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#4449992 - 11/22/18 03:33 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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#4450023 - 11/22/18 06:09 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Yesterday I went the funeral of the wife of my old friend Doug from the Royal Navy. She was almost 90 and had been married to Doug almost 70 years. Her grandson gave a tribute that ended by reading a letter that Doug had written to her in 1943 while at sea. They don't know where he was at the time. It was very poignant and ended with " it is hard being away from you for such a long time. We will be together soon "

They are together now forever.


Archie Smythe

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#4451491 - 12/02/18 08:23 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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100-year-old Bugler Albert Madden Laid to Rest in Massachusetts

Albert Madden played taps countless times at military funerals during the past century.

On Friday afternoon, the solemn melody was played for him during a funeral with full military honors and a three-volley salute at Massachusetts National Cemetery.

Madden, 100, a U.S. Army veteran who served during World War II, the Korean War and Vietnam War, died at his Hyannis home on Nov. 25.

"I think he would have been proud of the ceremony," said his son, David Madden, of East Sandwich. "The military played a very big role in his life."

In addition to his service to the country, the elder Madden leaves behind a musical legacy that began as a child playing the bugle, trumpet and coronet and lasted a lifetime.

He played throughout the world as a member of the Army's 9th Infantry Division Band, and back home with the Barnstable Town Band.

While he could certainly play the pop tunes of the big band era and beyond, it was his rendition of taps at veterans observances, memorials and funerals for which he will be most remembered.

At the age of 92, he was invited by the Pentagon to play taps on arguably the melancholy bugle call's biggest stage: Arlington National Cemetery.

"I'll be the oldest bugler, using the oldest horn, to ever play taps at the Arlington cemetery," he told a Times reporter in 2010.

He even played the horn at his own 100th birthday earlier this year, according to his son.

World War II veteran John Kelley, 92, braved the late-November chill to bid farewell to Madden.

"He was a very dedicated man," Kelley said. "He played at every single veteran's memorial event on Cape Cod."

The honor of playing taps at Madden's funeral went to longtime friend Daniel LePage, who drove him to the engagement at Arlington eight years ago.

Like Madden, LePage played the tune live during the ceremony, a tradition that has become less common in recent years, with many services now featuring recorded versions.

Madden, realizing in his later years that playing taps was becoming a lost art, would don his military uniform and play at veterans' funerals upon request, his son said.

Madden's daughter-in-law Debra addressed the nearly 50 mourners who gathered for the committal ceremony.

"As we speak, he is probably conducting a band of angels," she said. "Let's not mourn his death, let's celebrate his life. One hundred years is a lot to celebrate."

Attached Files bugleralbermadden1800.png.jpg
#4451565 - 12/03/18 12:06 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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#4454425 - 12/22/18 08:18 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: It is with great sadness that we learn the news that World War II veteran Mr. Karl E. Petersen, has died. He was 96.

Petersen was born March 11, 1922, in Warren, Pennsylvania to Danish parents, Karl and Olga Petersen. As the oldest of four siblings, Petersen grew up in Warren and graduated from Warren High School in 1940.

He enlisted in the United States Army in 1942 and served for three years in Europe during World War II as a communication technician in the 461st Anti-Aircraft Battalion, 69th Infantry Division.

Landing on Omaha Beach, France, on D-Day plus 7 – June 13, 1944 – it moved all the way to the Elbe River by April 25, 1945, distinguishing itself in many historic battles.

In May 1945, his unit was stationed near a hospital in Leipzig, Germany where he met a German nurse named Anita. The two spent time communicating for six weeks with the help from Petersen’s German-English dictionary until his unit was shipped back to the states, according to his daughter. Petersen and Anita wrote to each other for two years until she agreed to marry him.

In December 1948, he paid Anita’s fare to travel to the United States and were soon married on Jan. 15, 1949 in Warren, Pennsylvania. Years later, they drove across the country with their three daughters Judy, Christa, and Karlene after Petersen transferred his mail carrier job to the Newhall, California post office in 1964.

Soon after, Petersen purchased a home in Saugus where he lived with his family until he passed away.

On behalf of TGGF and its members, we salute Mr. Karl E. Petersen for his dedication and service to our freedom. You will never be forgotten.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Karl E. Petersen.jpg
#4454426 - 12/22/18 08:18 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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A 99-year-old Normandy World War II veteran has died and there's an appeal to invite people to his funeral.

Mr. Alfred Smith will be laid to rest at St Laurence and All Saints in Southend on Wednesday, December 19, and an appeal for mourners has since been launched.

Mr. Smith joined the Royal Army Service Corps during World War II, where he was evacuated from Dunkirk and went on to take part in the D-Day landings before being hospitalised by a shrapnel injury.

Mr. Smith then spent around six to seven months at a hospital in Brussels, where he was unable to stand or walk, before being transferred to a hospital in Stratford-Upon-Avon.

In 2015, Mr. Smith was awarded the Legion of d’Honneaur for his bravery- the highest honour a soldier can receive from the French Military. Mr. Smith also obtained the French and German Star, the Battle of Britain, the Defence Medal and War Medal 1939-1945.

He sadly passed away peacefully and will be honoured by his community. However, the local community are also invited to pay their respects to the war hero.

Next June marks the 75th anniversary of the D-Day Landings and the Battle of Normandy, which will be commemorated with a pilgrimage to the landing sites, one that Mr. Alfred planned to attend.

The event is due to be attended by veterans, serving military, as well as world leaders and politicians to pay tribute to those who fought and lost their lives in the conflict.

Michelle Turner-Everett, who runs the SSAFA Southend Lunch Club for veterans every Thursday, said: “It’s always incredibly sad to lose a treasured member of our local veteran community – but I hope that our send-off does him proud. "Aside from serving our country, Mr. Alfred was a wonderful man and we are lucky to have known him.”

His funeral service will be held at St Laurence and All Saints, Eastwood, on December 19 at 1.00pm – those wishing to pay their respects are welcome.

To any veteran in the local area wishing to attend the SSAFA Southend Lunch Club – get in touch with Michelle on: Chel.Turner-Everett@Essex.ssafa.org.uk

"Everyday is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Alfred Smith.jpg
#4454427 - 12/22/18 08:19 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: It's with great sadness that we learn the news that Harold Garrish, a survivor of Pearl Harbor has died. He was 100. Harold Garrish was a lieutenant commander in the Navy. According to Garrish’s family and friends, he led a full life after the war, including going to a ballroom dance class five days a week until he died, and skydiving when he was 97.

Thank you for your service and sacrifice to our nation.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest Generations Foundation

Attached Files Harold Garrish.jpg
#4454470 - 12/22/18 11:55 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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They will live a long time, these men of the South Pacific. They had an American quality. They, like their victories, will be remembered as long
as our generation lives. After that, like the men of the Confederacy, they
will become strangers. Longer and longer shadows will obcure them until
their Guadalcanal sounds distant on the ear like Shiloh and Valley Forge.

James Mitchener.... Tales of The South Pacific

Guadalcanal may already "sound distant on the ear", but while distance is
inevitable, inmortality is not.

#4456720 - 01/10/19 01:42 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: Its with great sadness, our nation lost a true American hero today Technical Sergeant Wilber (Bill) Brunger, proud member of the U.S. Army 289th Regiment, 75th Infantry Division. He was 95.

Born on 25 Apr 1923 in Denver, Colorado and graduated from South High School in Denver, Class of 1940, Mr. Brunger was a platoon Sgt and entered combat with Company B, 1st Battalion, 289th Regiment, 75th Infantry Division on 24 December 1944 during the Battle of the Bulge in the Ardennes-Alsace campaign.

Mr. Brunger significant military awards include the Combat Infantry Badge, Bronze Star with V and three clusters, Good Conduct, American Campaign European-African-Middle East with three battle stars, World War II Victory and French Campaign Croix de la Campagne Rhin et Danube.

With Respect, Honor, and Gratitude. Your sacrifice will never be forgotten Bill.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Brunger.jpg
#4456721 - 01/10/19 01:43 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: World War II veteran Mr. Roy Carter who survived the attack on Pearl Harbor — and was a candidate for the Congressional Medal of Honor for his actions that saved the lives of eight men on the USS Oklahoma that day — has died. Roy D. Carter was 98.

Mr. Carter, who retired from the U.S. Navy at the rank of lieutenant commander, escaped the sinking battleship USS Oklahoma after torpedoes tore through the heart of the ship Dec. 7, 1941.

Carter, like everyone else on board and in the Pacific fleet, said he had no clue about the incoming Japanese invasion.

While he was three decks below in the carpenter shop, he heard an alert: “Air attack! No Sh—! All hands man your battle stations. Set conditions zed!”

Said Carter, in a 2010 interview: “These were the last words we heard in the damage control section.”

Carter said his battle station was to lock down a watertight door with eight handles and a watertight hatch that could only be opened from the third deck.

Torpedoes hit while Carter locked the door, and the Oklahoma began tipping. He felt the thumps as the bombs barraged the middle of the ship.

“You could feel every impact,” he said. “If there was an explosion sound, I didn’t hear it because it was far from my mind.”

The attack took out the ship’s lights and communications, but the worst part, he recalled, was that by locking down the door he sealed eight quartermasters into their stations below him.

Knowing his only option was to leave, Carter began climbing out on his hands and knees as water and oil drenched him from head to foot. Somehow none of the doors above him had been sealed and he climbed out before the ship turned over and pulled him under.

“If I had taken one more minute and the men above me had closed the watertight hatches, I’d be dead,” Carter recalled.

He later discovered that the eight men below him were saved by his efforts. After the ship flipped, the quartermasters were trapped for 30 hours but were safe from that rising water and oil that the door kept out. They banged and hammered the hull and pipes to let people know they were inside and eventually they were cut free.

“I felt I saved eight guys that day,” Carter said.

All told, 429 souls — Navy men and Marines — lost their life on the USS Oklahoma in the attack.

“I don’t know the amount that were killed by torpedoes but there were a lot who starved to death or drowned while trapped,” he said.

While swimming to a nearby ship, high-altitude bombers dropped bombs within 100 yards but somehow none went off, he said.

Years later, Carter was reintroduced to one of the eight quartermasters, Bud Kennedy, who lived in Port Angeles until his death.

An Iowa boy, Carter was 18 years old when he joined the U.S. Navy. After boot camp, Carter and three buddies from Company 19 were assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was stationed in Bremerton.

Eventually Carter was promoted to senior damage control man in the rear portion of the ship.

Following his service on the Oklahoma, he served for three months on the USS Pelias, a submarine support craft, before being offered flight training.

Carter was commissioned as a naval aviator and served on active duty for seven years, mostly in Europe. He flew a B-24 that carried special weapons such as depth charges and torpedoes.

Following his duty, he stayed in the naval reserves for 13 years. Carter said he was most proud of receiving his flight wings and being commissioned as an officer.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Carter.jpg
#4456722 - 01/10/19 01:44 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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NEVER FORGET: ONE of the last remaining veterans of the Dunkirk evacuation has died aged 98.

Arthur Taylor, of Christchurch, was one of the 330,000 men rescued from the beaches of the French town after spending nearly two days being shot at and shelled by the Germans.

The RAF radio operator witnessed comrades stood next to him cut down by machine gun fire from Nazi planes.

He queued for 36 hours before getting on a ‘little ship’ that took him back to England in May 1940.

Arthur channelled the famous ‘Dunkirk spirit’ to rejoin the war effort and played his part in the crucial Battle of Britain three months later.

In his latter years he was heavily involved with the Association of Dunkirk Little Ships organisation and led the veterans’ parade in Dunkirk for the 75th anniversary of Operation Dynamo in 2015.

He also described in harrowing detail the evacuation to director Christopher Nolan, which helped him produce his 2017 movie Dunkirk. Arthur was a VIP guest for the film’s premiere in London.

After Dunkirk, he was then posted to RAF Hawkinge and RAF Lympne in Kent during the Battle of Britain where he worked as ground crew on Spitfires.

After the war he was demobbed but rejoined the RAF six months later as he couldn’t settle into civilian life. He served for 36 more years, including in Hong Kong, Kenya and Singapore during the Malayan Emergency in the 1950s.

Arthur had six children, 13 grandchildren and 12 great grandchildren.

On Behalf of TGGF and its members, we salute Mr. Taylor for his dedication and service to our freedom.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Taylor.jpg
#4456723 - 01/10/19 01:46 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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CHICAGO — World War II African-American fighter pilot John Lyle, a Tuskegee Airman, is dead at age 98.

Lyle's wife, Eunice, says he died Saturday at his home on Chicago's South Side. He had been battling prostate cancer.

The members of the nation's first black fighter squadron won acclaim for their aerial prowess and bravery, despite a military that imposed segregation on its African American recruits while respecting the rights of German prisoners. In 2007, President George W. Bush and Congress bestowed the Congressional Gold Medal on members of the squadron.

Lyle, who named his plane "Natalie" after his first wife, was credited with shooting down a German Messerschmitt.

After the war, Lyle worked for the Chicago Park District and founded a tree-trimming company.

In addition to his wife, Lyle is survived by three step-children.

Attached Files jack+lyle+antonio+perez+chicago+tribune.png
#4459552 - 02/01/19 07:34 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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WE REMEMBER: Its great sadness that we learn the news that World War II Heroe Mr. Fred Sutherland, one of two surviving members of Squadron 617, known later as the Dambusters has died.

The legendary unit dropped new high-tech "bouncing bombs" in 1943 on a German dam that was a key part of Adolf Hitler's industrial war machine.

In an interview last spring, Sutherland said that day stuck in his mind for 75 years.

"I was scared, I was really scared," he said. "But you can't say, 'Oh, I want to go home now.' You made up your mind and you can't let the crew down."

Fifty-three of the 133 airmen were killed. At least 1,300 others on the ground died from the bombings and subsequent floods.

Sutherland, a front gunner, was honoured for his bravery in April 2018 with a portrait by renowned painter Dan Llywelyn Hall. It was donated to the Bomber Command Museum of Canada in Nanton.

he Dambusters raid was considered a critical morale booster on the homefront, heavily damaging Hitler's dams. But the legacy was complicated due to the civilian deaths, and the fact that the war continued.

That wasn't lost on Sutherland, who was only 20 years old at the time of the raid.

"If you think something's right, you're going to fight for it," he said at the portrait unveiling. "I don't know the answer, but I know I'd do it again, even knowing what it was like."

In a later operation, Sutherland bailed out of a bomber and spent three months trying to escape Nazi-occupied Europe.

Following the war, he went on to study forestry. He then worked in that field in Rocky Mountain House, far south of his hometown of Peace River.

He was married to his wife Margaret for 73 years until her death in 2017. They had three children.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Sutherland.jpg
#4459553 - 02/01/19 07:34 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: It is with a heavy heart we learn the news that Mr. Albert A. Circelli, the man who prepared the table for the Japanese surrender in Tokyo Bay has passed away. He was 93

Born to Crescenzo and Antoinette Pastorelli Circelli on October 19, 1925, in Utica. Mr. Circelli joined the “CCC” Civilian Conservation Corps., right out of high school and subsequently began his work career with the Topper Beer Co, Balayntine Beer Co. and had a long and enjoyable career with the West End Brewery, until his retirement. Mr. Circelli was proud of his Italian Heritage and was an American Patriot through and through.

Mr. Circelli proudly served his country in the US Navy and was a veteran of World War II and the Korean War. He served aboard the USS Missouri and was present on the ship when they announced the Japanese would sign the surrender to America.

Mr. Circelli carried his military service with him, and every Veterans Day would always speak to the school children, about the significance of the war.

He married the love of his life Rose Marie Gaetano in 1948, a blessed union of 70 years. Mr. Circelli's life revolved around his family never missing one of his wife’s meals, and always attending his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren’s events. His stories will never be forgotten, from the bean fields and shacks to the streets of his beloved Utica, to the Military.

On behalf of TGGF and its members, we salute Mr. Circelli for his devotion and service to our great nation.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Circelli.jpg
#4459555 - 02/01/19 07:35 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: It is with great sadness we learned the news of Mr. Robert Anderson Sr, a top turret gunner on B-24 aircraft has gone before us. He was 93.

He was born in Chicago in 1925 and grew up in Harvey. His father died before he went to high school. While he was attending Thornton Township High School, he worked night jobs in factories because of the wartime manpower shortage.

Family members said Anderson was drafted soon after high school to join the Army Air Forces. He was a top turret gunner on B-24 aircraft with the Eighth Air Force based in Great Britain and flying bombing missions over Europe, his daughter said.

Anderson credited the GI Bill with making possible his education after high school and for his successful business career. He earned an undergraduate degree in science from DePaul University and then got an MBA from the University of Chicago.

On behalf of TGGF and its members, we salute you for your dedication and service to our freedom.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Anderson.jpg
#4459556 - 02/01/19 07:36 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: Saying ‘goodbye’ to a legend behind the chair. Hall of Fame barber and Marine from World War II Mr. Marty Buffano has passed away after battling cancer. He was 92.

In this fast-paced ever-changing world, a world that shows no signs of slowing down, there is one place on Midlothian Turnpike where you'll find consistency, serenity and a whole lot of style.

92-year-old Marty Bufano has been cutting hair since FDR lived in the White House. Marty learned the trade from an old barber in his hometown of Scranton in 1938.

“I was 13 years old when I became an apprentice,” says Marty. “I looked at him and said, ‘Angelo, What is an apprentice?’”

Then Uncle Sam beckoned at the outbreak of WWII.

“Then when I was 17 I joined the Marines. I wanted to be a Marine.” During the war Marty cut his fellow Marine’s hair in the South Pacific.

“Even then I was fussy about how I cut their hair. But It really didn’t matter but That is just me,” says Marty.

After the war Marty shaped quite a reputation in 1961 when he was named National Barber of the Year. To this day, Marty prefers the Roffler technique using a straight razor instead of scissors.

Customer Bill Lyle appreciates Marty’s attention to detail. “Next thing I know he grabs a razor and I thought ‘Wow. That is cool.”

Marty does not believe in a quick haircut. Bill who is a 30-year customer always allots an hour with Marty.

“It is kind of like visiting a friend and getting a haircut on the side,” says Marty.

Marty prefers the traditional looking cut unlike one particular world leader.

“You know I think has the goofiest haircut of all? This guy from North Korea. Oh God. He must think he looks cute with that haircut. It’s so bad.”

This former U.S. Marine is making up for lost time. This senior veteran decided he needed a new look. Marty got U.S. Marine tattoos on both arms. His tattoo obsession hasn’t stopped.

Marty is survived by his wife, four children, several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

"Every Day is Memorial Day
The Greatest Gnerations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Buffano.jpg
#4459559 - 02/01/19 07:41 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Thanks for posting these new entries F4U. Those men are certainly very special and inspiring.


“Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And if you gaze long enough into an abyss, the abyss will gaze back into you.”
#4459562 - 02/01/19 07:53 PM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Yes F4 thank you very moving stories..Made my eyes a bit damp..I'm not ashamed to admit to that..


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#4460986 - 02/12/19 11:06 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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AMERICA REMEMBERS: Its with great sadness, we learn the news that Mr. David B. Evans, a World War II veteran of famous battle of Kasserine Pass has died. He was 98.

Evans enlisted in the Army on his 23 birthday — March 30, 1942. After attending basic training in Massachusetts, he joined the 9th Infantry Regiment at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

On Christmas Eve 1942, he arrived in North Africa at Casablanca. A few weeks later he found himself an escort for President Franklin D. Roosevelt as he headed to the Casablanca Conference, where he would announce that the Western Allies would accept nothing less than “unconditional surrender” from the Axis Powers.

Following the conference, Evans fought in the Tunisian Campaign from February to May of 1943, and actively participated in the disastrous battle at Kasserine Pass, where he was injured and sent to Italy to recover.

For most people, June 6, 1944, is D-Day, the beginning of the invasion of Normandy and the Western Allied effort to liberate mainland Europe from Nazi Germany.

For Evans, it was the day he found out he would be sent back to the U.S. after 18 months serving overseas in World War II. He spent the rest of his service in the South, serving, much to his dismay, in Brooklyn, Miss., not Brooklyn, N.Y. He was honorably discharged as a staff sergeant.

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest Generations Foundation
Web: www.TGGF.org

Attached Files Evans.jpg
#4460999 - 02/12/19 11:36 AM Re: The Passing of The Greatest Generation. [Re: F4UDash4]  
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Whenever I think of Kasserine Pass I think of the movie "Patton". Sure, at the time the battle was as tactical victory for the Germans and it was played up in both the Allied and Axis press but in retrospect that battle had no bearing on the outcome of the war in Europe or even the campaign in North Africa.


“Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And if you gaze long enough into an abyss, the abyss will gaze back into you.”
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