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#4289985 - 08/23/16 10:38 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Fullofit Offline
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Ajax, ON
Carrick, is the nurse pretty at least?


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4290036 - 08/24/16 04:24 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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#4290349 - 08/24/16 11:35 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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MFair Offline
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August 24, 1916
Furnes aerodrome

Flight Sub-Lt. Bolitho was feeling rather cocky. 24 missions and 2 confirmed kills. Then returning from an uneventfull escort mission over the lines he landed and while bounding down the runway let his port wing dip hitting the ground. The light Nieport promptly flipped over sending the young Lt. To the hospital for 12 days. Off to see the nurses, that is if Carrick has left any!


Never approach a bull from the front, a horse from the rear or a fool from either end.
BOC Member since....I can't remember!
#4290375 - 08/25/16 01:16 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Fullofit Offline
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Ajax, ON
Looks like he's willing to share all these beauties. biggrin


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4290669 - 08/26/16 02:59 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Raine Offline
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MFair, good to see you here!

Sgt Alfred Keers gets a surprise promotion, and makes a mess of his first day at his new home. He's out for six days.

We were grounded by foul weather from the 17th to the 20th of April 1916. I went with Jeff Anderto into St-Omer most days, but there was little to do. The town had some cafs and restaurants, but many were reserved for officers. There were a number of hospitals, both for men and animals, and there were headquarters, of course. We visited the building that had been until recently Gen Haigs headquarters. I expected something more imposing.

One day we got terribly lost and stopped to ask directions of a woman who was sweeping the pavement outside her home. She generously invited us in and insisted we drink coffee with her and her husband, who was some sort of town official. We struggled to communicate but found the French very friendly and accommodating. They are also very religious compared to us, crossing themselves and praying before eating. Little shrines to the Virgin or some saint seem to adorn every room. That said, there is a certain sort of woman here who is doing a roaring trade in town. The Army turns a blind eye to it all. In fact, their main concern is that officers and other ranks should avoid using the same establishments!

I was up twice on the 21st, the morning flight a distant patrol over the lines several miles past Thlus. The cloud was heavy and we saw nothing. On days like that the Fee is the coldest machine you can fly, as there is no protection from the elements and no heat from the engine, which is behind you. We flew a second distant patrol over Haubourdin in the late afternoon, but again we saw nothing. Mr Whieldon was on leave for a few days, so my observer was Lieut Pearson.

The rain returned on the 22nd, but the day was not without excitement. After lunch, the CO called for me. I reported to his office and saluted smartly, wondering what Id done. Instead putting me through the facings, he invited me to take a seat.

Youve had quite a start to your service, he began. It was not quite two months since Id arrived here.

I did my best as duty sergeant, sir, I said, referring to the punishment duty the major had given me for looping a Fee on my arrival at Clairmarais.

Well, he said, if youre to be sorted out next time, well have to make you duty officer, Mr. Keers.
It took a moment before I realised what hed said. Officer?

You are getting a commission. It should be gazetted tomorrow. Let me be the first to congratulate Second Lieutenant Keers. The major stood and offered his hand. I reciprocated and he motioned that we should sit back down.

Its a difficult thing to serve as an officer in a unit where you were an NCO, so youre to transfer tomorrow to 29 Squadron at Abeele theyre flying DeHavillands. That will give you a fresh start in your new role. He had something else. Major Wilson had laid claim to an officers service dress tunic with RFC badges. It already had the lonely Bath stars of a subaltern on the sleeve. He said he wished me more luck that the tunics previous owner, and suggested it would do me until I could get properly kitted out. There were no breeches. Id have to pick those up in St-Omer.

I was slated for the early patrol in the morning, and got permission to keep my sergeants stripes up until after the flight was done. As it happened, our original patrol was scrubbed and we were dispatched to Coudekerque to hunt for some reported intruders. We took off at six, myself and Mr Pearson behind Captain Paget-Gravess machine and Lieut Grangers.

I was the first to spot them, two silver-white two-seaters dodging eastward among thick clouds. I signalled and gave chase. We became separated in the clouds and I emerged from a wall of cumulus directly below an Aviatik. Mr Pearson fired. We were scarcely fifty yards away. The Hun machine shed a wing and began tumbling earthward. Mr. Pearson pointed. A second Hun was just ahead, probably five hundred yards away. We quickly got under it and within seconds it broke up in the air. Unfortunately both Huns fell over the lines and were not seen, so we were denied the victories. It would have been a great send-off.

I arrived at Abeele, near Ypres, just before lunch, wearing a dead mans tunic and NCOs breeches. The CO, Major Dawes, seemed a very decent sort, and introduced me to a few fellows whose names did not stick. I learned I was to fly a two oclock on a familiarisation jaunt to the lines near Armentires. I had time for only a twenty minute circuit on the DH2 before possibly going into action!

I wasted no time in getting the machine up. It was tiny and light compared to the Fee, and if possible, it was even colder. By the time I put the machine down there was no sensation in my hands.

Should I be concerned, I wondered? Id been assigned to fly alongside two sergeant-pilots. Sergeants Noakes and Thomas were first-rate men, but I questioned if Id been sent around to the service entrance by the officers. The thought disturbed me, but I shook it off. It was a beautiful afternoon and I guided the nimble little pusher into the air and took my position on Sergeant Noakess wing. He would lead this patrol.

My experience did not last long. Two minutes after takeoff the Gnme began to miss badly. I gave Sgt Noakes the wash-out signal and began to glide down. I had enough altitude to turn back and gingerly brought the machine around, keeping the nose well down. The motor died and I glided in. The field was still 300 yards off and I had a fence to clear. I was coming in too low. Suddenly and without warning the left wing dipped as the machine stalled. I nearly recovered but it was too late. There was a loud snapping of splintered wood as the left wingtip touched ground and the undercarriage crumpled. The machine spun around on the broken wing and fell to the right. The right wings shattered and the motor shifted on its mounting. I hit the ground hard and knew immediately that Id done something to my back.

The DH2 was a complete write-off. It had arrived in France the day before. At least I spun the machine so that the motor didnt fly forward and decapitate me, I thought. Pain shot down my right leg and up into my neck.

Id made a right mess of this job.


"A second Hun was just ahead, probably five hundred yards away."


#4290722 - 08/26/16 10:20 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Hasse Offline
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Wow, so much has happened here in the past weeks! I confess I haven't really flown any missions with August Ege recently, but I hope to continue this DID too in the near future. The other DID is now in such a fascinating situation with the end of the war approaching that I've spent my flying time there with Albrecht Niemann, and then there was that small Olympics event in Brazil, which also caught my attention.

Anyway, excellent reports and congrats to Mr. Keers on his promotion! Is he now a proper gentleman? smile


"Upon my word I've had as much excitement on a car as in the air, especially since the R.F.C. have had women drivers."

James McCudden, Five Years in the Royal Flying Corps
#4290895 - 08/26/16 10:11 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Fullofit Offline
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Ajax, ON
We're running out of nurses very quickly.


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4291076 - 08/27/16 10:05 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
Joined: Jun 2014
Posts: 2,420
Banjoman Offline
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Antigua, Guatemala
Hello guys, this is the first I've been able to check in. It looks like you've been real busy in my absence. I hope to be up and flying in a couple of days, somehow I have to find an ethernet cable here in Antigua. Anyway, I've sure missed reading the reports.


Member and provider of banjo music for the Illustrious BOC
#4291400 - 08/29/16 10:31 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
Joined: Nov 2014
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Fullofit Offline
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Ajax, ON
Welcome back Banjoman. How are the new digs? I'm still doing double-takes when I look at the location in your sig. I've just started my vacation. 2 weeks on Fuerteventura. I've flown ahead, so I won't miss any of the score reporting.


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4292260 - 08/31/16 08:01 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
Joined: Jul 2014
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Raine Offline
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New Brunswick, Canada
Great to hear from you, Banjoman!

2Lt Keers is setting squadron records at No 29. Just not the right kind of records...

Stand straight while Im talking to you, Mr. Keers! Id never seen an officer that colour of purple. Major Dawes had transformed from the decent gentleman Id met scarcely a week ago into a banshee, spraying spittle and grimacing fiercely.

You have done more bloody damage to this squadron than any Hun alive! Do you realise that, Mr. Keers? Do you, hey? I was afraid he was about to spit out something hed need later. What in the name of all thats holy were you trying to accomplish today?

Ah well, its a long story. So lets begin eight days ago when I wrecked my first DH2 stalling after my first patrol as a subaltern with 29 Squadron.

...

Except for the back pain, Id walked away scot-free from a dreadfully heavy smash-up. I therefore spent my first week at Abeele as duty officer for the week until cleared for flying. This was a pleasant change, as Id only been duty NCO before. In addition to the tasks Id become used to, I got to sleep on a tiny cot in the squadron officer in order to man the telephone at night. I also got to close the NCOs mess, which brought me more than my share of rude but muttered comment. When Id been in the NCOs mess at Clairmarais, wed given nicknames to each of the officers. Now that I was an officer I was keen to discover if Id been graced with such a name, and if so what. Deadeye or Killer Alf would be nice, I thought. But it was one night as I called for everyone to leave the NCOs mess that I overheard my new nom de guerre Splinters.

My DH2 took the better part of that week to repair, needing new wings, undercarriage, propeller, engine mounts, two longerons, and nacelle ribs, not to mention miscellaneous wires and bits.

Finally on 30th August, I was given permission to fly again. That morning we headed to Armentieres for an offensive patrol. Again I was led by a sergeant, Sgt Noakes. We spotted two Hun two-seaters and gave chase. I damaged one, but as I banked away the German gunner scored a lucky hit on my fuel line and I was forced to glide down and land in a field. At least the machine was intact.

I was back at Abeele by afternoon and aloft in a borrowed machine. For the very first time I got to lead a flight. I was ordered to take two sergeant-pilots, Sgt Thomas and Sgt Long, and shoot up a rail station behind the front. We were making a good job of it until two Fokkers dived on us. Thomas got one and I tangled with another. Although my Lewis rattled off a full drum, the Hun did not fall. We headed home to count the number of holes in our machines.
The next day began quietly with an early escort patrol. We nursed a Sopwith Strutter from No 5 (Naval) over to Houplin. The Huns were abed and chose not to disturb us and we returned for a second breakfast with nothing to report. This time I touched down flawlessly, rolled to the hangar, and proudly presented the ack emmas with a machine that required no major surgery. They clapped, though, which was a bit disconcerting.

But there was a second patrol that day. Another low job: same rail yard, same orders. Sgt Noakes led this time, which annoyed me. He was a pleasant fellow and a fine pilot, but I was the one with a pip on the sleeve of my second-hand tunic.

We were passing over LaGorgue at 5000 feet when I heard a sound from the Gnme Id never heard before like bits of tin being spun about inside a metal drum, which is likely a pretty accurate description of what was happening four or five feet behind my head. I quickly switched off and began spiralling down.

Now, the field at La Gorgue is surrounded by trees, so I planned to come in a little higher than normal. The problem is, you see, that as I made my final turn there was a strongish breeze that I had not fully accounted for. The DH2 wallowed a bit. I watched as the speed fell off and the trees passed underneath. All but one...

The left wings hit first and threw the machine around. Good, I thought, the engine wont kill me that way. Then the right wings hit another bit of woods. The longerons caught in some branches and for a moment everything came to a sudden halt forty feet above the ground. Then the longerons snapped, the tail assembly departed, and the wings crumpled backwards. I piloted my mount vertically to the ground. Somewhere on the trip the motor fell out, sideways, thank God. We hit with a violent crunch and I knew Id hurt my back once more. There was a terrible tangle of wood and wire and bits of canvas to crawl through. I staggered several feet out of the tree line and looked at the disassembled mass of the Royal Aircraft Factorys finest work. At least it didnt burn, I thought.

And then it went whoompf.

...

So back to the office. Major Dawes was standing behind his desk now and stabbing the bit of his pipe in the direction of my nose. You, Mr Keers, are an officer now. You need to set an example. You need to meet a standard. And you are failing, Mr Keers. Sort yourself out and start wrecking more Fokkers than DeHavillands. There, now be a good chap and bugger off smartly.

I saluted and left the office. I needed to get my back looked at.


"Now, the field at La Gorgue is surrounded by trees, so I planned to come in a little higher than normal."

#4292273 - 08/31/16 08:40 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Robert_Wiggins Offline
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Raine, it seems that "Splinters" could use a horse shoe nailed to his stick or a rabbit's foot or some other such artifice!


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#4292276 - 08/31/16 08:48 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Fullofit Offline
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Ajax, ON
Raine, I'm enjoying your stories immensely. Who the heck thought it would be a great idea to keep the trees on the approach path? Probably some German engineer.


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4292294 - 08/31/16 09:33 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Hasse Offline
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What a funny story! Let's hope Mr. Splinters is only experiencing some temporary difficulties, or he'll soon find himself in the trenches as an infantryman... biggrin


"Upon my word I've had as much excitement on a car as in the air, especially since the R.F.C. have had women drivers."

James McCudden, Five Years in the Royal Flying Corps
#4292296 - 08/31/16 09:36 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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MFair Offline
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Fine story Raine! Seems a few of us are having a little trouble setting these birds on the ground.


Never approach a bull from the front, a horse from the rear or a fool from either end.
BOC Member since....I can't remember!
#4292651 - 09/01/16 05:54 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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carrick58 Offline
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Clever Saville
Sgt, Rfc
24 Sqn.


September 1, 1916.

Nice to be flying again even if it was a boring Security Patrol.


#4292683 - 09/01/16 06:37 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Fullofit Offline
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Ajax, ON
April News of the World for Intrepid Fliers:

April 1
British forces on the River Tigris renewed their attempts to break Turkish lines and relieve the besieged garrison at Kut-al-Amara.
April 2
More than 100 men and boys were killed by an explosion at the Explosives Loading Company munitions factory at Faversham in Kent when a store of TNT and ammonium nitrate blew up.
April 3
The Greek Government refused to allow an overland route for Serbian troops from Corfu to Salonika.
April 4
Russian General Aleksei Brusilov replaced General Nikolay Iudovich Ivanov in command of the Southern Front.
April 5
In the final Allied attempt to relieve Kut, British forces attacked Falahiya. After an initial success, the Turks held the garrison.
German forces captured Haucourt at Verdun.
April 6
German troops pushed forward towards Bethincourt and Hill 265 at the Battle of Verdun.
April 7
Russian forces renewed their offensive at Lake Naroch, with limited success.
April 8
French forces evacuated Bethincourt at Verdun.
April 9
German forces launched a coordinated attack on both sides of the Meuse and captured part of Le Mort Homme, consisting of Hill 256 and Hill 295, northwest of Verdun.
April 10
In Paris, the International Olympic Committee confirmed that the Games would not be held until the War was over.
April 11
Portuguese troops occupied Kionga in German East Africa.
April 14
Aircraft of Royal Naval Air Service flew from Mudros and attacked Constantinople and Adrianople.
April 15
The Serbian Army landed at Salonika from Corfu.
April 16
German forces bombarded Hill 304 at the Battle of Verdun.
April 17
British forces in German East Africa launched an attack on Kondoa Irangi.
April 18
Russian forces captured Trebizond on the Black Sea from Turkey without opposition.
US President Wilson threatened to break off diplomatic relations with Germany if submarine attacks on passenger ships are not stopped.
April 19
British forces captured Kondoa Irangi in German East Africa.
Field Marshal von der Goltz was assassinated by an Albanian officer in Asia Minor.
April 20
Russian troops from the Far East arrived at Marseilles to fight in France.
April 21
Irish revolutionary Roger Casement landed at Tralee Bay in County Kerry in Ireland from a German submarine and was arrested by British authorities.
April 22
The final attack by British troops on Sanna-i-Yat was repulsed during the Siege of Kut.
April 24
The Easter Rising began when Irish Republicans staged an armed insurrection against British rule with the aim of establishing an independent Ireland.
The river steamer HMS Julnar was sunk during a final attempt to provide supplies to the besieged troops at Kut-al-Amara.
April 25
A German naval squadron bombarded Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth on the east coast of Britain.
April 26
An agreement was signed in Berlin for the repatriation of sick and wounded British and German POWs to Switzerland.
The British gunboat Helga bombarded the city of Dublin from the River Liffey and destroyed Liberty Hall.
April 27
Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland, Lord Wimborne proclaimed martial law in Ireland.
April 29
After nearly five months General Charles Townshend surrendered the garrison at Kut-al-Amara to the Turks.
April 30
The Lake Naroch Offensive ended with a German victory when the Russian attack petered out.

(From The Great War - Unseen Archives by Robert Hamilton)


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4292684 - 09/01/16 06:39 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Fullofit Offline
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Fullofit  Offline
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Ajax, ON
August News of the World for Warbirds Rising:

August 2
The Italian Dreadnought Leonardo da Vinci sank in Taranto harbour in Southern Italy after an internal explosion caused her to capsize.
August 3
The Irish Nationalist Roger Casement was hanged at Pentonville Prison for his involvement in the Easter Rising in Dublin earlier in the year.
The Battle of Romani began. The unsuccessful attempt by the German led Ottoman force to seize control of the Suez Canal was the last ground attack on the critical waterway during the war.
August 5
The advance of the main body of British forces began through the Nguru Hills during the East Africa Campaign.
August 6
The Sixth Battle of the Isonzo was launched against a combined German-Austro-Hungarian force. Also known as the Battle of Gorizia it was the most successful Italian offensive along the Isonzo River in North Eastern Italy during the war.
August 8
The Portuguese Government accepted the participation of Portugal in the war and extended military co-operation to the Europe.
August 9
Italian Chief-of-Staff Luigi Cadorna led his forces to take Gorizia and establish a bridgehead across the Isonzo River during the Sixth Battle of the Isonzo.
August 10
After its initial success the Brusilov Offensive came to an end with the loss of about 500,000 Russian and 375,000 Austrian lives.
August 11
The German colonial district of Mpwapwa in German East Africa was occupied by British forces.
August 12
Italian troops landed at Salonika in Greece to join Allied forces.
August 15
A British air attack and naval bombardment was launched on Bagamoyo on the German East African coast. The Germans were overrun and the German garrison taken.
During the Caucasus Campaign the Armenian towns of Mush and Bitlis were re-occupied by Turkish forces.
August 17
Luigi Cadorna had succeeded in moving forward 5km along a 20km-front and ended the offensive in the Sixth Battle of the Isonzo.
The Treaty of Bucharest of 1916 was signed between Romania and the Entente Powers. The treaty stipulated the conditions under which Romania agreed to join the war on the side of the Entente.
August 18
A combined British-French offensive was launched on the German held village of Guillemont with three British corps attacking the village while the French attacked the nearby village of Maurepas.
August 19
Two town-class light cruisers, HMS Falmouth and HMS Nottingham were sunk by U-boats.
August 22
The Morogoro Region of Kilosa in Tanganyika (now Tanzania) was captured by British forces.
August 23
The German blockade-breaking cargo submarine Deutschland returned to Bremerhaven in Germany.
August 24
In another engagement between the Russian Caucasus army and their Ottoman counterparts, Mush and Bitlis were again taken by Russian forces.
August 25
Russian forces cross the Danube into the Dobrudja to assist Romanian forces.
August 26
Under General Smuts, the city of Morogoro in Tanganyika was taken by British forces.
August 27
Following the Treaty of Bucharest, the Romanian Government ordered mobilisation of their armies and crossed the border of the Austro-Hungarian Empire into the much-contested province of Transylvania.
August 28
Germany declared war on Romania and Italy declared war on Germany.
August 29
Brasov in Transylvania was occupied by Romanian forces.
Field-Marshal von Hindenburg succeeded General von Falkenhayn as Chief of the General Staff of the German Field Armies with General von Ludendorff as Chief Quartermaster-General.
August 30
The National Schism, caused by the disagreement on foreign policy between King Constantine I of Greece and revolutionary Eleftherios Venizelos, led to the Venizelist revolt in Salonika.

(From The Great War - Unseen Archives by Robert Hamilton)


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4292785 - 09/01/16 10:00 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 2,593
MFair Offline
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MFair  Offline
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Posts: 2,593
Thank you for the news Fullofit. Always very informative! Good to see you back Carrick. Bolitho is back and flew his first mission today. All went well and he was very careful on landing.


Never approach a bull from the front, a horse from the rear or a fool from either end.
BOC Member since....I can't remember!
#4292859 - 09/02/16 02:30 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
Joined: Jun 2014
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Banjoman Offline
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Posts: 2,420
Antigua, Guatemala
Guys, I will have our status report on Sunday. I'm still messing with computer issues down here in sunny Guatemala so I haven't really had a chance to fly any.


Member and provider of banjo music for the Illustrious BOC
#4293012 - 09/02/16 04:03 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 5,086
carrick58 Offline
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Clever Saville
Sgt, Rfc
24 Sqn.


2 Sep 1916.


Line Patrol: Arras-St Vaast.
Almost a soild wall of clouds at 2000 meters. Our flight was at 2300 meters and you wouldnt have seen and entire Jasta.
No contact.

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