in London.

After Dunkirk, he was then posted to RAF Hawkinge and RAF Lympne in Kent during the Battle of Britain where he worked as ground crew on Spitfires.

After the war he was demobbed but rejoined the RAF six months later as he couldn’t settle into civilian life. He served for 36 more years, including in Hong Kong, Kenya and Singapore during the Malayan Emergency in the 1950s.

Arthur had six children, 13 grandchildren and 12 great grandchildren.

On Behalf of TGGF and its members, we salute Mr. Taylor for his dedication and service to our freedom.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Taylor.jpg
#4456723 - 01/10/19 01:46 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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CHICAGO — World War II African-American fighter pilot John Lyle, a Tuskegee Airman, is dead at age 98.

Lyle's wife, Eunice, says he died Saturday at his home on Chicago's South Side. He had been battling prostate cancer.

The members of the nation's first black fighter squadron won acclaim for their aerial prowess and bravery, despite a military that imposed segregation on its African American recruits while respecting the rights of German prisoners. In 2007, President George W. Bush and Congress bestowed the Congressional Gold Medal on members of the squadron.

Lyle, who named his plane "Natalie" after his first wife, was credited with shooting down a German Messerschmitt.

After the war, Lyle worked for the Chicago Park District and founded a tree-trimming company.

In addition to his wife, Lyle is survived by three step-children.

Attached Files jack+lyle+antonio+perez+chicago+tribune.png
#4459552 - 02/01/19 07:34 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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WE REMEMBER: Its great sadness that we learn the news that World War II Heroe Mr. Fred Sutherland, one of two surviving members of Squadron 617, known later as the Dambusters has died.

The legendary unit dropped new high-tech "bouncing bombs" in 1943 on a German dam that was a key part of Adolf Hitler's industrial war machine.

In an interview last spring, Sutherland said that day stuck in his mind for 75 years.

"I was scared, I was really scared," he said. "But you can't say, 'Oh, I want to go home now.' You made up your mind and you can't let the crew down."

Fifty-three of the 133 airmen were killed. At least 1,300 others on the ground died from the bombings and subsequent floods.

Sutherland, a front gunner, was honoured for his bravery in April 2018 with a portrait by renowned painter Dan Llywelyn Hall. It was donated to the Bomber Command Museum of Canada in Nanton.

he Dambusters raid was considered a critical morale booster on the homefront, heavily damaging Hitler's dams. But the legacy was complicated due to the civilian deaths, and the fact that the war continued.

That wasn't lost on Sutherland, who was only 20 years old at the time of the raid.

"If you think something's right, you're going to fight for it," he said at the portrait unveiling. "I don't know the answer, but I know I'd do it again, even knowing what it was like."

In a later operation, Sutherland bailed out of a bomber and spent three months trying to escape Nazi-occupied Europe.

Following the war, he went on to study forestry. He then worked in that field in Rocky Mountain House, far south of his hometown of Peace River.

He was married to his wife Margaret for 73 years until her death in 2017. They had three children.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Sutherland.jpg
#4459553 - 02/01/19 07:34 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: It is with a heavy heart we learn the news that Mr. Albert A. Circelli, the man who prepared the table for the Japanese surrender in Tokyo Bay has passed away. He was 93

Born to Crescenzo and Antoinette Pastorelli Circelli on October 19, 1925, in Utica. Mr. Circelli joined the “CCC” Civilian Conservation Corps., right out of high school and subsequently began his work career with the Topper Beer Co, Balayntine Beer Co. and had a long and enjoyable career with the West End Brewery, until his retirement. Mr. Circelli was proud of his Italian Heritage and was an American Patriot through and through.

Mr. Circelli proudly served his country in the US Navy and was a veteran of World War II and the Korean War. He served aboard the USS Missouri and was present on the ship when they announced the Japanese would sign the surrender to America.

Mr. Circelli carried his military service with him, and every Veterans Day would always speak to the school children, about the significance of the war.

He married the love of his life Rose Marie Gaetano in 1948, a blessed union of 70 years. Mr. Circelli's life revolved around his family never missing one of his wife’s meals, and always attending his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren’s events. His stories will never be forgotten, from the bean fields and shacks to the streets of his beloved Utica, to the Military.

On behalf of TGGF and its members, we salute Mr. Circelli for his devotion and service to our great nation.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Circelli.jpg
#4459555 - 02/01/19 07:35 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: It is with great sadness we learned the news of Mr. Robert Anderson Sr, a top turret gunner on B-24 aircraft has gone before us. He was 93.

He was born in Chicago in 1925 and grew up in Harvey. His father died before he went to high school. While he was attending Thornton Township High School, he worked night jobs in factories because of the wartime manpower shortage.

Family members said Anderson was drafted soon after high school to join the Army Air Forces. He was a top turret gunner on B-24 aircraft with the Eighth Air Force based in Great Britain and flying bombing missions over Europe, his daughter said.

Anderson credited the GI Bill with making possible his education after high school and for his successful business career. He earned an undergraduate degree in science from DePaul University and then got an MBA from the University of Chicago.

On behalf of TGGF and its members, we salute you for your dedication and service to our freedom.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Anderson.jpg
#4459556 - 02/01/19 07:36 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: Saying ‘goodbye’ to a legend behind the chair. Hall of Fame barber and Marine from World War II Mr. Marty Buffano has passed away after battling cancer. He was 92.

In this fast-paced ever-changing world, a world that shows no signs of slowing down, there is one place on Midlothian Turnpike where you'll find consistency, serenity and a whole lot of style.

92-year-old Marty Bufano has been cutting hair since FDR lived in the White House. Marty learned the trade from an old barber in his hometown of Scranton in 1938.

“I was 13 years old when I became an apprentice,” says Marty. “I looked at him and said, ‘Angelo, What is an apprentice?’”

Then Uncle Sam beckoned at the outbreak of WWII.

“Then when I was 17 I joined the Marines. I wanted to be a Marine.” During the war Marty cut his fellow Marine’s hair in the South Pacific.

“Even then I was fussy about how I cut their hair. But It really didn’t matter but That is just me,” says Marty.

After the war Marty shaped quite a reputation in 1961 when he was named National Barber of the Year. To this day, Marty prefers the Roffler technique using a straight razor instead of scissors.

Customer Bill Lyle appreciates Marty’s attention to detail. “Next thing I know he grabs a razor and I thought ‘Wow. That is cool.”

Marty does not believe in a quick haircut. Bill who is a 30-year customer always allots an hour with Marty.

“It is kind of like visiting a friend and getting a haircut on the side,” says Marty.

Marty prefers the traditional looking cut unlike one particular world leader.

“You know I think has the goofiest haircut of all? This guy from North Korea. Oh God. He must think he looks cute with that haircut. It’s so bad.”

This former U.S. Marine is making up for lost time. This senior veteran decided he needed a new look. Marty got U.S. Marine tattoos on both arms. His tattoo obsession hasn’t stopped.

Marty is survived by his wife, four children, several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

"Every Day is Memorial Day
The Greatest Gnerations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Buffano.jpg
#4459559 - 02/01/19 07:41 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Thanks for posting these new entries F4U. Those men are certainly very special and inspiring.


“Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And if you gaze long enough into an abyss, the abyss will gaze back into you.”
#4459562 - 02/01/19 07:53 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Yes F4 thank you very moving stories..Made my eyes a bit damp..I'm not ashamed to admit to that..


Russ
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#4460986 - 02/12/19 11:06 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: Its with great sadness, we learn the news that Mr. David B. Evans, a World War II veteran of famous battle of Kasserine Pass has died. He was 98.

Evans enlisted in the Army on his 23 birthday — March 30, 1942. After attending basic training in Massachusetts, he joined the 9th Infantry Regiment at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

On Christmas Eve 1942, he arrived in North Africa at Casablanca. A few weeks later he found himself an escort for President Franklin D. Roosevelt as he headed to the Casablanca Conference, where he would announce that the Western Allies would accept nothing less than “unconditional surrender” from the Axis Powers.

Following the conference, Evans fought in the Tunisian Campaign from February to May of 1943, and actively participated in the disastrous battle at Kasserine Pass, where he was injured and sent to Italy to recover.

For most people, June 6, 1944, is D-Day, the beginning of the invasion of Normandy and the Western Allied effort to liberate mainland Europe from Nazi Germany.

For Evans, it was the day he found out he would be sent back to the U.S. after 18 months serving overseas in World War II. He spent the rest of his service in the South, serving, much to his dismay, in Brooklyn, Miss., not Brooklyn, N.Y. He was honorably discharged as a staff sergeant.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Evans.jpg
#4460999 - 02/12/19 11:36 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Whenever I think of Kasserine Pass I think of the movie "Patton". Sure, at the time the battle was as tactical victory for the Germans and it was played up in both the Allied and Axis press but in retrospect that battle had no bearing on the outcome of the war in Europe or even the campaign in North Africa.


“Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And if you gaze long enough into an abyss, the abyss will gaze back into you.”
#4461439 - 02/15/19 12:17 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS - It's with a heavy heart we announce the news that American Hero of World War II Mr. Alfonso Villa has died. He was 96.

Born and raised in Firestone, and joined the United States Army in 1943. Mr. Villa initially served with the 237th Combat Engineers Battalion and was in the 4th wave to hit Utah Beach on D-Day.

Mr. Villa made it through that day, but as the fighting moved inland, where he sustained wounds from a mortar receiving a head injury and quickly evacuated back to England.

After recovering in a hospital but still bandaged, he was returned to the front, serving this time with the 554th Engineers Heavy Pontoon Battalion finghting in the Battle of the Bulge and all the way to just outside Berlin when the war ended.

For his service in World War II, Mr. Villa received a Bronze Star and Purple Heart while serving his country in Normandy, Northern France; Rhineland; Ardennes-Alsace; Central Europe campaigns.

After the war, Mr. Villa worked for U.S. Mint, Postal Service and Union Pacific before capping it all off with a 25-year career with Western Paving. He has 11 children, 33 grandchildren, 37 great-grandchildren, and two great-great-grandchildren."

On behalf of TGGF and its members, we salute Mr. Alfonso Villa for his dedication and service to our freedom. RIP dear friend. We will never forget you.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Villa.jpg
#4461447 - 02/15/19 12:51 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Salute Mr. Alfonso Villa Thank you for your service


Russ
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#4461473 - 02/15/19 05:41 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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My father was RAF and although a conscript he gave top dollar. He died in 2003, I still miss him. Ground crew largely servicing B-24s bombing the Japanese in the old Dutch East Indies. How the world has changed. I was born in 1945, but I was 18 months old before he came home and saw me for the first time.


" if you don’t like the religious Right, wait until you meet the non-religious Right.."
#4463928 - 03/04/19 11:19 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Rear Admiral Edgar Keats, World War II veteran and oldest Naval Academy graduate, dies at 104

Retired Rear Admiral Edgar Keats, a decorated World War II veteran who served in the Pacific and was the Naval Academy’s oldest graduate, died of complications of a fall Saturday at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 104 and had lived in Guilford and Lutherville.

“He was an indomitable man. He was fearless and had the courtly manners of that era. He was such a gentleman,” said a daughter, Suzi Keats Cordish of Lutherville. “He was an unfailing optimist and often said, ‘Things are going to work out.’”

Born in Chicago, he was the son of Maxwell Keats, an advertising executive, and his wife, Clara, a homemaker who volunteered with charities. He was active in the Boy Scouts and achieved the rank of Eagle Scout at age 13. A Chicago Tribune article said he was the youngest Eagle in the area.

An Illinois congressman, Morton Hull, conducted an examination for candidates to the Naval Academy. Mr. Keats took the test, placed highest and at age 16 won his appointment to Annapolis. He entered the military academy in June 1931 as a member of the class of 1935. He won the Academy’s history prize awarded at his graduation.

Attached Files bs-1551559324-se2yc5ytzp-snap-image.jpg
#4463944 - 03/04/19 02:30 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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RIP sir


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#4463948 - 03/04/19 02:35 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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He won his appointment to Annapolis at age 16!

No doubt this man was special. RIP


“Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And if you gaze long enough into an abyss, the abyss will gaze back into you.”
#4464814 - 03/10/19 12:35 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS - Pearl Harbor survivor better known 'Uncle Al' died Sunday at the age of 99.

Al Rodrigues was one of the few remaining living veterans who survived the attack on Oahu more than 77 years ago.

He was posted at a station at Bishop Point on the mouth of Pearl Harbor — now a part of Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam — as a chief storekeeper.

He was on watch duty on the Sunday morning of the surprise attack and saw firsthand the USS Ward dropping depth charges on a Japanese mini-sub that had attempted to enter Pearl Harbor before the attack commenced. USS Ward is regarded as the first U.S. ship to fire a shot in the Pacific during World War II.

He went on to serve at multiple locations during the war and in 1943 was transferred to the battleship USS Washington. The ship was responsible for sinking the Japanese battleship Kirishima and seriously damaging the destroyer Ayanami.

Rodrigues had nine children, nine grandchildren and three great-grand children.

“Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest Generations Foundation

Attached Files Rodrigues.jpg
#4464862 - 03/10/19 06:52 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Jack Hinton , Typhoon pilot, gone to his eternal reward at 99. RIP sir.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calg...-vqvqNCXSpEu5Baa7LcYTnmAF0Vs6u5QYp_ORAtM


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#4465258 - 03/12/19 10:26 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS - Marie Kemper, an Army nurse who lived through the horrors of war in the South Pacific during World War II, was proud of her service and committed to equal rights for women.

“She made it clear that women were as strong and powerful and as capable as men,” recalled her son Dr. Craig Kemper of Austin, Texas. “All of us kids had that attitude. She passed it on to her children.”

Marie Kemper of Anoka, and formerly St. Anthony, died Jan. 26 at the age of 97. Born near Wessington, S.D., she grew up in the Depression era and graduated from St. Mary’s School of Nursing in Pierre, S.D.

“We were all poor,” recalled Marcella LeBeau, 99, of Eagle Butte, S.D., who became a good friend of Marie’s. “We were recovering from the Depression. We wore the same pair of white leather shoes through the three years of nursing training.”

As WWII accelerated, Kemper and LeBeau volunteered for the Army Nurse Corps, Kemper wrote in a self-published autobiography, “The Springtime of Life.”

Kemper became a second lieutenant and was stationed in New Guinea and the Philippines where the Army set up field hospitals near the front lines. When the field hospital in the Philippines was shelled by the Japanese, the nurses, including Kemper, would climb on top of the patients to shield them from the artillery, Craig Kemper said.

For her bravery, Marie Kemper was awarded the Bronze Star. She later told family and friends that because they were short on medical supplies, the nurses would walk down a row of beds, using the same needle to inject 10 patients with penicillin, cleaning the needle each time with alcohol.

“Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Kemper.jpg
#4465262 - 03/12/19 10:33 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS - World War II veteran involved in The Great Escape dies aged 101.

RAF pilot Jack Lyon captured by the Nazis and taken to a prisoner of war camp.

In 1941 Jack Lyon's bomber plane was struck by flak near Dusseldorf in Germany. All of the bomber's crew survived the crash-landing, only to be captured by the Nazis and taken to prisoner of war camps.

Mr Lyon, who was a flight lieutenant, ended up in the Stalag Luft III camp, where he was recruited by other prisoners to carry out surveillance of the compound ahead of the famed 1944 breakout which inspired the classic 1963 film The Great Escape, starring Steve McQueen.

The plot was uncovered by guards before Mr Lyon, who died on Friday, was able to make his escape.

In what is believed to be his last interview, which he did with the RAF Benevolent Fund in October ahead of the 75th anniversary of the Great Escape, he branded the mission "a success, but at great cost".

There was a "terrible aftermath" to the breakout because 50 prisoners were shot, he said.

Mr Lyon, who joined the air force aged 23, added: "We were allocated a position and told not to move until called. It was going to be a long night.

"After an hour or so of this, air raid sirens sounded and all the camp lights went out.

"We were left in total darkness until I heard a single shot.

"We guessed that probably meant the tunnel had been discovered so we did everything we could to destroy anything incriminating - there were maps, documents."

The odds of successfully breaking out of the camp were "slim", according to Mr Lyon.

He said: "In a mass breakout, with nationwide hue and cry and bad weather, I would say they were virtually nil.

"Well I suppose I was lucky."

Air Vice-Marshal David Murray, chief executive of the RAF Benevolent Fund, said: "Jack belonged to a generation of servicemen we are sadly losing as time goes on.

"His legacy and those of his brave comrades who planned and took part in the audacious Great Escape breakout are the freedoms we enjoy today.

"Their tenacity and determination spoke volumes about the values and bravery of the entire RAF, in helping to win the fight against the Nazis."

Mr Lyon, who lived in Bexhill-on-Sea in East Sussex, died shortly before the 75th anniversary of the breakout, which is on March 24.

“Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Lyon.jpg
#4467163 - 03/23/19 11:58 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS - Domingo Los Banos, a well-known Hawaii educator, World War II veteran and advocate for fellow Filipinos who fought in the war, died Friday morning at age 93, family said.

Born in Wahiawa, Los Banos was one of five brothers who served in the U.S. Army. He went to the University of Hawaii for a year before following his brother Alfred into the service.

Three of the Los Banos brothers served in World War II, one in Korea and another in Vietnam, said his son, Todd.

Domingo Los Banos, then 19, was sent to the Philippines with 300 other recruits from Hawaii as part of the 1st and 2nd Filipino Infantry Regiments.

He faced Japanese soldiers in jungle combat late in the war — at one point topping a hill and coming face to face with an enemy soldier. Los Banos shot first and lived.

Todd Los Banos said his father’s greatest purpose was to promote recognition of Filipino World War II service.

“My Dad was constant ‘go,’ and he had many projects that he’s done through his life,” the son said.

On March 9 he was at Waipahu Elementary School for its 120th anniversary, Todd Los Banos said. The same day, he met friends at the Waipahu Cultural Garden Park.

Serving in 1945 in the Philippines during mopping-up operations, Domingo Los Banos made a promise.

“I said, ‘God, get me out of harm’s way and I’ll become a teacher,’” he recalled in 2018. The bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki ended the war, “so I said, ‘Well, I better keep my commitment,’” he said.

Los Banos attended Springfield College in Massachusetts — where he sang with fellow student Don Ho. Todd Los Banos said his father was a Fulbright scholar and spent part of his time in Thailand coaching a Thai basketball team and interacting with the Thai royal family.

Springfield College’s logo included the words “spirit,” “mind” and “body” in a triangle.

“So that’s where I get my guidance about a good life — a balance between your spirit, your mind and your body,” Domingo Los Banos said in 2018.

He took his first teaching job at Waimea Elementary on Kauai, where the family had moved when he was a preteen. He became a principal and eventually a district superintendent in the Leeward area on Oahu.

More than 260,000 Filipino and Filipino-American soldiers responded to President Franklin Roosevelt’s call to duty and fought under the American flag during World War II, including more than 57,000 who died.

“Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Banos.jpg
#4467164 - 03/23/19 12:01 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Fort Worth’s last member of elite black Tuskegee Airmen dies at 96

Fort Worth’s last surviving member of the Tuskegee Airmen died Tuesday at the age of 96.

Robert T McDaniel was one of the elite black airmen who flew combat aircraft in World War II at a time when the military was segregated.

McDaniel, along with about 330 other surviving Tuskegee Airmen, were invited to Barack Obama’s inauguration in 2009. The group was also commemorated in the George Lucas movie “Red Tails” in 2012.

“He is the last of the Mohicans if you will,” said Sarah Walker, president of Tarrant County Black Historical and Genealogical Society.

Walker said McDaniel was one of her teachers at I.M. Terrell Elementary School.

McDaniel joined the war at a time when black men were not welcomed into service. At the first screening of “Red Tails,” McDaniel spoke at the reception about the squadron he served in 75 years ago.

“There were no blacks at all in the Air Corps. None. Didn’t want them there. They said, ‘They don’t have the dexterity to work these planes,’” he said at the screening in 2012.

McDaniel was valedictorian and president of his 1940 class at I.M. Terrell High School and was drafted in 1943. He was one of the 922 pilots trained in Tuskegee, Alabama, between 1941 and 1946.

“It created a sense of pride in the community,” Walker said. “It created a sense of a young man giving back, giving his life really, to all of America.”

In 2007 while Obama served Illinois in the U.S. Senate, he thanked the airmen when the group received the Congressional Gold Medal.

“My career in public service was made possible by the path heroes like the Tuskegee Airmen trail-blazed,” Obama said in a statement at the time, according to the New York Times.

However, Walker said McDaniel never bragged about his service and few people even knew he was a Tuskegee airman until the group’s story was shared in an exhibit at the Lenora Rolla Heritage Center Museum in 2013.

“They weren’t seeking pride. It was just a thing they knew they had to do,” Walker said about the airmen.

A wake will be held March 27 at Saint Peter Presbyterian in Fort Worth from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Funeral services, handled by Baker Funeral Home, will be on March 28 at 11 a.m. at Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church in Fort Worth.

As of September 2018, the Tuskegee Airmen society estimated 13 of the 355 single engine pilots who served in the Mediterranean theater operation during WWII were still alive.

Attached Files McDaniel.JPG
#4468345 - 03/31/19 10:17 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Canada's longest serving soldier dies, https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/cana...-soldier-dies/ar-BBVsdfH?ocid=spartandhp

MONTREAL - Honorary Col. David Lloyd Hart, a decorated Second World War veteran who was the Canadian Army's oldest and longest-serving officer, has died at age 101.
The Canadian Armed Forces announced that Hart died March 27 in Montreal.
Hart served for more than 80 years in the army in various roles, including as a young communications operator in England and France during the Second World War. A sergeant at the time, Hart went on to receive a military medal for bravery for his actions during the ill-fated Allied raid on Dieppe in 1942, when he insisted on briefly going off-air to locate two brigades and pass on an order to withdraw.
Born in July 1917 in Montreal, Hart enlisted in the reserves in 1937 with the Fourth Signal Regiment and was called to active duty in 1939.


There was only 16 squadrons of RAF fighters that used 100 octane during the BoB.
The Fw190A could not fly with the outer cannon removed.
There was no Fw190A-8s flying with the JGs in 1945.
#4468425 - 04/01/19 01:35 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Wow, an 80 year career in the army! That's mind blowing.


“Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And if you gaze long enough into an abyss, the abyss will gaze back into you.”
#4470083 - 04/12/19 02:24 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: One of the last Army Rangers involved in the D-Day Invasion at Normandy has died.

Relatives say Charles Ryan died Sunday in his St. Louis home. He was 96.

Mr. Charles Ryan was a standout youth athlete who qualified for the 1940 Winter Olympics in speed skating. Those Olympics were canceled due to World War II.

On June 6, 1944 at Normandy, he was among 225 Rangers who helped neutralize enemy artillery that was attacking landing allied troops. Fifty of 65 men in his company were killed. Mr. Ryan was wounded but recovered and later fought in the Battle of the Bulge.

After the war, Mr. Ryan founded several aerospace engineering companies.

Mr. Ryan is survived by his wife of 68 years, Joan, six children, nine grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Ryan.jpg
#4470084 - 04/12/19 02:25 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: Its with great sadness that we learn the news that one of the last surviving member of the Tuskegee Airmen, Robert T. McDaniel has died at the age of 96.

Mr. Robert T. McDaniel was a member of the Tuskegee Airmen, the elite African-American pilots who flew during World War II. He was drafted into the U.S. Army in 1943 and trained as a pilot and bombardier at the Tuskegee Institute, going on to serve as a flight officer with the 477th bombardier group.

After the war, Mr. McDaniel became a math teacher, later serving as a school counselor, vice principal, and principal.

As of March 2019, the Tuskegee Airmen Organization estimated 7 of the 355 single engine pilots who served in the Mediterranean theater operation during World War II were still alive.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files McDaniel.jpg
#4470085 - 04/12/19 02:27 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS - It’s with great sadness we learn that Normandy “D-DAY” veteran Mr. Barran Eugene Tucker, has died. He was 94.

Born on October 30, 1924 to Estelle and Alvin Tucker in Spiro, Oklahoma. He was drafted into the Army during his senior year of high school at Spiro.

He served in the 29th Division, 175th , Company G and landed on the unsecured Omaha Beach on the morning of June 07.

After the 175th Infantry Regiment pushed inland, the soldiers liberated Isigny. Next, they pushed on to Saint-Lô and the regiment attacked a bridge along the Vire River on June 13. But the Americans were outnumbered by the Germans.

“They weren’t about to give it up,” said Tucker.

“We never did capture it. We assaulted it three times and they wiped us out. There was a lot more enemy and artillery up there than they estimated. How I survived, I don’t know. I was in the thick of it. I came within inches of getting killed there. But they missed me.”

After running out of ammunition and suffering severe casualties, Col. Paul Goode, commanding officer of the 175th Infantry Regiment, made the decision to surrender to the 17th SS Panzergrenadier Division.

“Our regimental commander had so many wounded, he surrendered to save lives,” said Tucker.

“We fought all day long, so we ran out of ammunition and we had so many wounded.”

The Germans took the captured soldiers to a POW camp in Mooseport, Germany and were forced to work as slave labor in a sugar beet factory. In December 1944, Tucker escaped back into France with two other soldiers.

A French family fed the soldiers and told them they could sleep in their barn. However, the family notified the SS and Tucker was captured that night. The Germans took Tucker to a POW camp in Zeitz, Germany.

In April 1945, a rumor spread around the camp that Adolf Hitler had ordered the execution of all American POWs. So Tucker escaped and was rescued by American soldiers. When he made it home to the U.S., he weighed only 77 pounds.

Mr. Tyler was the last known survivor of company G.

“Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Tucker.jpg
#4470424 - 04/14/19 04:36 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS - It’s with sadness we learn the news that World War II veteran Edgar Kuhlow of Sheboygan Falls has died. He was 100.

Over the years, the Sheboygan Falls resident shared stories of his time in the war and as a prisoner of war in Germany for over seven months.

Kuhlow was drafted at age 24 and served in the 45th Infantry, fighting in the front lines of battle, including at the January 1944 Battle of Anzio in Italy.

Months after that invasion, on Sept. 28, 1944, Kuhlow and a squad of six men were sent out on reconnaissance when the group was captured in France, about 100 miles from the German border.

"They lined us up on the road," Kuhlow said. "I thought for sure they're going to shoot us."

In the months that followed, Kuhlow and other prisoners were marched from camp to camp throughout Germany, each one no better than the last with little food, chilling temperatures and either bunks full of lice and fleas or the cold, hard ground with only one small blanket to share among three soldiers.

"I was never beaten or anything like that, but conditions were so poor," Kuhlow said. "The food — we never got enough to eat. I'm only about 140 pounds to start with and ... I lost 50 pounds."

Kuhlow's liberation came with the end of the war. In mid-February 1945, with the Russians' "big guns in the east" audible, the Germans forced Kuhlow and other POWs to march west, following the Baltic Sea coastline to avoid capture. Kuhlow estimates they covered some 200 miles in a three-week period.

Kuhlow, who had malaria and was too weak to walk, traveled in a wagon. He and others who were sick were eventually dumped at a camp at Greifswald, where they stayed for two months.

At the end of April, he and the others again were forced to march away from the approaching Russians to Barth, near the Baltic Sea. This time, it was only a two-day trial, however, and the group arrived in the German town at the beginning of May 1945, days away from the end of the war.

The morning after they arrived in Barth, Kuhlow recalls he was astonished to find all of the German guards had pulled out during the night and headed west to surrender to the Americans.

Although free from German watch, the group stayed there for another week or so, until an English B17 bomber picked them up at a nearby air field.

"It was the 12 of May," Kuhlow said. "It was a beautiful evening."

A day later, the group arrived in Reims, France, and Kuhlow, who was battling yet another bout of malaria, was treated at a hospital there.

The first thing the former prisoners of war did was shed all of their clothes, which were rags at that point, Kuhlow said. That was followed by a hot shower, a haircut, shave, another shower and then a noontime meal.

"Then, I felt like an American again," Kuhlow said.

“Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest Generations Foundation

Attached Files Kuhlow.jpg
#4470425 - 04/14/19 04:37 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS - Its with sadness we receive the news the World War II pilot, Darrel Shumard has died. He was 97.

Fully 74 years after his fighter-bomber tumbled from the sky over war-plagued Europe and he was seized by German soldiers, Darrel Shumard just four weeks ago took off from Sonoma County’s airport in a Cessna with a pilot a generation younger beside him.

At age 97, the taciturn and modest Shumard, long one of the region’s most revered veterans of World War II, took the controls of the sporty, six-seat plane and headed off for Amador County.

“He flew the thing all the way over and all the way back,” marveled his pal, Lynn Hunt, a pilot and restorer of the sorts of warplanes that Shumard flew as a young U.S. Army Corps captain.

Shumard was born Dec. 2, 1921, in Galesburg, Illinois. He wasn’t yet school-aged when hard times pushed his parents to California in search of work.

When he was 10 and 11 years old and the Great Depression was on, Shumard and his folks became “fruit tramps,” granddaughter Michelle Grady of Rohnert Park recalls. They moved from orchard to orchard in the Monterey-Salinas area, picking produce.

Shumard graduated from high school in Turlock. He had studied at Modesto Junior College for a year and worked briefly at Lockheed Aircraft Co.’s factory in Burbank when, not long after the Japanese Imperial Navy attacked Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, he went to war.

He trained to fly the Curtiss P-40 Warhawk fighter, then the P-47. He flew missions against Germany in the Battle of the Bulge, Hitler’s attempt to disrupt the Allies’ advance that began with the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France.

Early in 1945, 23-year-old 1st Lt. Shumard was flying out of France with the 404th Fighter Squadron, 371st Fighter Group, 9th Air Force. On Valentine’s Day, while flying in formation on his second mission of the day, the wings of his plane and a second one accidentally touched.

Damaged, both planes went out of control and both pilots bailed out, descending beneath parachutes near the French-German border.

Shumard always considered himself lucky, but that day his boots touched down in the midst of German soldiers while the second pilot came down among Americans.

Shumard was imprisoned at a POW camp. As the Allies approached, the prisoners were forced to march many miles to a second camp.

Close friend and fellow pilot Bill Canavan recalled Shumard telling how he was walking the camp’s perimeter fence one day, just for something to do, and he came upon a familiar face — that of a former Turlock neighbor and high-school buddy.

Shumard learned the man, Art Peterson, had become a pilot of a Martin B-26 Marauder bomber. “They couldn’t believe they found each other,” Canavan said.

Shumard and his fellow POWs were liberated April 29, just days before Germany’s surrender. Shumard was back in California and an honorably discharged veteran when the war ended with Japan’s surrender on Aug. 15.

Again a civilian, he went to work for a Southern California construction firm that paved streets and parking lots and such. In 1953, he fell in love with Madeline Hood, a descendant of Roger Williams, founder of the Rhode Island colony.

“Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Shumard.jpg
#4470664 - 04/16/19 10:10 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS - Normandy Veteran of the battle La Fiere dies. Mr. Fred B. Morgan Jr. of Martha’s Vineyard, was 97.

Mr. Morgan Jr. didn’t talk about World War II for over 50 years, and when he did, no story was quite as harrowing as his memory of treating a badly wounded soldier along a road in Normandy, France, while a Nazi tank approached during the small hamlet Battle at La Fiere.

“He kept saying ‘Get outta here Morgan, they’re gonna kill us,’ ”

As the tank bore down on them, Mr. Morgan didn’t budge: “No way I could have ever lived with myself if I left him in a ditch bleeding.”

Morgan was a member of the 82nd Airborne’s 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, and a veteran of combat jumps in Sicily, Holland, the Battle of the Bulge, and Normandy.

For his own war injuries, he received a Purple Heart and was awarded a Bronze Star as well.

The oldest of three siblings, Fred Baxter Morgan Jr. was born in Edgartown in 1921, a son of Fred B. Morgan Sr., who skippered vessels, and Doris Howland Taylor.

Mr. Morgan, known as Ted, who became an Edgartown selectman for more than 30 years, was 97 when he died on Martha’s Vineyard Hospital.

“Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files morgan.jpg
#4470986 - 04/18/19 10:21 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS - Its with great sadness, we have been informed that Normandy World War II veteran Mr. Eddie Price, known for his patriotism and devotion to veteran causes has died. He was 94.

Many veterans knew him as the man who drove them to the Veterans Affairs hospital in Durham.

His wife, Evelyn, knew him as a man who helped everybody. She said Sunday that she will remember him “for the love he showed me and his fellow man.”

A Lucama native, Price was drafted into the U.S. Army during World War II. He completed basic training in 1943 and was sent to England in April 1944 as a rifleman with the 29th Infantry Division. He was part of Operation Overlord at Normandy.

Price told The Wilson Times in 2000 that he spent that first night in France in a foxhole and watched German and American planes overhead and listened to the sound of artillery fire.

After serving in combat, Price spent a year as a military police officer in England, France and Belgium. He never advanced beyond private first class — “that’s as high a rank as I got because I was drafted for that one job,”

Over the years, Price served as chairman of the Wilson Committee on Patriotism and was an active member of the DAV as well as American Legion Post 13 and Veterans of Foreign Wars.

The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
“Where Every Day is Memorial Day”

Attached Files Price.jpg
#4471148 - 04/19/19 12:47 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS - World War II Marine whose book about grueling jungle combat during WWII became a basis for the HBO miniseries "The Pacific" has died at his home in Texas.

Burgin was born to Joseph Harmon Burgin and Beulah May Burgin in Jewett, Texas.

Mr. Burgin joined the United States Marine Corps on November 13, 1942, during World War II and was assigned to the 9th Replacement Battalion. He soon became a mortarman in K-Company, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division, and fought in the Pacific War at Cape Gloucester, then alongside his friend, Eugene Sledge, on Peleliu, and Okinawa where he was promoted to the rank of sergeant upon reaching Okinawa.

Burgin was the author of the memoir Islands of the Damned: A Marine at War in the Pacific (with William Marvel). He was awarded a Bronze Star for his actions in the Battle of Okinawa on 2 May 1945, when he destroyed a Japanese machine gun emplacement that had his company pinned down.

After the war, he went to work for the United States Post Office. While in Melbourne, Burgin met an Australian woman, named Florence Risely. They married in Dallas on January 29, 1947. The couple had four daughters. Burgin is portrayed in the HBO miniseries The Pacific by Martin McCann. Burgin himself appears in documentary footage during the miniseries.

On behalf of TGGF and its members, we salute Mr. Burgin for his dedication and service to our freedom.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Website: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Burgin.jpg
#4471152 - 04/19/19 01:11 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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So sad to see the Heroes passing ..SALUTE !!


Russ
Semper Fi
#4471181 - 04/19/19 03:16 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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RIP to the fallen heroes.


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#4471917 - 04/26/19 02:43 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS - It’s with great sadness to learn the news that Pearl Harbor survivor Ray Garland has died. He was 96.

Garland enlisted in the Marines at 19, and was on the deck of the USS Tennessee when the attack on Pearl Harbor started.

The Coeur d’Alene resident was the last Pearl Harbor survivor living in the Inland Northwest region.

Garland returned to Pearl Harbor for the first time to attend the 73rd Anniversary with The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation.

Garland went on to fight in same of the famous battles in the Pacific.

The Marines then recalled Garland in 1950 when the Korean War broke out, and he was injured in a firefight.

He will be greatly missed by so many, but his legacy will continue on for many generations to come. RIP

“Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Garland.jpg
#4472047 - 04/27/19 12:26 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Another to add, with respect, Bob Graham age 97. RIP

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/h...t-living-relatives/ar-BBWkaxe?li=BBnb7Kz

#4473913 - 05/13/19 01:13 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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WE REMEMBER - World War II veteran Donald Brancaccio a true HERO will be missed. Brancaccio was 93.

Donald Brancaccio was a true Windsor boy. He was born and raised in Windsor. He was called up in 1944 – Canada had overseas conscription near the end of the war – and became an infantry private in the Essex Scottish Regiment.

The local Essex Scottish participated two years earlier in the 1942 Dieppe Raid with heavy casualties. In 1954, The Essex Scottish and The Kent Regiment, which did not serve overseas during the Second World War, were amalgamated to form The Essex and Kent Scottish.

He and hundreds of other soldiers left Halifax to head overseas and as the transport ship approached Britain, the ship got word the German U-boats were after them, his son said. The ship was rerouted to Glasgow, Scotland in an alarming welcome to the war.

Mr. Brancaccio had more training in Britain before heading to Antwerp, Belgium. He never got to the front lines but served in the field of battle in Belgium and Holland, his son said. At the end of the war he was repositioned to Hamburg, Germany to help transport military equipment back to Allied bases.

He died Monday about a week away from his 94th birthday on May 1.

As his family went through hundreds of photographs Tuesday, it was evident in the pictures of baptisms and graduations how much he loved his large family. He had a big heart, a strong work effort and was super polite, his son said. “Thank you kindly. That was one of his favourite sayings.”

“He was always proud to be, number one, a Windsor resident and number two, a Canadian.”

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Brancaccio.jpg
#4473914 - 05/13/19 01:14 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: World War II Veteran Gino Marchetti, Baltimore Colts legend and Pro Football Hall of Famer, dies at 93.

Marchetti was born in Smithers, West Virginia, the son of Italian immigrants Ernesto and Maria. He enlisted in the U.S. Army after graduating high school in Antioch, California, and fought in the Battle of the Bulge as a machine gunner during World War II.

Upon returning home to California after the war, he attended Modesto Junior College for a year before joining the football program at the University of San Francisco, where his team enjoyed an undefeated season in 1951.

He was selected in the second round of the 1952 NFL draft (14th overall) by the New York Yanks. In 2004, Marchetti was voted to the East-West Shrine Game Hall of Fame.

"Where Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Marchetti.jpg
#4473915 - 05/13/19 01:15 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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WE REMEMBER - Bernard Dargols, only French Soldier to fight at Omaha Beach in World War II, dies at 98.

Former soldier, whose family has Jewish origins, left France in 1938 for an internship in the United States and enlisted after seeing France’s Vichy leader shake hands with Adolf Hitler.

Bernard Dargols, the only French soldier to fight in an American uniform as Allied forces stormed the coast of Normandy at Omaha Beach in a battle heralding the end of World War II, has died aged 98, the Caen Memorial war museum said Tuesday.

“We are deeply saddened by Bernard’s passing… surrounded by his loved ones, a few days from his 99th birthday. We will miss him terribly,” the museum said on Twitter.

His death comes just a few weeks before France is hosting ceremonies to mark the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings, which are to be attended by US President Donald Trump.

Dargols had left France in 1938 for an internship in the United States, and after seeing France’s Vichy leader Philippe Petain shake hands with Adolf Hitler, he enlisted in the US Army, later obtaining joint French-American citizenship.

He was just 24 when he crossed the Channel from England to France on June 8, 1944, two days after Operation Overlord was launched to help wrest back France from Germany.

“Some GIs were killed in the water. By what miracle was I going to make these last few meters” to the beach, he recalled in a 2012 memoir written with a grand-daughter.

“If the Liberty Ship had been able to quickly go into reverse, I think I would have asked them to do it,” he said.

A jeep named Bastille

A few hours later, aboard a jeep nicknamed “La Bastille,” he found himself surrounded by his fellow Frenchmen who couldn’t believe their ears.

“What a feeling to hear French spoken, to be taken in the arms of all these people older than me, calling me their liberator,” he recalled.

“If I had kept all the bottles of calvados brandy they were giving me, I think I could have opened my own specialist shop!”

Dargols, whose family had Jewish origins, had an aunt and uncle who were deported to the Nazi death camps where they died, though his mother managed to remain in Paris during France’s occupation.

After the war he took over his father’s sewing machine shop, but he often spoke about the bloodshed he witnessed, giving interviews to ensure younger generations never forgot the high price paid.

“Today we’re seeing the signs of anti-Semitism,” he told AFP in a 2014 interview.

“I want young people to fight back against it.”

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Dargols.jpg
#4473916 - 05/13/19 01:15 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS - Jim Coley, World War II and Merchant Marine veteran, dies at 96.

A native of Meadville, Mississippi, Coley served on three U.S. Merchant Marine ships during WWII, including one of the first allowed into Manila Harbor in 1945 during the fight to recapture the city. Coley served in his ships’ galleys, working his way up from waiting tables to chief cook.

A fleet of civilian-owned vessels that became a Navy auxiliary during the war, the Merchant Marine played a critical role, carrying troops, supplies and equipment around the globe. Its ships were often targeted because of their vital cargo, and the Merchant Marine suffered a greater percentage of war-related deaths than any other U.S. service.

Coley and other merchant mariners had to wait a long time to be recognized as veterans. They were finally granted that status in 1988, thanks to a federal court ruling.

After the war, Coley returned to Louisiana and worked for oil drilling operations, including 21 years off-shore for Chevron.

In 1969, he survived Hurricane Camille, losing everything “except the clothes I had on.” Camille still ranks among the most devastating storms in recorded history.

Coley moved to the Tulsa area in 1981, working as a state field superintendent for Sterling Oil Co.

Survivors include his wife, Ella Jane Coley; daughters, Crystal Theriot, Marcy Dowler and Myra Wood; and 14 grandchildren.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Coley.jpg
#4473918 - 05/13/19 01:16 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS - World War II veteran, POW William Connell dies at 95.

William "Bill" Connell's first bombing mission in 1944 would also be his last. Shot down over an island in the Pacific Ocean, he would endure over a year in Japanese prison camps.

Connell was liberated at the end of World War II and lived a long life as a husband, father, naval officer and insurance salesman. A longtime resident of Edina and Bloomington, he died on April 25 at age 95.

William Laughlin Connell grew up in Seattle and enlisted in the Navy soon after graduating from high school in 1942. He trained stateside as a naval aviator for nearly two years before joining a divebombing squadron on an aircraft carrier.

At the controls of a Curtiss SB2C Helldiver, Connell took off from the USS Hornet before dawn on July 4, aiming to destroy a radio transmitter on the Japanese island of Chichijima, about 600 miles south of Tokyo. He and his rear gunner came under heavy fire, a shell exploding close to their aircraft.

"It blew the plane right in half, so that me and the front end of the airplane went one direction, and my rear seat man and the tail went a different direction," Connell said in a 2004 interview

The gunner was never heard from again. Connell managed to deploy his parachute, descending into Chichijima's harbor while accosted by tracer bullets. He was taken ashore and then hung from a tree by his arms – tied behind his back – for 12 hours.

For many months, Connell would be interrogated and beaten occasionally and would sleep on a board. When the war ended in August 1945, Connell was down to 110 pounds – 55 pounds less than when he'd been shot down – and his lower legs were swollen from beriberi because of a nutritional deficiency.

Back in Seattle with the Navy after the war, Connell met Mary Jane Bolstad, a Minneapolis native. They married and moved to the Twin Cities in the late 1950s when he took a post at the Naval Air Station in Minneapolis. Connell retired from the Navy in 1964 as a lieutenant commander.

He then started a career as an insurance salesman, working for State Farm in Bloomington for 23 years. Even after retiring from that job, Connell worked part-time until the mid-1990s in the pro shop at the Minnesota Valley Country Club in Bloomington.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation

Attached Files Connell.jpg
#4473919 - 05/13/19 01:16 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS - The Navajo Nation has announced that World War II Navajo Code Talker, Fleming Begaye Sr. died Friday in Chinle, Arizona. He was 97.

He was born in Red Valley, a small, unincorporated community in Apache County roughly one mile west of the New Mexico border in 1921.

Begaye was among hundreds of Navajos who served in the Marine Corps, using a code based on their native language to outsmart the Japanese.

According to the Navajo Nation, Begaye served as a Code Talker from 1943 to 1945 and fought in the Battle of Tarawa and the Batter of Tinian. He spent a year in a naval hospital after being wounded.

Aftre the war, Mr. Begaye later ran a general store in Chinle.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest Generations Foundation

Attached Files Begaye.jpg
#4473937 - 05/13/19 04:07 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS - 101st Airborne Paratrooper Ralph K. Manley, who parachuted into Normandy during D-Day in World War II died Monday afternoon at the age of 95.

Whenever Ralph Manley was around, there was always laughter, fun, and his trademark jump for joy as he never lost that spring in his step even as he reached the age of 95.

In the early part of this century Manley returned to France with his fellow World War II soldiers as they paid an emotional visit to the Beaches of Normandy where Manley was a member of the 101st Airborne Division on D-Day, jumping out of a burning plane just before it crashed.

Manley survived while 13 of his buddies died. He would go on to fight in the Battle of the Bulge while his twin brother Roland was killed during the war from friendly fire over the Mediterranean Sea.

Manley spent the rest of his life passing along his passion for living to others.

Manley returned to Normandy in 2005, and and again in 2007 with The Greatest Generations Foundation. He will be missed by so many.

“Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web:www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Manley.jpg
#4474445 - 05/17/19 10:14 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS - World War II veteran Bob Maxwell, the nation’s oldest Medal of Honor recipient, has died in Oregon more than seven decades after grabbing a blanket and throwing himself on a German hand grenade in France to save his squad mates. He was 98.

Born on Oct. 26, 1920, in Boise, Idaho, Maxwell was drafted into the U.S. Army during World War II. Though he was a Quaker, he declined conscientious objector status and entered the service in Colorado.

Maxwell earned the nation's highest military honor while fighting in Besancon, France, on Sept. 7, 1944, the newspaper reported. The bomb severely injured him, but the blanket saved his life by absorbing some of the impact.

He was also awarded two Silver Stars, two Purple Hearts, a Bronze Star and two French combat awards — the French Croix de Guerre and the Legion d'Honneur — for his service in World War II.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF. org

Attached Files Maxwell.jpg
#4474446 - 05/17/19 10:14 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS – Its with great sadness, we learn the news that World War II Hero Mr. Van K. Mefford has died. He was 94.

He was among the Greatest Generation, serving in the “Stalwart and Strong” 87th Acorn Infantry Division of General George Patton’s 3rd Army, during World War II.

When he enlisted at the age of 19, he promised that the sacrifices he made would never be in vain. Whenever in his presence, you knew you were surrounded by integrity and strength. It wasn’t until later in his life that he was willing to share the experiences that made him this way.

Van and his unit, the 345th Infantry Brigade, were involved in combat operations throughout Europe, precisely the costliest action the US fought, the Battle of the Bulge. Van was wounded while crossing the Rhine River on March 24, 1945. According to Van’s account, “We were caught in the crossfire for over five hours; an officer and an enlisted man were killed.

I was one of six wounded.” Van received the Purple Heart for his valor. He also received the Bronze Star, a Combat Infantry Badge, the European Theatre Medal Badge, the Army of Occupation (Germany) medal, World War II Victory Medal, Marksman Medals in Machine Gun, Rifle, and Pistol as well as the US Army Good Conduct Medal.

After returning from the war, Van enrolled at the University of Illinois via the GI Bill. He earned a degree in Mechanical Engineering and retired from Borg-Warner 30 years later. Van enjoyed retirement by continuously traveling and volunteering for others. Van had a passion for motorcycles and was active through various motorcycle organizations, including the American Motorcycle Association and the Antique Motorcycle Club of America.

Thankfully, Van was an avid writer and records keeper. His letters and notes are preserved and stand as witness to atrocities of war and the Holocaust. He listed the names of every one of his buddies he lost and truly dedicated all his good deeds in life to them.

He often would say, “Who gave their lives so that we may live.” In 2000 Van also recorded himself sharing his entire World War II story on tape. He leaves behind a loving family of 6 children, 16 grandchildren, and 14 great-grandchildren. Van is buried at the Rock Island National Cemetery.

The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
“Where Every Day is Memorial Day”
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Mefford.jpg
#4474562 - 05/18/19 12:32 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS - Stanley Hwalek, believed to be the last survivor of the attack on Pearl Harbor in the Rochester area, died earlier this month at age 99, 77 years after his brush with death on the deck of the USS Nevada.

Hwalek was born in 1920 and enlisted in the Navy in September 1938 after graduating from Benjamin Franklin High School. Three years later he had what must have seemed like a plum assignment as a coxswain on a ship stationed in Hawaii.

For the rest of his life, Hwalek would recount the story of Dec. 7, 1941: he was on deck reading a newspaper after breakfast when he noticed smoke coming from nearby Ford Island.

At first, he thought it was a training exercise. Then the call went out for all hands to battle stations. He tucked into a small turret on the ship's starboard side and listened, shocked, in the darkness, as the Japanese war planes blasted away.

He remained in the Navy through the end of the war, escorting convoys and seeking out German submarines in the Atlantic Ocean on the USS Card before returning home in 1945 to the Polish community in northeast Rochester where he'd grown up. He married Gertrude Wroblewska in 1948 and went to work for DuPont for 36 years before retiring in 1982.

“Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest Generations Foundation

Attached Files Hwalek.jpg
#4476001 - 05/29/19 10:20 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: It is with great sadness, we learn the news that Melvin "Bud" Kennedy, Nebraska's last Pearl Harbor survivor has died. He was 95.

The 95-year-old was a native of Cedar Rapids, Nebraska and spent much of his life in Grand Island. He joined the Navy at 17 and was at Pearl Harbor when the Japanese attacked in 1941. Kennedy described the attack as the worst day of his life. He told Local4 last December that he spent much of that day helping pull fellow sailors from water encased in oil.

Bud was discharged in 1947, returning to Nebraska to work as a farmer, gas station owner and quality control inspector at New Holland. He was employed as a mechanic for Carl Anderson in Grand Island until his retirement in 1988.

On behalf of TGGF and its members, we salute Melvin "Bud" Kennedy for his dedication and service to our freedom. You will never be forgotten.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Kennedy.jpg
#4476373 - 06/02/19 12:49 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS - BAND OF BROTHERS ALBERT MAMPRE DIES AT 97

It is with great sadness that we learn the news of Staff Sergeant Albert Mampre (born May 5, 1922) was a non-commissioned officer with Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, in the 101st Airborne Division of the United States Army during World War II has died. He was 97.

Going down in the sun, we will remember them.

“Everyday is Memorial Day”
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

https://www.nratv.com/videos/albert-mapre-the-band-of-brothers

Attached Files Mampre.jpg
#4479710 - 06/24/19 10:24 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Charles C. "Buck" Pattillo (1924-2019) Charles C. Pattillo, Lt. Gen. USAF (ret), known to all as "Buck", passed away on May 20, 2019, at his home with his loving wife of 66 years by his side, in Spotsylvania, Virginia. He was 94. He was well known in the aviation community for his good humor, as an avid historian and as a pioneer in jet aerobatic demonstration teams. He is a highly decorated United States Air Force combat fighter pilot. He and his identical twin brother, Cuthbert A. (Bill), were born on June 3, 1924, the youngest of six siblings, to Joseph W. and Pearl (Stubbs) Pattillo in Atlanta, Georgia. In 1942 the twins enlisted in the Army Air Corps and served together in the 352nd Fighter Group in the European Theater, flying fighter escort for B-17 bombing raids over Germany. Buck and Bill led parallel careers in the Air Force for over 35 years and were often stationed together at the same base or in the same region. The Pattillo twins were founding members of the impromptu "Skyblazers" aerobatic team from 1949 to 1952, which gained official recognition and toured post-war Europe to demonstrate the capabilities of newly developed fighter jets. In 1953 and 1954, they flew left and right wing positions in the first USAF "Thunderbird" precision flying team. In the course of his career, he had the privilege of flying many aircraft, including the P-40, P-47, F-80, F-84, F-86, T-33, F-100 and F-4 Phantom. He was a combat veteran with 37 combat missions in the P-51 during World War II and 120 combat missions in the F-4 in South East Asia. His favorite aircraft was the plane he flew in World War II: the iconic P-51 Mustang that was named and inscribed "Little Rebel." He earned a bachelor's degree in mathematics from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1962, attended the Army War College in 1965 and received a master's degree in international affairs from George Washington University. A command pilot with more than 5,500 flying hours, his military decorations include the Distinguished Service Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, Legion of Merit (thrice), Distinguished Flying Cross (with Oak Leaf Cluster), Air Medal with 10 Oak Leaf Clusters and the French Croix De Guerre with Palm. He and Bill were inducted into the Georgia Aviation Hall of Fame in 2000. Buck married his beautiful, loving wife (also a pilot), Bobbie Brown in 1952. Married for 66 years, they raised four children. He is survived by his wife, Bobbie of Spotsylvania Virginia, his children Deborah A. Jones, Cheri L. Robertson, Jon S. Pattillo (wife Elaine), Charles 'Chuck' Pattillo, Jr., and 10 grandchildren. As part of the "Greatest Generation", his love for family and Country along with his good witted humor will be dearly missed. His life stands as an inspiration to those who knew him and to those who learn from his legacy. A memorial service will be held on June 29, 2019 at 12:00 PM at Wilderness Community Church in Spotsylvania, VA. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to a favorite charity. Inurnment will be at Arlington National Cemetery at a later date.

https://www.fredericksburg.com/obit...41306d4-faf5-5d2b-8599-2fd1e641e1e1.html



Attached Files 5d0edd2e80467.image.jpg
#4479722 - 06/24/19 12:32 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Retired US Air Force Lt. Col. Robert Friend, one of the last surviving members of the legendary Tuskegee Airmen during World War II, has died, his daughter said. He was 99.

Friend's daughter told CNN affiliate KCBS her father was surrounded by friends and family when he died Friday in California. The cause of death was sepsis, Karen Crumlich, Friend's daughter, said.

"...We called the chaplain and we did a prayer," Crumlich said. "And during the prayer, right when we said amen, he took his last breath."

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.cn...end-tuskegee-airmen-obit-trnd/index.html

Attached Files robert-friend.jpg
#4479723 - 06/24/19 12:35 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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RIP

This thread has been a very sobering read.


“Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And if you gaze long enough into an abyss, the abyss will gaze back into you.”
#4479729 - 06/24/19 01:37 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: PanzerMeyer]  
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Originally Posted by PanzerMeyer
RIP

This thread has been a very sobering read.


And it contains only a small fraction of the 400 or so WWII veterans we loose every day in just the US.

#4483484 - 07/20/19 03:29 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS -- It is with great sadness, we have learned that WWII Veteran George Haines, one of Rochester's most visible and vocal World War II veterans, has died. He was 94.

Haines, who lived in Greece, was among the veterans of Rochester's that have been involved with The Greatest Generations Foundation programs in recent years.

He served in the U.S. Army 24th Division in the Pacific and saw two years of combat. His story was recorded and now sits in the Library of Congress.

"I saw a lot, and we just...it's something you don't tell spread out, but it's in your mind all your life," Haines said.

Known for his ability to live vivaciously and always have many irons in the fire, his service to our country and creation of cross-stitched flags that he gave away.

Family members said fellow WWII veteran and TGGF Ambassador Pete DuPre was at Haines' bedside Wednesday night, playing hymns on his harmonica as his friend passed away.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web. www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Haines.jpg
#4483485 - 07/20/19 03:29 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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LIFE REMEMBERED: William Tully Brown, one of the last Navajo Code Talkers, dies at 96, leaving only five living Navajo Code Talkers.

Brown was born in Black Mountain, Ariz., on the Navajo Nation and enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1944. He served at the battles of Iwo Jima and Guadalcanal, and received several commendations including the American Campaign and World War Two Victory medals. He was honorably discharged two years later.

The Code Talkers used their native language to create an unbreakable code that stumped the Japanese and helped turn the tide in the Pacific during World War II.

Brown is the third Navajo Code Talker to die in the past month following New Mexico State Sen. Jonn Pinto.

”Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Brown.jpg
#4483486 - 07/20/19 03:30 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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LIFE REMEMBERED: ROY M.HANNA, JR., World War II veteran, Member of the famed 82nd Airborne Division has passed away. Mr. Hanna was 102.

Raised on a dairy farm in central Pennsylvania, Mr. Hanna attended Penn State University where he was a member of Sigma Chi and the Penn State Boxing Team, winning the Intercollegiate Golden Glove championship in the Light Weight Division in 1939. In 1940 he volunteered for military service.

During World War II, First Lt. Roy Hanna was a platoon leader in the 3rd Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry, 82nd Airborne Infantry Division. In addition to the Distinguished Service Cross, Hanna went on to receive 10 other citations for his service in the Second World War. After leaving the Army, Hanna had a successful career in the dairy industry. A Pennsylvania native and centenarian, Hanna’s called Pinehurst home now for 36 years.

In 2009, Mr. Hanna made the return back to Holland for the 65th Anniversary of Operation Market Garden with The Greatest Generations Foundation. Hie will be remembered by so many. RIP Mr. Hanna.

The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
“Where Every Day is Memorial Day”

Attached Files HANNA.jpg
#4483487 - 07/20/19 03:30 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: World War II veteran Mr. Joseph Iscovitz, one of few remaining Pearl Harbor survivors has died. He was 103.

On the morning of December 07, 1941, Joseph Iscovitz picked up a machine gun to defend his country against attacking Japanese planes on a date that lives in infamy. It was still a defining moment in his 103-year life when he died Tuesday.

Joseph Iscovitz was among the oldest survivors of the Pearl Harbor attack that brought the United States into World War II, a 25-year-old Army Air Corps sergeant stationed at Fort Shafter on the island the morning of the surprise attack, reports the Sun Sentinel.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Iscovitz.jpg
#4483488 - 07/20/19 03:31 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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LIFE REMEMBERED: Dorothy Dwyer, who worked for Gen. Dwight Eisenhower as one of the first women shipped overseas during World War II, has died. She was 98.

Dwyer’s family will remember her for her loving, adventurous and humorous spirit, as well as for her love for gardening and serving her country.

In an recent interview, Dwyer shared a few of her photographs and memories from her military service, including a snapshot of Winston Churchill and the time she literally ran into French Gen. Charles de Gaulle in a hallway.

Dwyer was part of the first step in the offensive against Hitler’s European fortress, when the Allies moved their forces into North Africa in 1943.

At that point, she was working in the nerve center of the Allied effort in Europe and Africa.

“Churchill was there a lot to meet with Eisenhower,” she told The Columbian. “I was going around a corner and walked into the stomach of Gen. de Gaulle,” who stood about 6-foot-5.

“I saluted and left.”

Back then, she was Dorothy Grassby, and had enlisted Oct. 1, 1942, in the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps — forerunner of the Women’s Army Corps (WACs).

Dwyer was previously part of the Boston area’s aircraft warning system, where she would listen for airplane engines and report anything that didn’t sound like an American plane. She also registered military-aged men for the draft. That’s when she started thinking about joining herself.

“I was four months short of 21, but they needed us,” she said in 2009. “Dad said it was too dangerous. I went anyway.”

She completed basic training at a former Army cavalry post, Fort Des Moines, Iowa. In the summer of 1943, Dwyer’s unit boarded the SS Santa Rosa, an ocean liner that had been converted into a troop ship. They landed at the Mediterranean port of Oran, Algeria, on Aug. 21, 1943, then boarded a train for Algiers.

Later in her career, Dwyer joined the staff of Gen. Benjamin Chidlaw, deputy commanding general of the 12th Tactical Air Command. Her job was to write letters home to the families of people killed or missing in action.

“No two letters could be the same,” she remembered. “It was a hard job. Another GI and I did that.”

Dwyer served until June 1945, according to her family.

May God welcome you into your Eternal Rest, Mrs. Dorothy Dwyer, we humbly thank you for your bravery, dedication and leadership during your service in World War II. The world owes you a great debt of gratitude.

R.I.P., Mrs. Dwyer. Truly one of Our Greatest Generation.

The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
“Where Every Day is MEMORIAL DAY”
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Dwyer.jpg
#4483489 - 07/20/19 03:32 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: World War II veteran Mr. Edward Haight has died at age 94.

A Chicago native, Haight enlisted in the Navy in October 1942 at age 19. On D-Day — June 6, 1944 — he was stationed on the flying bridge of the minesweeper USS Raven off Utah Beach as it provided support for landing craft that invaded France to attack Axis troops.

Haight gathered sonar readings and called out instructions to others aboard the 220-foot vessel, a role that earned him the nickname “Ping.”

Last month, Haight recalled that the D-Day invasion was postponed one day because Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, the Allied commander in Europe, determined that rough weather made crossing the English Channel too risky. Haight said the weather improved only slightly the next day, and he battled severe seasickness to carry out his duties on June 6.

On 5 June Raven proceeded to her assigned area off Normandy and participated in the sweep of the fire control area for Utah Beach. From this time until August she was active in clearing approach channels to the Normandy beachheads.

In August 1944 she sailed to Oran, thence to Naples, Italy. From then until June 1945 she performed sweeping and patrol duty in the Straits of Bonifacio, clearing the way for ships en route to the invasion of southern France, and sweeping off the French Riviera and Italian Riviera and off Corsica. During the entire European operation, including D-Day, Raven swept 21 German and Italian naval mines.

Asked if he incurred any injuries, Haight said, “I got hit a few times, but I didn’t get hurt. You can’t be where all that crap is and not get hit.”

Haight returned to Chicago after the war and operated a gas station for a time. He moved to Florida after his first marriage ended, and he married Geri Westphal, a former Cypress Gardens skier, in 1989.

Haight had a career as a salesman of plumbing parts and continued working until age 93. He received a Legion of Honor medal in 2011 from French military officers during a ceremony.

The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
“Where Every Day is Memorial Day”

Attached Files Haight.jpg
#4484362 - 07/28/19 12:34 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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LIFE REMEMBERED - Australian World War II fighter pilot hero Mr. Ron Cundy has died aged 97.

Mr Cundy served in both the RAAF and the RAF, was mentioned in Dispatches and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and Distinguished Flying Medal for gallantry and devotion to duty in bombing operations over Tobruk and the Middle East in 1943.

He was born William Ronald Cundy at Moonan Flat, 60km north-east of Scone, NSW in 1922.

According the Spitfire Association website, Mr Cundy was determined to become a pilot after viewing the landing of an aircraft with two pilots at Moonan Flat, when he was just six years old.

"At eighteen years of age, he attempted to persuade his parents to join the RAAF. It was only after some months that they accepted, and he was then allowed to enlist on the 19th October 1940 as an aircrew trainee under the Empire Air Training Scheme," the Spitfire Association's website states.

He trained on Tiger Moths at Narrandera and at 19 went to Canada to train on North American Harvards where he was awarded his wings and became a Sergeant Pilot. He was then sent to England for operational training on Hurricanes and posted to 135 Squadron RAF stationed at Honiley near Coventry.

During WWII he flew with RAF's 260 Squadron (part of Desert Air Force), and RAAF's 452 Squadron (defence of Darwin, 1943-1945).

In September, 1942, by chance, he and his father, George, who was then serving as a Captain with the 9th Division AIF met up in Alexandria for a very brief catch-up. George was a World War I veteran of Gallipoli/1st Light Horse and rejoined for World War II.

During his World War II service, Ron Cundy flew Tomahawks, Kittyhawks and Spitfires, plus several (captured) German aircraft, including an Me109 (Messerschmitt Bf-109F), Heinkel 111 during time serving with the Desert Air Force (North Africa, 1941-1943).

He was awarded the DFC (Distinguished Flying Cross), DCM (Distinguished Conduct Medal) and was MID (Mentioned in Despatches).

His DFM citation reads: "In the course of numerous operational sorties over enemy territory, Flight-Lieut. Cundy has shown fine qualities of leadership, keenness and determination."

He is credited as an "Ace" with five-and-a-half enemy aircraft shot down. The 'half' was shared with another pilot.

He met Gwen Walsh, from Coogee in early 1942 and they married on September 30, 1944. Gwen passed away three months ago, on April 21.

After the war, Mr Cundy worked at the Register General's Department, among other areas, and eventually as State Electoral Commissioner for NSW, retiring in 1982.

He belonged to the Spitfire Association.

Mr Cundy is survived by his daughters Karen and Pam, nine grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren. His funeral will be held at St. Paul's Church of England Church, Menai at 11am Monday, August 5.

”Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Cundy.jpg
#4484363 - 07/28/19 12:37 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: Auschwitz: Kazimierz Albin the last known survivor of the first convoy to Auschwitz has died. He was 96.

Born in 1922 in Krakow, 70 kilometers (43 miles) east of the infamous death camp where he would later end up, Albin was captured by the Nazis in January 1940 in Slovakia. He had fled Poland the year before in the wake of Germany's invasion of the country.

Albin's intention was to join the Polish Army in France to fight the Nazis but he was thwarted in his mission and ultimately sent to Auschwitz.

He was one of approximately 150,000 non-Jewish Polish prisoners in Auschwitz and survived after escaping on February 27, 1943, along with six other inmates.

Albin recalled that winter's night in a 2015 interview with news agency AFP. "It was a starry night, around minus 8 or minus 10 degrees Celsius (17 or 14 Fahrenheit) outside," he said.

"We took our clothes off and were half way across the Sola River when I heard the siren... ice floes surrounded us," he said. Of around 1.3 million people sent to the death camp, only 802 attempted to escape, according to estimates from the Auschwitz Museum. Of that number, 144 avoided being caught.

After his escape, Albin joined the armed Polish resistance and fought for the liberation of his home country, as well as the concentration camp. His brother remained imprisoned within Auschwitz and was subsequently tortured.

When the war was over, Albin returned to his hometown to study engineering at Krakow Polytechnic School.
He was a member of the International Auschwitz Council, an advisory body to the Polish government that looks after the memorial site.

Following news of Albin's passing, the International Auschwitz Committee's executive vice president, Christoph Heubner, paid tribute to Albin's life.

"Kazimierz Albin saw it as his most important duty and task to speak about Auschwitz and his murdered fellow inmates: He wrote books, he spoke, he traveled and spoke with young people in many countries."

"Every Day is MEMORIAL Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Albin.jpg
#4484364 - 07/28/19 12:38 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS -- WORLD WAR II VETERAN ROBERT MORGENTHAU FOUGHT IN THE BATTLE THE MEDITERRANEAN & IWO JIMA HAS DIED. HE WAS 99.

Robert Morris Morgenthau was born in Manhattan on July 31, 1919, into a family formerly of German-Jewish stock whose roots in America reached back to the 1860s.

His grandfather, the real estate tycoon Henry Morgenthau Sr., was President Wilson’s ambassador to the Ottoman Empire in World War I and a prominent voice against Armenian genocide.

Robert’s father, Henry Jr., was Roosevelt’s treasury secretary from 1934 to 1945, and his mother, Elinor (Fatman) Morgenthau, was a niece of Herbert H. Lehman, the New York Democratic governor and United States senator.

Robert grew up with his brother, Henry III, and his sister, Joan, in New York City, on the family’s farm in upstate East Fishkill, N.Y., and in a privileged world of estates, private schools and social connections, notably with the Kennedys of Boston and Hyannis Port, Mass., and the Roosevelts of Hyde Park, N.Y. He attended the Lincoln School in Manhattan and graduated from the Deerfield Academy in Massachusetts in 1937 and from Amherst College in 1941 with high honors and a political science degree.

As a young man, he raced sailboats with Jack Kennedy off Cape Cod, spent memorable New Year’s Eves at the White House with his father, and in 1939 roasted hot dogs for King George VI and Queen Elizabeth of Britain at the home of his Hudson Valley friends Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt.

On leave from the Navy during World War II, he served mint juleps to Winston Churchill and F.D.R. on the lawn of his family’s apple farm.

While studying at Amherst, Mr. Morgenthau met Martha Pattridge, a Smith College student. They were married in 1943 and had five children. His first wife died in 1972. In 1977 he married Ms. Franks, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist. They had two children.

Besides his wife, he is survived by the children of his first marriage, Jenny Morgenthau, Anne Morgenthau Grand, Elinor Morgenthau, Robert P. Morgenthau, and Barbara Morgenthau Lee; the children of his second marriage, Joshua Franks Morgenthau and Amy Elinor Morgenthau; and by six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

In 2014, Ms. Franks published a memoir, “Timeless: Love, Morgenthau, and Me,” that focused on her long and passionate union with a man almost 30 years her senior.

Mr. Morgenthau had been in the Naval Reserve in college, and after graduation, he went on active duty as an ensign. He passed his physical exam by concealing the near-deafness in his right ear from a boyhood mastoid infection. An officer aboard three destroyers and a minesweeper during World War II, he survived enemy attacks and won decorations for bravery under fire.

During World War II, his destroyer, the U.S.S. Lansdale, was attacked by Nazi torpedo bombers in the Mediterranean off Algiers on April 20, 1944. Cut by explosions, the ship went down with a heavy loss of life. Lieutenant Morgenthau, the executive officer, saved several shipmates, leapt into the water and swam for three hours in the darkness until he and others were picked up by an American warship. In 1945 his ship, the USS. Harry F. Bauer, was hit by a Japanese kamikaze plane off Iwo Jima, but its 550-pound bomb did not explode.

Mustering out after the war as a lieutenant commander, he enrolled in Yale Law School, finished a three-year course in two years and graduated in 1948. He soon joined the New York law firm Patterson, Belknap & Webb and became the personal assistant to the senior partner, Robert P. Patterson, who had been President Harry S. Truman’s secretary of war.

Mr. Patterson died in a plane crash in 1952. Mr. Morgenthau was supposed to have been on the flight — he had accompanied his boss on every other trip — but stayed behind to write a brief. Mr. Morgenthau was a partner in the firm from 1954 to 1961.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Morgenthau.jpg
#4484954 - 08/02/19 10:57 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS -- Pilot Who Was a Daredevil Flier with WASPs During WWII Dies at 103.

Dorothy Eleanor Olsen was part of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) -- a group of civilian volunteers who moved planes across the country, hauled targets for shooting practice and performed other flying duties. She was stationed at Long Beach Army Air Base, California, from 1942 to 1944 and was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 2009.

During her time as a WASP pilot, Olsen flew about 60 missions as part of the 6th Ferry Group, often alone, according to a report from the Chinook Observer in 2011. She also flew about 29 different aircraft. Her favorite was the P-51.

"Mom said the P-38 was an old woman's plane. She said anybody could fly that," Stranburg said. "She said that the P-51, you had to stay on top of that."

She also didn't care much for the bomber planes. Debbie Jennings, friends with Olsen since about 2003 and developer of a WASP exhibit at the Museum of Flight in Seattle, said her friend preferred the fighter plane because she was by herself and could do whatever she wanted.

Jennings said Olsen would get a kick out of scaring farmers on their tractors and fly right behind them. She would do the same at railroad stations just because.

Stranburg said her mom got chewed out by ranking officers for flying like that and once got reprimanded for using her landing gear at high speeds. One time, she flew upside down and a piece of the plane fell off -- but the landing crew never said a word, and Olsen's son, Kim Olsen, has the piece to this day.

"She was like nobody I've ever known. So determined to do whatever she wanted to do," Jennings said.

At the time, women and people of color were fighting for respect in the military.

According to NPR, during the last WASP training class, Henry "Hap" Arnold, the commanding general of the U.S. Army Air Forces, said when the program began he wasn't sure "whether a slip of a girl could fight the controls of a B-17 in heavy weather."

"Now in 1944, it is on the record that women can fly as well as men," Arnold said.

Jennings said some of the male pilots were jealous of how many different planes Olsen was able to fly.

On two occasions, Olsen received v-mail, or victory mail, postcards from male pilots who had found Olsen's name and address in the cockpit of a plane she ferried. In the last line of the postcard, one pilot from Italy wrote, "Despite the fact that a woman once flew it, it appears to perform perfectly," Jennings said.

"They were the first women to fly military aircraft for the United States," Jennings said. "The women had to jump into any aircraft that needed to be moved, whether it was for training or for combat, and know how to fly it and fly it wherever it needed to go."

WASPs were not recognized as veterans until 1977 under President Jimmy Carter.

Olsen grew up reading about World War I planes and flying in Woodburn, Oregon, in the 1920s, according to a report from The Seattle Times. She was inspired to pursue flight after reading 'The Red Knight of Germany" by Floyd Gibbons.

As she pursued her pilot's license, Olsen taught tap dance and continued to teach after receiving her certification. She was one of three women to get her private flying license in the Portland area by 1939, according to the Chinook Observer.

Once she joined the WASPs, she kept a pair of black DeLiso Debs and socks underneath her seat in every plane she flew, Stranburg said.

"She'd date a new man every night and go dancing, dump them and take off on her next plane," Stranburg said.

When the WASPs disbanded in 1944, Olsen had to pay her own way from Long Beach back home.

Stranburg said Olsen got a job flying war-weary planes after the war -- aircraft deemed no longer safe for combat missions. She once worked with two other men and flew planes to Wyoming.

"They got into a snowstorm and were low on fuel," Stranburg said. "The men wanted to turn back and Mom said, 'No, you're taught never turn back.'"

She said they knew the airport was near, but weren't sure where. The townspeople heard them flying over head and directed the pilots to the landing strip using car headlights.

"She had so many close brushes with death but managed to slide by so many times," Stranburg said.

Olsen later married Harold W. Olsen, a Washington State trooper, and settled down in University Place.

Stranburg said her mom was always fair, particularly when Stranburg and her brother Kim would fight growing up. One time, Olsen told her kids to clean up dog vomit in the kitchen, but neither wanted to.

"She walked up there, took her hand, and [split it in half]. 'You clean that, and you clean that,'" Stranburg said.

Stranburg said her mom didn't fly after she and her brother were born and didn't even think of flying commercial or private planes.

"She said, 'Why would I want to fly a Cessna when I've flown a P-51?'" Stranburg said.

Olsen never lost her flying spirit, though. She often "drove with authority," neighbor Duncan Foley said with a chuckle. "She drove like she was driving a fighter jet."

According to her memorial obituary on the Edwards Memorial website, that spirit landed her a speeding ticket in her 1965 poppy orange Mustang.

Stranburg said flying was the highlight of her mom's life, and that she loved to look at clouds and remember flying through them.

"Every sunny day when you see clouds, think of mom," Stranburg said. "She's up there doing slow rolls in a P-38."

Before Olsen was laid to rest, Jennings read the poem "Celestial Flight" by WASP Elizabeth MacKethan Magid, which is "now required reading at all WASP departures."

The first verse is:
"She is not dead --
But only flying higher,
Higher than she's flown before,
And earthly limitations will hinder her no more.

”Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest Generations Foundation

Attached Files 67737892_2282552005127374_3098247003398733824_n.jpg

“Government has three primary functions. It should provide for military defense of the nation. It should enforce contracts between individuals. It should protect citizens from crimes against themselves or their property. When government-- in pursuit of good intentions tries to rearrange the economy, legislate morality, or help special interests, the cost comes in inefficiency, lack of motivation, and loss of freedom. Government should be a referee, not an active player.” - Milton Friedman
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Archie McInnes death: Battle of Britain hero dies hours after celebrating his 100th birthday

Tributes were being paid today to a Battle of Britain veteran who died surrounded by friends and family hours after celebrating his 100th birthday.

The death of Archie McInnes takes the number of surviving members of The Few to five, his biographer has said.

Mr McInnes, who flew Hurricanes during the battle in the skies over southern England, completed his pilot training aged 21 and was commissioned the next day.

He died hours after celebrating his 100th birthday on Wednesday.

His biographer and friend Jonny Cracknell wrote on Twitter: "It is with a heavy heart and incredible sadness to advise the tragic news that Battle of Britain hero Archie McInnes sadly passed away last night, just hours after celebrating his 100th birthday amongst friends and family.

Attached Files EA6bWX-WwAEuRHi.jpg

“Government has three primary functions. It should provide for military defense of the nation. It should enforce contracts between individuals. It should protect citizens from crimes against themselves or their property. When government-- in pursuit of good intentions tries to rearrange the economy, legislate morality, or help special interests, the cost comes in inefficiency, lack of motivation, and loss of freedom. Government should be a referee, not an active player.” - Milton Friedman
#4485043 - 08/03/19 10:28 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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As I said in another thread. My dad was a spook and didn't do half of what some of these men did during the war (as far as I know). I only wish he had lived as long as some of these fine men.


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#4485044 - 08/03/19 10:33 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Originally Posted by F4UDash4
AMERICA REMEMBERS -- It is with great sadness, we have learned that WWII Veteran George Haines, one of Rochester's most visible and vocal World War II veterans, has died. He was 94.

Haines, who lived in Greece, was among the veterans of Rochester's that have been involved with The Greatest Generations Foundation programs in recent years.

He served in the U.S. Army 24th Division in the Pacific and saw two years of combat.



RIP to a fellow Victory Division soldier. First to Fight!

My mom got me Tom Brokaw’s book “The Greatest Generation,” as soon as I finish my current book I’m going to read it. There aren’t many days in which I don’t think about what these men (and women), or men & women from the days of the Continental Army until today, have done and sacrificed for their country.


Phil

"Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils."
#4485322 - 08/06/19 10:39 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: Well-known Pearl Harbor Survivor Everett Hyland dies at 96.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Hyland was a crew member of the battleship USS Pennsylvania, the flagship of the Pacific Fleet, and immediately reported to his battle station when the attack began.

“If we ever go to war, the last place in the world I wanted to be trapped was down in the bowels of the ship,” the longtime Honolulu resident said in a Navy interview. “I wanted to be top side, so if something happened, I could get off it. So I volunteered for antenna repair squad. I was with the radio division.”

When general quarters sounded, he realized there was nothing to be done at his battle station, so he and others began collecting ammo for a 3-inch 50-caliber anti-aircraft gun. The “Pennsy” was in Drydock No. 1 at the time.

“We took one hit. The one that hit our ship just happened to be where we were,” Hyland recalled.

The 18-year-old was so badly wounded by the aerial bomb that his own friends did not recognize him, the park service said. Flash burns covered his body. He had an ankle wound, a chipped bone in his right leg, his right hand was ripped open, he had a bullet hole through his right thigh, five pieces of shrapnel in his left leg, a chunk blown out of his left thigh — among other injuries.

"At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them."

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation

Attached Files Hyland.jpg
#4485984 - 08/12/19 11:22 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: Its with great sadness, we learn the news that World War II Normandy Ranger Mr. Sheldon “Shel” Bare, of Altoona has died. He was 96.

Sheldon is a U.S. Army veteran of World War II, who served with honor, valor, and distinction with the 2nd Ranger Battalion-D Company. He participated in the Allied invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944, assaulting the cliffs at Point du Hoc where he was where he was awarded one of his two purple hearts.

For his service he was awarded: 3 Bronze Stars, a Purple Heart with Oak Leaf cluster, Combat infantry badge, Good conduct medal, National Defense Service Medal, Presidential Unit citation with arrowhead, American Campaign Medal, WW II victory medal, the ETO medal, Battle of the Buldge medal, D-Day Medal, Combat Service Medal, and The European-African-Middle Eastern Service Medal. He was also awarded the Unit French Crux Querrie, and in 2011, was awarded the Legion of Honor from the French Government, France’s highest order that recognizes military and civilians alike for their bravery or honorable service to the country.

After WW II, he served with the 772nd Military Police Battalion, Fort George C. Mende, Maryland. Prior to WWII, Sheldon worked with the PA Railroad, after the war he worked with the PA Association for the Blind where he retired in 1988.

He was a member of the Juniata VFW-Fort Apache, the Bavarian Aid Society, the Newburg Fire Hall, and served on the Board of Directors for the PA Association for the Blind and Physically Handicapped.

Sheldon enjoyed reading, John Wayne movies, sports of all kinds, telling stories and the camaraderie of his fellow veterans.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Bare.jpg
#4485985 - 08/12/19 11:22 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: Its with great sadness, we learn the news that World War II veteran Mr. Ralph Mayville, one of orginal members of the 'Black Devil' commandos, has died. He was 97.

He was one of Canada’s first commandos in the Second World War, tormenting the Germans behind enemy lines in Italy as part of the secretive and deadly effective Devil’s Brigade.

Mayville, who grew up in Amherstburg but later lived in Windsor, died on Friday, two weeks shy of his 98th birthday.

As part of the Canadian-American First Special Service Force — predecessor to such elite units as the U.S. Navy SEALs — Mayville and his comrades, who only gained recognition and fame for their daring wartime exploits decades later, received the U.S. Congressional Gold Medal in 2015.

A member of the Essex Scottish Regiment stationed in England (and, unknowingly to the troops, preparing for D-Day), Mayville transferred to the Royal Canadian Regiment and volunteered for the Devil’s Brigade in order to join the action sooner, enticed also in part by the extra 75 cents a day paid to paratroopers.

Activated in 1942 as a commando unit of 1,800 Americans and Canadians, the special force was tasked with penetrating deep behind enemy lines at the combat front in near-suicide missions designed to sow terror in the enemy ranks.

Dubbed the Black Devils by their foes, Mayville said they would sneak over silently with blackened faces — “slitting a couple of throats” — and return before dawn. On “aggressive patrols,” they’d place playing cards on the sleeping Germans, with morale-busting warnings that “the worst has yet to come.”

Given his paratrooper wings even though he missed parachute training ahead of being deployed to Anzio beachhead, where the Devil’s Brigade fought for 99 days straight, Mayville refused to wear the insignia until he actually got his chance to jump out of an aircraft. That opportunity to earn his set of silver wings came in 2014, when, at the age of 92, the great-grandfather signed all the required legal documents and parachuted from a height of 14,000 feet near Niagara Falls.

The old soldier made one concession to his age, agreeing to a tandem descent. “I would’ve liked to jump by myself, but that’s the way it is,” he told the Star at the time.

Mayville, predeceased by his wife, had two children, four grandchildren and numerous great-grandchildren.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Mayville.jpg
#4485986 - 08/12/19 11:23 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: Its with great sadness, we learn the news that Pearl Harbor survivor Mr. Lonnie Cook, one of the last members of USS Arizona’s surviving crew at Pearl Harbor, has died at the age of 98.

Cook was inside one of the USS Arizona's turrets on Dec. 7, 1941, according to officials with the memorial. Officials said 1,177 of his USS Arizona shipmates died as a result of the attack.

Cook, a Morris, Oklahoma, native, went on to fight in World War II, and was later recognized for his service. Over the course of his eight year career, he fought in 12 battles, served on seven ships, and received many medals and awards. He retired from the Navy in 1948, and went on to a 20 year career as a welder, working on various areas around the Central Coast, including the Moss Landing Smoke Stacks. He was also an avid trap shooter, hunter and fisherman.

In 1968, 27 years after the attack on Pearl Harbor, Cook returned for the first time with his wife and daughter by his side. Cunanan says, "We went out and went onto the memorial. He had goose bumps. Not verbal, just staring off into space. Seeing everything again is what it looked like to me." That was one of three visits back to Pearl Harbor for Cook. His final trip was for the 70th Anniversary in 2011.

There are now only four remaining USS Arizona survivors: Don Stratton, Lauren Bruner, Lou Conter and Ken Potts.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Cook.jpg
#4485987 - 08/12/19 11:23 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: Normandy World War II Veteran Mr. Ralph Ticcioni who parachuted into Normandy on D-Day has died. He was 96.

Before June 6, 1944, Ticcioni had made three practice jumps in England. D-Day was his first taste of combat.

On the night of June 5, he sat in the back of a transport plane, weighed down with around 80 pounds of gear, his face darkened with charcoal, and waited for the light on the wall to turn yellow.

When it did, he stood up with the rest of his 82nd Airborne unit and clipped his static line hook to a wire overhead. He checked the man in front of him while the soldier behind Ticcioni checked to ensure his static line hook was secure.

Then the light turned green.

"Of all places, I landed on top of a barn. The barns in this area of Normandy were thatch, so it was a soft landing. My parachute was caught on a weather vane," Ticcioni recalled in 2016. "I hung there for a while and got my thoughts together, got out my knife and cut myself down. I slid down into some horse manure."

Ticcioni fought his way across Europe, helping to liberate a continent devastated by war. Then he returned home to Milwaukee and got a job at a dairy, working his way up to plant manager and retiring after 40 years. After his first wife died, he remarried. His second wife died nine years ago.

"Every Day is MEMORIAL DAY"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Ticcioni.jpg
#4485988 - 08/12/19 11:24 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: Its with great sadness, we learn the news that Pearl Harbor Survivor Mr. Raymond "Papa Ray" Richmond, of Serra Mesa, CA has died. He was 99.

On December 07, 1941 -- Ray Richmond, was below deck on the battleship Oklahoma, shaving his face, when bombs and torpedoes hit all those mornings ago. As the ship rolled onto its side, Richmond made his way free. But he shattered his hip in the escape and then had to swim through water aflame with burning oil. He spent almost a year in the hospital.

The USS Oklahoma lost 429 men in the bombing, more than any other ship outside of USS Arizona when waves of Japanese planes launched from aircraft carriers caught the Pacific Fleet unawares on a sleepy Sunday morning. They destroyed ships and airplanes, killed 2,400 Americans, and pushed the United States into World War II — and from there onto a perch as the globe’s preeminent political and cultural power.

“When someone you love becomes a memory, the memory becomes a treasure.” RIP Ray Richmond.

"Every Day is MEMORIAL Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Richmond.jpg
#4485989 - 08/12/19 11:24 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS -- It's with great sadness, we learn the news that Normandy World War II veteran Mr. Raymond Rutt, 3820 Quartermaster Gas Supply Company has died. He was 101.

Born to George and Anna Elizabeth Rutt on February 12, 1918, Raymond was the youngest of 14 children and attended the Campbell School through the 10th grade.

Before the outbreak of World War II, Raymond worked for Maxon's Construction Company at the Naval Ammunition Depot. Raymond also worked for Cafferty & Tipton Construction in Grand Island where he was the grease foreman on Caterpillar Tractors.

PFC. Raymond Rutt served in the United States Army from December 28, 1942, to January 13, 1946. He served in France, England, Belgium, Germany during the Normandy Northern-Frances and Rhineland campaigns with the 3820 Quartermaster Gas Supply Company as a truck driver.

Raymond worked with the Quartermaster GS Company on Omaha Beach at Normandy shortly after the main seaborne invasion into France. He received the Good Conduct Medal, Distinguished Unit Badge, Bronze Service Arrowhead, and Carbine Marksman for his service during World War II.

After the war, Raymond worked in Lexington for Luther-Rutt Gravel Pit pumping gravel and ran a corn picker for Luther. On August 9, 1947, Raymond married Kathryn Elizabeth Mohrlang and lived in Broken Bow and ran a Grade A Dairy in partnership with Dan Thomas. They moved to Mason City to form an alliance with Buss Luther and run a Herford Ranch until retirement in 1981. Raymond was a lifetime member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars.

"Every Day is MEMORIAL Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Rutt.jpg
#4486581 - 08/18/19 03:06 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS - World War II veteran Mr. Jean DeCurtins, the last surviving member of a Stillwater-area war veterans club, has died. He was 100.

For the last two and a half years, the bachelor was the lone survivor of the A&D Last Man’s Club, a social group born of the 180 Stillwater-area infantrymen who shipped out with the National Guard months before World War II.

An Army private first class with the heavy-weapons Company D, DeCurtins served through six battles and 14 engagements in North Africa and Italy. He spent three months in a hospital after a exploded mortar shell left shrapnel in his head. He returned to battlefield and later was awarded a Purple Heart.

Until his brother, John, died in 2018, the two men shared a two-bedroom home, a half-mile from the Stillwater Public Library, which DeCurtins visited twice a day to read five newspapers.

With no family of his own, DeCurtins found friendship in the library staff. After he moved to the senior living center, librarian Lori Houston would visit him daily with the Pioneer Press in hand.

“Every Day is MEMORIAL Day”
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files DeCurtins.jpg
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AMERICA REMEMBERS - Normandy World War II veteran Mr. Norman Duncan, member of the 29th Division has died. He was 100.

Centenarian, World War II veteran of the famed 29th Division, former chairman of the International Caregivers Association Board, and founder of Labor of Love weekend in Loudoun Norman Duncan died Friday.

Duncan was a longtime advocate for caregivers. He was his wife Elsie’s primary caregiver as she lived with Alzheimer’s until her death in 2015. Labor of Love weekend, observed in Loudoun each Labor Day weekend, honors and calls attention to the work of caregivers.

He remained active in Loudoun until the end of his life, serving on the board of the Loudoun Symphony and in the American Legion, as well as on a number of county government committees including the Transit Advisory Board and the Economic Development Advisory Commission.

Among his many accolades, Duncan was last year bestowed the rank of Knight of the French Legion of Honor at a ceremony at the French Embassy in Washington, DC, in recognition of the services he provided during military campaigns throughout France during the war. It is the highest French Order of Merit for military and civilian individuals, and was established in 1802 by Napoleon Bonaparte.

Duncan served with the 29th Infantry Division and supported the allied troops storming the beaches of Normandy in 1944 as a U.S. Army master supply sergeant.

“Every Day is MEMORIAL Day”
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Duncan.jpg
#4486603 - 08/18/19 07:51 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS - Mr. Rodney Ebersviller, wounded and captured in WWII, dies at age 94.

In early 1945, Rodney Ebersviller was walking with other American prisoners of war and their guards from one German camp to another when they encountered a farm woman as she pulled a fresh loaf of rye bread from an outdoor oven.

Ebersviller was cold and hungry. He and the other Allied soldiers were on the brink of starvation. The German woman offered every prisoner and guard a warm slice. Nothing had ever tasted so good and nothing ever would match it, he told his children many years later. He spent the rest of his life seeking the perfect sauerkraut rye bread recipe and its comforting effect.

Born in Pelican Rapids, Minn., on Oct. 8, 1924, one of five children to Alwine and William Ebersviller. He graduated from Fergus Falls High School in 1942 and enlisted in the Army in 1943. On his way to basic training, he met his future wife, Barbara — or Bobbie — on a train. She was heading back home to St. Louis after her first year at Carleton College in Northfield.

Once deployed, it didn’t take long for Ebersviller to see combat. He was a staff sergeant when his machine-gun squad was outflanked by a German tank squadron during the Battle of the Bulge in December 1944. Ebersviller was wounded and captured. After a brief stay in a German hospital, he spent the rest of the war in prison camps.

His final camp near Hammelburg was liberated by U.S. soldiers in April 1945, according to U.S. National Archives records. Ebersviller was awarded the Purple Heart upon discharge that year.

Despite this harrowing experience, or maybe because of it, he rarely talked about the war as a young man, said Ann Pederson, his daughter.

“When I was growing up, I had no idea he was in the war. I came home from high school one day and was talking about what I had learned about POWs in the war, and that’s when my mom told me he had been one,” Pederson said.

“Over the years, maybe he just became OK with it. He became very active in local veterans organizations the last 20 years of his life,” she said.

After the war, Ebersviller attended the University of Minnesota, where he was reunited with Bobbie, who had transferred there. They married in 1948 and moved to Fergus Falls so he could join his father in running the family-owned John Deere Implement business. The next year, he and Bobbie moved to Rothsay, Minn., to open a farm equipment dealership. There, the couple raised four children.

He ended his career back at work at the Ebersviller Implement store in Fergus Falls before selling the business and retiring in 1982.

“Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Ebersviller.jpg
#4486645 - 08/19/19 10:43 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Thank you F4U for keeping this thread active. Sometimes I just can't find the words to describe what these veterans have done for our great country.


“Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And if you gaze long enough into an abyss, the abyss will gaze back into you.”
#4489581 - 09/15/19 04:47 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: It is with great sadness, we learn the news that Paratrooper of the 101st Airborne Division Mr. Raymond Pierre "Frenchy" Defer, has died. He was 96.

Born in St. Jean de Losne, France, on June 3, 1923, Ray Defer immigrated to the United States when he was 15 years old. He joined the United States Army at the age of 19 and eventually became a medic with 502nd Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division.

According to his Military DD-214 military discharge papers, he experienced combat in Normandy, Holland, Belgium and the Central European Pocket.

On June 06, 1944 Raymond Defer landed near Liesville-sur-Douve (near Carentan) on D-Day in Normandy where he was wounded with shrapnel shortly after that.

Raymond Defer then jumped in Holland at Best during Operation Market Garden to help seize the small highway bridge over the Dommel river north of St. Oedenrode and the railroad and road bridges over the Wilhelmina Canal at Best. Defer was wounded a second time during a patrol through the Zonsche forest, trying to move toward the town of Best and the bridge.

During the Germans major offensive west through the Ardennes Forest, Defer and the 502nd held positions on the north and northwest portion of the surrounded city of Bastogne.

Raymond Defer was the recipient of two Bronze Stars, Purple Heart, good conduct medal, presidential service ribbon and later was a recipient of the French Legion of Honour.

After returning home, he became self-employed and opened Frenchy's Appliance Service.

On behalf of TGGF and its members, we salute Mr. Defer for his dedication and service to our freedom.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Defer.jpg
#4489582 - 09/15/19 04:47 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Pearl Harbor Survivor James R. Leavelle, Detective at Lee Harvey Oswald’s Side, Dies at 99.

James R. Leavelle, the big man in the white Stetson who epitomized the horrors of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in one of the most famous photographs of all time — the killing of Lee Harvey Oswald by Jack Ruby — died on Thursday at a hospital in Denver. He was 99.

His death was confirmed by his daughter, Karla Leavelle.

Mr. Leavelle, a veteran Dallas homicide detective who had survived the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, was handcuffed to Mr. Oswald and was leading him through a police station basement on Nov. 24, 1963, when Mr. Ruby, a nightclub owner, stepped out of the crowd and pumped a fatal bullet into the prisoner. The shooting, with Mr. Oswald’s pained grimace and Detective Leavelle’s stricken glower, was chillingly captured by Robert H. Jackson of The Dallas Times Herald in an iconic photograph that won the Pulitzer Prize the following year.

Moments earlier, he and Mr. Oswald had had an eerie exchange, Mr. Leavelle often later recounted. “Lee,” he recalled saying, “if anybody shoots at you, I hope they are as good a shot as you.”

To which, he said, Mr. Oswald replied: “You’re being melodramatic.”

At the time, two days after President Kennedy had been gunned down in a motorcade through downtown Dallas, Mr. Oswald was a suspect in the killing of a Dallas police officer, J.D. Tippit, and had yet to be conclusively tied to the assassination. But after Detective Leavelle asked him whether he had shot the police officer, Mr. Oswald aroused the detective’s suspicions by insisting, “I didn’t shoot anybody,” as if, Mr. Leavelle later recounted, there had been another shooting as well.

In the decades that followed, Mr. Leavelle was in constant demand as a speaker, invariably asked to recall the fateful moment. “I saw him, he was standing in the middle of the driveway,” he said of Mr. Ruby in an interview with The New York Times in 2006.

“He had a pistol by his side, I saw out of the corner of my eye,” Mr. Leavelle continued. “I jerked back on Oswald to get him behind me. I had my hand through his belt. All I succeeded in doing, I turned him so instead of dead center the bullet hit four inches to the left of his navel and two inches above.”

Another detective, L.C. Graves, on Mr. Oswald’s other side, grabbed Mr. Ruby’s pistol around the cylinder, preventing another shot, Mr. Leavelle recalled. “I could see Ruby’s fingers flexing on the trigger, trying to fire,” he said. He knocked Mr. Oswald to the floor, removed the handcuffs and got him loaded into an ambulance. “I tried to take his pulse but I never could detect any pulse,” Mr. Leavelle said. He remembered hearing a groan and sigh in the ambulance, which he said he later took as the moment of Mr. Oswald’s expiration, although he was pronounced dead at Parkland Hospital, where President Kennedy had been pronounced dead two days earlier.

Mr. Leavelle joined the Dallas Police Department in 1950, but his life had hardly lacked drama before then. The son of farm parents, James Robert Leavelle was born on Aug. 23, 1920, and grew up in northeast Texas near Texarkana. He joined the Navy out of high school in 1939 and was stationed at Pearl Harbor. He was on a destroyer tender that carried supplies to other ships when the Japanese bombed the fleet about a mile away on Dec. 7, 1941. He was unhurt in the attack, but while at sea in the Pacific during a severe storm in 1942, he fell off a ship’s ladder and had to be evacuated to a naval hospital in California.

There he met a nurse who became his wife, Taimi, who died in 2014. They had three children, Karla, Tanya Evers and James Craig. His son died in 2009. He is survived by his daughters, three grandchildren and a great-grandchild.

Unable to return to the fighting, Mr. Leavelle became a civilian employee of the Army Air Force, running a military warehouse in Riverside, Calif. He then became an auditor for the federal government, investigating colleges receiving money under the G.I. Bill.

He spent his first six years on the Dallas force in patrol before making detective in 1956, and worked his way up from the burglary and theft squad to homicide, where he was working when President Kennedy was assassinated on Nov. 22, 1963. Mr. Leavelle retired in 1976 and founded a polygraph business, which he turned over to his daughter Karla in 1980. He underwent triple-bypass heart surgery in 2004.

Mr. Leavelle, who remained active into his late 90s, traveled with the help of a Dallas police officer to the National Law Enforcement Museum in Washington in late 2018 to rerecord an oral history he had made several years earlier before the museum’s opening in October.

“Every Day is Memorial Day”
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Leavelle.jpg
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: World War II veteran 'Screaming Eagle' Henry Ochsner, 321st Glider Artillery Battalion of the 101st Airborne Division on D-Day has died. He was 96.

Henry ‘Len” Ochsner was born in Hell Gate Montana in February of 1923 at the west end of the Missoula Valley in Missoula County Montana. It is now a ghost town.

On D-Day June 6th 1944, then 21 year old Private Henry L. Ochsner belonged to the 321st Glider Artillery Battalion that would go on to provide fire support for the “Screaming Eagle” paratroopers of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment outside Sainte Marie du Mont near Utah Beach for their part of Operation Overlord.

They launched from Upottery Airbase in Devon England, and dropped into Normandy France in the early morning hours before the allied landings. Henry was 21 years old at that time.

Private Ochsner next himself in Bastogne during the Battle of the Bulge no less in that famous stand the 101st Abn. made there telling their German counterparts “Nuts” when asked to surrender. They held out until General Patton came and relieved them in that bitter cold winter battle that lasted from December 1944 through January 1945. The members of the 321st Glider Artillery Battalion held out with no winter clothes and little rations and ammunition and were awarded a unit citation for holding Bastogne.

Private Henry L. Ochsner’s significant decorations include the French Croix de Guerre, the Belgian Fourragere, the Presidential Unit Citation and the EAME Campaign Medal with four battle stars. He can now add to that the National Order of The Legion of Honor in the rank of Chevalier (Knight). This is the highest honor France bestows.

“Every Day is MEMORIAL Day”
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

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AMERICA REMEMBERS: It is with great sadness, we learn the death of World War II veteran Mr. Lauren Bruner, survivor of USS Arizona attack during Pearl Harbor. He was 98.

His passing means just three surviving crewmembers who were aboard the Arizona that day remain: Don Stratton, 97, Lou Conter, 98, and Ken Potts, 98.

“Lauren was always quick with a laugh and had a smile that would brighten an entire room,” Stratton wrote on Facebook Wednesday. “We are beyond heartbroken.”

Bruner regularly attended the annual commemorations of the attack held each Dec. 7 at the Pearl Harbor National Memorial.

During a news conference there in 2014, Bruner announced that he had finally decided to have the urn that would hold his cremated remains interred in the sunken hull of the Arizona.

“Well, I studied it for a long time,” Bruner explained with his characteristic humor. “All my family and friends have been buried in various places, cemeteries. But it seems like after a while, nobody pays attention to them anymore after about five years. I hope that a lot of people will still be coming to the Arizona. I would be glad to see them.”

Daniel Martinez, chief historian for the Pearl Harbor National Memorial, which manages the USS Arizona Memorial, said in a tweet that discussions with the family regarding the placement of Bruner’s ashes aboard the ship will be forthcoming.

Bruner chronicled his experience of the attack in “Second to the Last to Leave USS Arizona,” a book he co-authored in 2017.

Bruner was born Nov. 4, 1920, and enlisted in the Navy 1938. The following year, he was assigned to the USS Arizona as a fire controlman in charge of the ship’s .50-caliber guns.

In a 2014 interview with Arizona Public Radio, Bruner recalled that, on the morning of Dec. 7, 1941, he raced up from below the ship's deck when the attack began. There, he saw a Japanese plane fly by so closely that he could see the pilot’s face with “a big old grin on his face, mouth wide open.”

“I could see all those teeth,” he said. “You wanted to reach and bust him one.”

Bruner raced for his battle station, but a Japanese Zero fixed its sights on him, fellow survivor Stratton recalled in his memoir, “All the Gallant Men.”

“A blast from its guns, and bullets bit metal,” Stratton wrote. “One of those shots struck flesh, hitting the back of Lauren’s lower leg. He limped onto the sky platform, a trail of blood following him.”

The Arizona was hit with four bombs, one of them crashing through three levels of the ship and into a powder magazine.

“It blew the heck out of everything, just lifted the bow about 30 feet off the water,” Bruner said in the 2014 interview. “It had one hell of a fire.”

Bruner, Stratton and four others were stranded amid the smoke and fire that quickly consumed the Arizona.

The men escaped death by grappling hand-over-hand for 70 feet on a rope to a nearby repair ship, the USS Vestal. Bruner had burns on over 70% of his body.

He was taken to the hospital ship USS Solace and transferred to a mainland hospital after the turn of the year.

After he recovered, Bruner was assigned to the USS Coghlan, participating in eight major engagements in the Aleutian Islands and seven operation in the South Pacific operations.

He retired from the Navy in 1947.

The Dec. 7 attack left Bruner traumatized, and he suffered decades of “nightmares, visions of dead bodies and memories of the stench of burning human flesh,” according to the preface of his book.

He made a last request with its publication: “I do not want to further discuss or answer any questions concerning the actual attack,” Bruner wrote. “As you read these chapters, know they were real and that it was truly Hell on Earth. The horrors of what I witnessed on that morning have kept me from sleep for many years after.

“I chose to face the future and not let my past dictate what might be ahead.”

"Every Day is Mmeorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation

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Francis Currey, one of three remaining WWII Medal of Honor recipients, dies at 94

Francis Currey, one of the three living World War II Medal of Honor recipients and whose likeness was used to create Medal of Honor G.I. Joe in 1998, died on Tuesday. He was 94.


Currey, a native of Selkirk, New York, joined the U.S. Army when he was just 17. He was in Belgium during the Battle of the Bulge in 1944 as an automatic rifleman with the 3rd Platoon.

On Dec. 21, 1944, as German tanks approached Currey and his company while they were guarding a bridge crossing, Currey found a bazooka in a nearby factory. He crossed the street to secure rockets during an intense fight from enemy tanks and infantrymen. With the help of a companion, Currey knocked out a tank with one shot.

Moving to another position, Currey killed or wounded three German soldiers standing in the doorway of an enemy-held house. He emerged from cover and alone advanced to within 50 yards of the house. He ended up rescuing five Americas who were trapped and taking fire inside a building.

According to his biography on the Congressional Medal of Honor website, "Sgt. Currey was greatly responsible for inflicting heavy losses in men and material on the enemy, for rescuing 5 comrades, 2 of whom were wounded, and for stemming an attack which threatened to flank his battalion's position."

Currey received the Medal of Honor near Reims, France, on July 27, 1945, when he was 20 years old.

After being discharged from the Army in 1946, he served as a counselor in the Veterans Administration. He also owned a landscaping business.

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