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#4368912 - 07/12/17 10:38 PM (Cold) War stories...  
Joined: Sep 2001
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Dart Offline
Measured in Llamathrusts
Dart  Offline
Measured in Llamathrusts
Lifer

Joined: Sep 2001
Posts: 24,589
Alabaster, AL USA
One of the few good things about Facebook is interacting with today's troops and the impacts of all the leaps in technology within a very short time. Some of them just are in awe of how analog things were "back in the day." Heck, I remember cranking out copies of target lists on a mimeograph machine (if I was lucky), or by using stacks of carbon paper and pressing REALLY hard.

Anyhow, a lot of veterans do a lot of "puffery" stories of their service, particularly those who served during the Cold War, and it sort of irritates me. The mission was real, the training was tough, and causalities happened in peacetime for 99% of us. Hell, Desert Storm wasn't all that, to be honest, when compared to OIF, OEF, or any of the current "O" campaigns. I'm not ashamed of my service in the least, even if it wasn't blood-and-guts action, and revel in the mundane things that happened.

Here's a little bit I put on Facebook to bring people to ground a bit:

Long ago, when Soviets walked the Earth and people thought Germany was so great we actually needed two of them, the USA used to send Infantrymen in big aluminum boxes with tracks on the sides of them called M113 APC’s to make sure nobody tried to reunite them. Weird, right?

The thing about said aluminum boxes is that the fear of aircraft making them into slag meant that all of the hatches were always open, including this great big one in the top rear through which the passengers would stand in order to see said aircraft. It was never overtly stated, but rather implied, that should a hostile aircraft threaten the M113 the occupants would show that most common form of valor, meaning that they would jump out of it and run as far and as fast away as possible from it.

In the summertime it made for a fine, if bumpy, ride. In Winter, however, standing up in a moving track was an exercise in cold weather training that had to be experienced to be appreciated, and since the whole thing was metal, sitting inside was like cozing up inside of an ice box.

There was a heater for the M113, but since all the hatches were always open the most it could do was make a little noise before breaking down out of frustration. In fact, I don’t recall ever seeing an Infantry M113 with a working heater, each having been taken out for repair, given up on, and strapped back in place, disconnected.

As a young Private I was of course the Platoon Forward Observer (and my own RTO!), and had taken an interest in the trigger mittens (with liners) they had issued me. It even came with a long string one could thread through one’s sleeves and to each one, assuring they wouldn’t get lost. During my first winter exercise that included long “road marches” in the back of an open M113 I decided to put them to the test.

My brothers-in-arms, bemused that I was both an Artilleryman and a Private, took delight in my mittens, singing “Hey little kitten, look who found his mittens,” and saying other such encouraging words that highlighted my foresight, intelligence, and downright spectacular fashion sense.

Our Second Lieutenant Platoon Leader smirked a bit, but said nothing.

A half hour stretched to one, than two, and I saw the Platoon Sergeant on the bench below reach into a bag and stealthily put something on his hands. Fifteen minutes later the Track Commander had his on, too. The driver was next, and finally the LT’s RTO caught on.

At a brief halt the Lieutenant began banging his black gloved hands together, as while they too were “with liner,” they were insufficient in keeping his fingers from stiffening up. The alcohol pen was difficult to hold against the acetate covered map, you see, and he looked about to see how the rest of us were doing to alleviate this problem.

“You’re all wearing mittens,” he muttered, as if surprised.

“Hell yeah, sir,” the Platoon Sergeant said, “it’s cold as f**k. That’s why they issue them to us.”

What's your "average" service story?


Last edited by Dart; 07/12/17 10:39 PM.

The opinions of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

More dumb stuff at http://www.darts-page.com

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#4368925 - 07/12/17 11:40 PM Re: (Cold) War stories... [Re: Dart]  
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Fitz505 Offline
Member
Fitz505  Offline
Member

Joined: Mar 2005
Posts: 245
Upstate NY
Time: Fall of 1966
Place: Fort Knox Kentucky

I was training to be an 11Echo (armor crewman). We were on an over night move and had stopped for a break. I was standing radio watch sitting in the tank commanders seat.
This was in the M48A3 Patton with the 50 cal mounted in a small cupola. Out of boredom, i started playing with the traversing control and the barrel of the 50, knocked my platoon sgt. (he was my TC), whom I didn't
know was standing there, off the side of the tank, where he landed on the platoon leader, who had just walked up to talk to him. Neither one was serious hurt, but as tank treads tend to create a lot of mud when the ground is wet, they were a bit of mess to say the least.
As neither one was very popular in the platoon, I became an instant hero. Of course my life also became somewhat unpleasant for the rest of my training cycle.

Fitz

#4368959 - 07/13/17 11:01 AM Re: (Cold) War stories... [Re: Dart]  
Joined: Sep 2002
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531 Ghost Offline
USMC
531 Ghost  Offline
USMC
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Joined: Sep 2002
Posts: 11,249
Elizabeth City NC
Some that stick out...

West Pac 79/80 USS Coral Sea VMFA 531

We were doing a maintenance turn near the round down. As we were turning, a (white) Russian "fishing" boat kept getting closer, and closer to our ships stern. When in range, we put the engine into afterburner and threw cans of oil (MIL-L-23699) into the exhaust. At the time, MIL-L-23699 was kind of an orange color. We launched the first can, and BULLSEYE! We'd hit the bow of the Russian "fishing" ship. We'd thought, hey, that was cool, let's do it again! Well, about three cans later we get a call over the radio to shut it down and come see the AIRBOSS. AH CRAP! The AIRBOSS proceeded to chew, ream... our butts yelling/asking if we were trying to cause an international incident. To which we said, no, we (one of the two fighter squadrons on board) were responsible for protecting the ship and the "fishing" ship was a bit too close for comfort. He kind of smirked and told us to knock it off and get the testing done and the aircraft in an up/up status. When we'd got back to the aircraft, the "fishing" ship was *poof* gone.

West Pac 79/80 USS Coral Sea VMFA 531

The Admiral:
We were minding our own business washing an aircraft. I'd pulled on the hose to get it positioned better. When I did, it apparently squirt some guy running by with a Marine in tow. He stopped. On my hose. Impeding the already slow/weak pressure we had. At that point, I told him to get off the hose so we could get some work done! "Do you know who I am?" he said. Nope, now get off the hose. Again, "Do you know who I am?" And again we replied nope. To which he replied, you'll know who I am by the end of the day. A few hours later we were called into the Ready Room to have a "meeting" with our CO. He asked us if we knew who he (the guy running on the flight deck) was. Again, we said no sir nor did he tell us. "Well gents, that was/is the Admiral, in charge of all you see here. Let me just say, keep up the good work, but, when he's running on the deck, steer clear. I don't need another butt chewing like that, again. Aye Sir!


1978 29 Palms CAX VMFA 531

I was assigned to packing chutes that day. It was somewhat of a windy day. I pushed my B4 stand to the back of the aircraft. I then went to the pilots cockpit and put the drag chute handle down. This, un-locks the D ring on the chute, to the aircraft, allowing the chute door (106) to close, and latch once the T handle is pulled. I then proceeded to climb up the B4 stand (it's on four casters that I didn't lock). I took the shroud lines in my hand and began packing the chute. Well, the wind picked up blossoming the chute! I was then holding onto the chute, standing on the B4 stand rolling down the flight line! Fun stuff!


Originally Posted by Abraham Lincoln
America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves.


#4368961 - 07/13/17 11:24 AM Re: (Cold) War stories... [Re: Dart]  
Joined: Sep 2002
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531 Ghost Offline
USMC
531 Ghost  Offline
USMC
Veteran

Joined: Sep 2002
Posts: 11,249
Elizabeth City NC
And then, post 79/80 West Pac:

[img]https://scontent-atl3-1.xx.fbcdn.ne...d76cba94b82cc53dffa5485e&oe=59C3A1A3[/img]

As I remember, he (the guy in the middle) collected $30.00 dollars from the squadron to eat the bird. He had to hold it down for 30 minutes before he could keep the cash. Our F/L shack was FILLED with people waiting for the first bite. I sat right across the desk from him. When he took the first bite, most of the squadron had left the building, except F/L. He got down to the last leg, picked his teeth with it and put it on his plate. We made him eat that too. He got about 20 minutes into it. He was all kinds of green. Lt Flood walked into the line shack and asked where the bird went. We told him. HE WHAT?! Lt Flood ordered him to puke. When told he still had 10 minutes Lt Flood told him that he'd give him the $30.00. With that, he went outside an puked up the bird.


Originally Posted by Abraham Lincoln
America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves.


#4368969 - 07/13/17 01:28 PM Re: (Cold) War stories... [Re: Dart]  
Joined: Jan 2001
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Airdrop01 Offline
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Airdrop01  Offline
Chief Pheasant Controller
Hotshot

Joined: Jan 2001
Posts: 5,562
Kansas, USA
There I was, in Warsaw. Spring of 1981. I in my "American blue jeans" and she in her "Eastern bloc babushka" wear......

biggrin :

doesshe


"For I know the plans that I have for you," declares the Lord, "plans for welfare and not for calamity to give you a future and a hope." Jeremiah 29:11

Blessed are you when people insult you and persecute you, and falsely say all kinds of evil against you because of Me. Matthew 5:11

Indeed we call blessed those who have persevered. You have heard of the perseverance of Job, and you have seen the purpose of the Lord, because “the Lord is compassionate and merciful. James 5:11
#4368974 - 07/13/17 02:08 PM Re: (Cold) War stories... [Re: Dart]  
Joined: Apr 2001
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PanzerMeyer Online centaurian
Pro-Consul of Florida
PanzerMeyer  Online Centaurian
Pro-Consul of Florida
King Crimson - SimHQ's Top Poster

Joined: Apr 2001
Posts: 112,607
Miami, FL USA
Great stories guys. I was never in the military and I would have been too young anyway to have served during the Cold War so I have no cool funny stories to share. biggrin


“Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And if you gaze long enough into an abyss, the abyss will gaze back into you.”
#4368977 - 07/13/17 02:35 PM Re: (Cold) War stories... [Re: Dart]  
Joined: Sep 2000
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sinner6 Offline
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sinner6  Offline
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Posts: 3,269
Fort Worth,TX
Dart, your story sure brings back memories. I drove an M577 (the command version of the 113). That heater was quite a thing. We had one old gnarly Staff Sgt. who could get them to either a) shoot a 10 foot blue flame at which point the term 'heater' was understating things quite alot. OR b) the thing would shoot great billowing clouds of diesel smoke (the thing ran off the same fuel as the motor). Neither option allowed for the crew to breath.

We also had 'mogas burners' but only officers ever got to stand in the 3 foot circle of warmth provided by one of these.

Driving that damn thing in the cold was terrible, since the engine sucked air through the driver hatch and your hand would practically freeze to the laterals.

The belly of the thing was always full of a mix of water, oil, coolant and mud, and woe to the stupid sucker who ever turned on the bilge pump. This would immediately spray said concoction all over the side of the vehicle and ground, where it made quite a mess. No, the solution to cleaning the bilge was to get under the vehicle with about 10 drip pans ready, and unscrew the 50 pound belly plate, where once the water tight seal was broken, the poor sucker under the thing got showered in mess as he tried to catch it in the drip pans.

Fun stuff.


Last edited by sinner6; 07/13/17 02:36 PM.

Steam: Sinner6
Uplay: Sinner76028
MWO: Sinner6
#4368979 - 07/13/17 02:50 PM Re: (Cold) War stories... [Re: Dart]  
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Suicidal_6 Offline
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Suicidal_6  Offline
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Posts: 2,615
Gulfport
Late spring 1989, South Korea. I was the driver of an M-113A3. Typical field training exercise. We head down to the motor pool and get everything loaded up, then comes the briefing and order of march. Eventually we get started on the long, slow drive through towns not designed to accommodate armored vehicles. A few hours into the trip, the CO decides to have a little drill. The dismounts are going to attack this barn out in a field. The tracks face the target building to provide support and the dismounts deploy. Over the next 30 minutes or so I chit chat back and forth with the squad leader over the headsets ( they happened to work this time), and watch the show. Finally it's over and the crunchies are back on board. We are ready to roll, but it takes another 30 minutes or so for the company to get moving. A couple of hours down the road we finally leave the hard ball for some off road fun. The terrain was pretty rough, but I must admit it was pretty fun to be the driver. We eventually get to our position for the night, and the squad leader dismounts to ground guide. He quickly comes up to the front of the track and motions for me to dismount, so I do. He asks me; " when did they attach the trailer"? I said; " what trailer"? We went to the back and the storage boxes on both sides of the M-113 were trashed from the trailer. Not quite sure how the squad leader didn't notice someone hooking up a trailer to our track, but oh well. If I had known about the trailer I would have driven slower and more carefully.

During our little stop for the attack on the barn, the 1st sergeant had his driver attach a small trailer to my track, but they forgot to tell us somehow. I didn't get any grief over it because I didn't know it was there, and of course the 1SGT and his driver didn't get any flack either.


_ _ ______________________ _ _

S6
#4368996 - 07/13/17 03:55 PM Re: (Cold) War stories... [Re: Dart]  
Joined: Sep 2001
Posts: 24,589
Dart Offline
Measured in Llamathrusts
Dart  Offline
Measured in Llamathrusts
Lifer

Joined: Sep 2001
Posts: 24,589
Alabaster, AL USA
I once saw a guy in a convertible cussing out a crew in an M113 for being so slow and generally just being Americans. He was to their left. The driver accidentally hit the bilge pump switch and filled his car with all the goodness under the floor plates. They actually got into a little trouble for that, but totally worth it.

Here's another tale:

All this thinking about Germany has brought back a lot of memories of the Cold War, and the Story of the Mittens lead to recalling The Treehouse OP.

Being brand new to a unit, especially as an FO to an Infantry one as a OPCON “loaner” means one is an unknown quantity and can’t be trusted. If one is going to do things that are a bit off the books, it’s best not to gamble and have them around to see.

We were in one of our positions marked with an additional red circle in the Top Secret Battle Book on the border with the DDR (I got grins when I asked if it meant this is where we were supposed to die here), and were to be there for two days and a night.

The Platoon Sergeant tells me to offset from the unit and find a good Observation Post and radio back its location and stay there until he came to fetch me. “Make sure it’s well concealed and out of sight of us. Artillery is important and we need you to be able to call for fire if we get hit.”

I might have been a young Private, but I was also an Army brat. I know when they’re trying to ditch the New Kid. Fine.

Walking the terrain outside of a small village I notice that it was all pretty much the same, with no real advantages on the rolling terrain. I looked back at the town and noticed that in a back yard was a very cool looking tree house. This wasn’t your standard American scrap wood box nailed to a tree sort of thing, but a German one. I’ve seen actual houses with less attention to craftsmanship.

Well, that was that. I knock on the door to the house and in my GI German say “Bitte, canst Ich sitz in das Lufthouse?” Literally, “can I sit in your air house?” To show I wasn’t a nut, I added “Ich bien ein Americanish Soldaten mit das canonen,” as if the uniform, the field gear including a PRC-77 in rucksack, binoculars hanging around my neck, and M16A1 rifle didn’t clue that in.

The nice lady was going to say no, but her kids (a boy about nine and a girl about seven) were delighted at the idea of having a pet Forward Observer in their back yard and begged her to say yes.
It was more fancy inside than outside, about ten feet square, with varnished wood floors and walls, shutters on the windows, and decent furniture of a table and three kid sized chairs. Getting an eight digit grid location was easy – the house was on the map – and I called it in and said I was in good position.

I didn’t lie – I had a great view of the approaches from the East!

The boy shows up a little while later and I share and MRE with him, but it was Winter and there wasn’t any heat, and his Mom called for him to come inside. About an hour later, Dad shows up, climbing into the treehouse with a bemused look on his face. I thank him as best I can, show him my gear, and he says he was an Infantryman in the Bundeswehr in a little better English than I had German. He left and came back with a little kerosene heater, a bunch of blankets, and a chair fit for an adult (I didn’t want to sit in the kid’s chairs and was putting my butt on the floor.

A little after dark he comes back and says “Mochen sie Dusche?“ Do I want a shower? Hell yes, I want a shower. I take all my gear except the radio and binoculars into the house, as the kids weren’t going to sleep and came out all bundled up. I put them on watch (though I did turn the radio off after checking in).

So I go into the house, take a quick, if hot, shower, shave, and resume my post. I awarded each of the kids a PFC rank from my collar for duty to the nation.

The next day saw breakfast delivered, and with it some more creature comforts. And a thermos carafe of coffee.

Meanwhile, the Infantry, no doubt casting me into the bushes to make a few trips to a gausthouse and enjoy a very forbidden beer or two, began to question their tactics. They called me up and asked for my position again with an edge of concern in their voice. I gave it to them and said I had a great OP and they should let me know when to come back.

It turns out the FSO had come out to check on me and was very displeased over the matter, and I saw him and the Infantry Company Commander pulling up in a jeep on the road below my nest, get out, and lay the map on the hood.

“He said he was here,” says the Captain.

“Damned Privates,” muttered the 1SG, who was driving.

“I’m right here,” I called out from my treehouse window.

“DON’T MOVE, PRIVATE!” they almost simultaneously yelled.

Hopping the nice little fence, they discovered their poor abused Private left to the woods without so much as a sleeping bag living in a little heated house, showered, shaved, a couple of empty beer bottles, and a nice little assortment of bread and cold cuts laid out on a table, feet propped up, wrapped up in blankets and holding a hot cup of coffee in one hand and a lit cigarette in another.

I figured I was so busted that I didn’t even bother to stand when they entered.

“Good morning, sirs, First Sergeant, would you like some coffee or a roll?”

Naturally they started laughing, had me brief the position, and made me pack it up. I left my terrain sketch and 50 DM on top of the blankets after I folded them, as well as a short note that said “Danke fur Alles.”

I didn’t get into any trouble for that, but then again, they never let me offset from the unit again, either.

Last edited by Dart; 07/13/17 03:57 PM.

The opinions of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

More dumb stuff at http://www.darts-page.com

From Laser:
"The forum is the place where combat (real time) flight simulator fans come to play turn based strategy combat."
#4369028 - 07/13/17 05:58 PM Re: (Cold) War stories... [Re: Dart]  
Joined: Dec 2003
Posts: 11,220
MarkG Offline
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MarkG  Offline
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Joined: Dec 2003
Posts: 11,220
The Bayou
Good stories, fellas. thumbsup That first one replaced my paperbook nightcap and now there's more. I hope they continue...



The rusty wire that holds the cork that keeps the anger in
Gives way and suddenly it’s day again
The sun is in the east
Even though the day is done
Two suns in the sunset, hmph
Could be the human race is run
#4369085 - 07/13/17 10:08 PM Re: (Cold) War stories... [Re: Dart]  
Joined: Jan 2001
Posts: 9,426
KraziKanuK Online content
Hotshot
KraziKanuK  Online Content
Hotshot

Joined: Jan 2001
Posts: 9,426
Ottawa Canada
Was at the range one day for target practice. In the morning my platoon shot and in the afternoon we worked the butts and the other platoon shot.

The other platoon was from the infantry while we were a signals platoon;.

The targets were lollypops so the 4' targets were down. When the 4' targets were down, a metal flag would show. Hear this noise of metal hitting metal and then bombarded with shrapnel down my right arm and neck. F'in infantryman missed his lollypop by 3 targets. banghead Learned a few new cuss word from the butt sarg that day as he took most of the shrapnel. The infantryman had hit the metal Y holding the metal flag on the 4'.

Sent off to be checked out and got the rest of the afternoon off. Now it was at least 80F that day. As you all know the military doesn't like idle hands so was sent on KP duty peeling potatoes in this stone building - nice and cool. thumbsup Got chewed out for peeling to many potatoes. smile

The rifle was the FNC1A1. Iirc the range was 100yds.


There was only 16 squadrons of RAF fighters that used 100 octane during the BoB.
The Fw190A could not fly with the outer cannon removed.
There was no Fw190A-8s flying with the JGs in 1945.
#4369086 - 07/13/17 10:12 PM Re: (Cold) War stories... [Re: Dart]  
Joined: Jan 2007
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DaveP63 Offline
Member
DaveP63  Offline
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Posts: 1,816
Indiana, USA
Man, when I get a little time I'll jot down a few! Keep 'em coming guys, I love it!


i5-4460@3.2ghz, 16GB Ram, Gigabyte GTX1050Ti 4GB, 2TB HDD, 500GB SDD
#4369321 - 07/15/17 10:33 AM Re: (Cold) War stories... [Re: Dart]  
Joined: Jan 2007
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DaveP63 Offline
Member
DaveP63  Offline
Member

Joined: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,816
Indiana, USA
Early 80"s we were deployed to Norway with our jets. There was a four ship departing out of a different field than we were deployed to (I'm sure to familiarize them with dispersal fields/alternate landing sites). Anyway, Major "Mike" was the navigator in the lead F-4 and his pilot was "Ron O" who was a senior Major and prior Navy. They take off on a runway oriented east/west so they are blasting towards unfriendly airspace at a fair rate of knots since the take off heading easterly. "Mike" is supposed to call the turn to clear unfriendly skies. "Ron O" is doing math in his head and decides to prompt "Mike" to call the
turn before they violate Soviet airspace. All he gets back on the intercom is "Ummmm". So "Ron O" call a turn to a more friendly direction, later math revealed they were within 30 seconds of going where they didn't want to go. It seems that "Mike" had dropped his maps bag and didn't want to say anything until he'd figured out how to recover them from next to the seat. (Pro tip, sometimes if you invert it will come out along with pencils, pens, cigarette butts and all other types of trash) "Mike" was from that point forward assigned the call sign "Ferdinand". As in Ferdinand Magellan.


i5-4460@3.2ghz, 16GB Ram, Gigabyte GTX1050Ti 4GB, 2TB HDD, 500GB SDD
#4369355 - 07/15/17 03:43 PM Re: (Cold) War stories... [Re: Dart]  
Joined: Dec 2000
Posts: 22,388
letterboy1 Offline
(Heterosexual)Tchaikovsky Ballet Fan
letterboy1  Offline
(Heterosexual)Tchaikovsky Ballet Fan
Lifer

Joined: Dec 2000
Posts: 22,388
Columbus, GA USA
I was stationed in Wuerzburg, Germany from Dec 85 until Dec 87. My fondest memories are of my first ever drum set and jamming with some other guys who were also stationed at the 123rd Signal Bn, 3rd ID. Here you only see me and Keith on guitar. We were practicing in the motorpool where I serviced generators, so we were literally a "garage band." Our one and only gig was performing for my company when our commander took us on a river boat cruise on the Main river.

Oh, for any drummers wondering why I left the bottom heads off from my rack and floor toms - I hadn't learned yet how to properly tune them. biggrin

Attached Files Me_with_1st_Tama.jpg

The issue is not p*ssy. The issue is monkey.
#4369389 - 07/15/17 08:52 PM Re: (Cold) War stories... [Re: Dart]  
Joined: Mar 2001
Posts: 16,204
Nixer Online cool
Scaliwag and Survivor
Nixer  Online Cool
Scaliwag and Survivor
Veteran

Joined: Mar 2001
Posts: 16,204
Living with the Trees
Late 70's out in the West TX, NM desert. We had a platoon leader who wasn't that swift. He was lost (not that hard to do in the desert pre-gps). The troop's CO asked the guy where he was.

The 2LT says "See that cloud shaped like a horse... well I am right under it!"

He didn't last much longer before he just didn't show up anymore. POOF! Gone.



"There's a sucker born every minute."
Phineas Taylor Barnum


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