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#4283159 - 07/30/16 01:25 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Banjoman Offline
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I figured you didn't have A/C, just a poor attempt at humor. I also agree with your comment about the Pups. Does it cool down much at night?


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#4283161 - 07/30/16 01:37 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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It's getting cooler already. But it always takes a few days for all the stored heat to dissipate. Up here in the far north, the sun doesn't set at all for most of the summer. This period of late July is actually the first time in several weeks when it goes below the horizon!


"Upon my word I've had as much excitement on a car as in the air, especially since the R.F.C. have had women drivers."

James McCudden, Five Years in the Royal Flying Corps
#4283176 - 07/30/16 02:46 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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That would be kind of cool, but it would take some getting used to constant daylight.


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#4283196 - 07/30/16 04:12 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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I can feel Hasse's Pain. I used to live up in Alaska for 3 years. During the summer Jun and July) it ws 90-98 degrees Dry and dusty with No air conditioning. Fall came ( Temps falling down to 30-20 above Zero), the month of August. then Winter, Sept-May, had temps down to 30 below. The worst part was one year at 30 below their was a wind that dropped the temp to 60 below. Luckily , It was only for a day or so then the wind backed off.

#4283221 - 07/30/16 05:29 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: Banjoman]  
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Originally Posted By: Banjoman
That would be kind of cool, but it would take some getting used to constant daylight.


Winter balances it out - then the sun won't rise at all. biggrin


"Upon my word I've had as much excitement on a car as in the air, especially since the R.F.C. have had women drivers."

James McCudden, Five Years in the Royal Flying Corps
#4283527 - 07/31/16 07:50 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Here is the latest status report. Deacon211, I'm still confused. You have Ingvar in an Army unit with a Naval rank. I've left him the naval unit that he started in. Please let me know how I should be posting him.



Last edited by Banjoman; 07/31/16 07:51 PM.

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#4283808 - 08/01/16 04:08 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Sgt Brummel
32 Sgn
Vert Galand, France.


1 August 1918.

Hq want a Show the Flag over Hun land so tagged along as Tail end Charlie. No Joy.


#4283810 - 08/01/16 04:23 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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March news of the World for Intrepid Fliers:

March 1
Germany began an extended submarine campaign using a strategy of trying to lure the British Royal Navy's Grand Fleet into U-boat traps.
March 2
Russian forces captured Bitlis from the Turks in Armenia.
March 4
The German raider SMS Moewe returned to a heroes welcome in Bremen, Germany following a series of successful attacks on British ships in the Atlantic.
March 5
A combined British-South African Colonial force began an offensive towards Mount Kilimanjaro in East Africa.
March 7
Newton Diehl Baker was appointed US Secretary of State.
March 8
Another British attempt to relieve the besieged force at Kut-al-Amara was defeated on the Dujaila Redoubt.
March 9
The Fifth Battle of the Isonzo began when the Italians launched another offensive on the Isonzo River.
The German Government declared war on Portugal over the seizure of German ships in Lisbon.
March 10
British forces captured Taveta in East Africa.
March 11
The Battle for Latema Nek began in the Latema-Reata between Germany and British-South African forces in British East Africa.
March 12
The action at Latema Nek ended with an Allied victory.
An Allied conference at Chantilly discussed the forthcoming summer offensive on the Somme.
March 13
New Moshi in East Africa was occupied by British forces.
March 14
British forces reoccupied Sollum on the Egyptian coast.
March 15
Austria-Hungary followed Germany and declared war on Portugal.
March 16
General Pierre Auguste Roques succeeded Joseph Gallieni as French Minister of War.
At the Battle of Verdun the Germans successive attacks on Vaux were repulsed.
March 18
The Lake Naroch Offensive began when Russian forces attacked the Germans at Lake Naroch on the Eastern Front.
March 20 French politician Baron Denys Cochin was appointed Under-Secretary of State for foreign policy matters responsible for dealing with the blockade of Germany.
March 21
German forces retreated from the Kilimanjaro area after they were defeated at Nahe.
March 22
Yuan Shikal formally abandoned monarchism and relinquished the throne of China.
March 24
The passenger ship SS Sussex was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the English Channel.
March 26
Russian forces continued the attack at Lake Naroch without success.
March 27
Russian commanders suspended their offensive at Lake Naroch.
March 28
An Inter-Allied conference in Paris resulted in a declaration of unity on military, economic and diplomatic affairs between Belgium, France, Great Britain, Italy, Japan, Portugal, Russia and Serbia .
March 29
General Alexei Andreyevich Polivanov resigned as Russian War Minister and was succeeded by General Dmitry Savelich Shuvaev.
March 30
The Russian hospital ship Portugal was sunk by a torpedo from the German submarine U-33 in the Black Sea.
March 31
A German airship raid targeted the East coast of England; the Zeppelin was subsequently shot down by gunfire in the Thames Estuary.

(From The Great War - Unseen Archives by Robert Hamilton)


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4283811 - 08/01/16 04:27 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Ajax, ON
Warbirds Rising news of the World for the month of July:

July 1
The Battle of the Somme began on the Western Front. The opening day of the battle was the worst single day's fighting in British military history with casualties of nearly 60,000 British troops.
July 2
The Battle of Erzincan began between Russian and Turkish troops.
July 3
The Russian and Japanese Governments concluded a treaty regarding future policy in the Far East.
July 4
Heavy thunderstorms impeded progress at the Somme as British troops continued their advance in La Boiselle.
July 5
British and Indian troops entered Tanga on the Indian Ocean in German East Africa.
July 7
David Lloyd George succeeded the late Lord Kitchener as British Secretary of State for War.
July 9
The British liberal politician Edwin Samuel Montagu was appointed Minister of Munitions in Great Britain.
July 10
The Italian destroyer Impetuoso was torpedoed and sunk by a German U-boat in the Adriatic Sea.
July 11
A German submarine shelled Seaham harbor in County Durham.
July 12
British forces succeeded in clearing Mametz Wood, four and a half kilometers past the German lines on the Somme.
July 13
British troops temporarily pierced the German line at Bezantin Ridge on the Somme.
July 14
The Battle of Bazentin Ridge began, launching the second phase of the Somme Offensive.
British troops occupied the German port of Mwanza in German East Africa.
July 15
A subsidiary attack of the Somme Offensive, the Battle of Delville Wood began when South African troops attempted to clear the woods of German forces.
July 17
The Battle of Bazentin Ridge ended in a tactical British victory.
July 18
The British Government ratified a treaty with Ibn Saud, the Emir of Nejd.
July 19
The Battle of Fromelles was a combined operation by British and Australian troops to divert attention from the Battle of the Somme.
July 20
The Battle of Fromelles ended with a decisive German victory.
July 22
Sergei Sazonov resigned as Russian Foreign Minister and was succeeded by Boris Sturmer.
July 23
The two week struggle for the French village of Pozieres and the surrounding ridge, the Battle of Pozieres Ridge
began.
July 25
Russian forces captured Erzingian in Armenia which was then evacuated without further fighting.
July 27
British naval Captain Charles Fryatt was executed by the Germans after he was court-martialed following his
unsuccessful attempt to ram and sink a German U-Boat.
July 28
British troops captured Delville Wood and Longueval village and progressed towards Pozieres.
July 29
The German Government rejected Britain's offer to permit sea passage of humanitarian foodstuffs going to Poland from the United States.
July 30
The first combined Franco-British aerial operations took place on the Western Front.
The Black Tom Island munitions plant in New Jersey was destroyed by an explosion. It was suspected to be the work
of German saboteurs.
July 31
The British Prime Minister denounced the execution of Captain Fryatt in the House of Commons.

(From The Great War - Unseen Archives by Robert Hamilton)


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4284033 - 08/02/16 01:52 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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ug 1916.

Another Bump in the program, all a/c crashed after appearing 40 ft off the ground in the Air. Down for another 14 days Wounded ? Gotta install and learn to use the retro start program. darkcloud

#4284037 - 08/02/16 02:23 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Banjoman Offline
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You should post this on the Technical section. They really need to fix this problem.


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#4284126 - 08/02/16 08:50 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: Banjoman]  
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Originally Posted By: Banjoman
You should post this on the Technical section. They really need to fix this problem.


I'm wondering if it's not system related. I've been flying for a "while" now without ever encountering this bug, meanwhile Carrick had two of them already in a relatively short span. I could just be lucky and having said that it'll probably happen the next time I'm on the airfield. explode


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4284188 - 08/03/16 12:31 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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It has happened to me a couple of times, but nothing like the frequency that Carrick is experiencing.


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#4284350 - 08/03/16 04:13 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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It may be just 32 Sqn program track in 1916, so Killed off the pilot. ( Pushed him into the Virtual Spinning Prop ) I will be starting a new one in a different Sqn and see what happens.

Last edited by carrick58; 08/03/16 04:45 PM.
#4284353 - 08/03/16 04:17 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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#4284364 - 08/03/16 04:42 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Sgt, Saville
24 sqn
Flanders, France.

3 Aug 1916.


I went up on a Patrol along with 8 others split into 2 flights. No e/a spotted

#4284484 - 08/03/16 09:45 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Carrick, your new pilot better behave this time. He knows how ruthless you are and what you did to your last one. It may be a tall order in the spinning incinerator.


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4284555 - 08/04/16 02:49 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Raine Online content
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Sgt Alfred Keers is learning to love the Fee!

Mr Whieldon (his Christian name is Jamie, but I cant get comfortable using a given name with an officer, even in private) was becoming a great chum. We would disappear for walks and talk about home and dreams for the future. His home is in the Hebrides, the island of Jura, where his father is a minister. He helped maintain automobiles for a distillery owner there until he headed for England to join up. He was briefly an artillery officer before getting lucky enough to be transferred to the RFC in early 1915 and attached to 7 Squadron at Chemsford for training of sorts, as he put it. He told me that Mr Alice, the fellow I flew over from England and looped the Fee with, is still put out that we have a couple of Huns to our credit while he has none.

The news from home is a bit upsetting. People have not yet realized there is a war on, what with strikes and various disruptions. I try to write to the parents every other day, and to Rosetta and Eliza a letter each week. We are going up only once a day at present, but I am told that we can expect to be up two or even three times a day as the weather improves and action at the front intensifies.

On 31 March we were sent on a reconnaissance patrol to the front near Armentieres and were engaged by Fokkers. A thrilling time. We force one to land and destroyed another, but the formation was split up and we had no confirmation. Major Wilson is very reluctant to submit an unwitnessed claim to headquarters, and ours was rejected.
The next day, 1 April, saw us patrolling down to the Somme River in a cold rain. Again we were engaged by Fokkers and again Mr Whieldon drove one down out of control. And again our claim was denied.

Mr Alice was heard to cast doubts on our claims, I am told. I would like to get commissioned so I might cuff him with impugnity.

On 2 April we went south again, this time to Arras, but saw nothing.

Then our luck turned. On 3 April we were sent well over the lines to an area south of Lille. We patrolled for nearly two hours without seeing a thing, but on our return I noticed friendly Archie off to the northwest of us towards Abeele. I turned to investigate. Captain Paget-Graves did not join us, nor did Mr McNaughtons aircraft. After a few minutes, we saw two Aviatiks, a Hun two-seater type, circling the area. I made for one of them and Mr Whieldon prepared his Lewis gun. To our surprise a third Aviatik fired at us from behind!

It wasnt hard to evade the Hun and we were soon under its tail. Mr Whieldon fired only about 20 or 30 rounds and it burst into flame and shed its wings, falling in a field near Poperinghe. It was our third official kill, and I rode in the Crossley with Mr Whieldon to inspect it that afternoon. By the time we found the wreck it had been picked over by souvenir hunters, but Mr Whieldon got a bit of fabric with the serial number and I prised out the altitude indicator, a lovely piece of German craftsmanship.

On the following day, 4 April, we did a reconnaissance flight over the German lines southeast of Arras. Captain Paget-Graves dropped out with engine trouble before we crossed over, and Mr McNaughton took the lead. As we were about to turn back, I noticed three monoplanes emerge from a bank of clouds about a mile off and turn towards us. I signalled to Mr McNaughton but he simply pointed west and we dashed for safety. But the Fokkers had the height advantage and gained on us. I saw one getting close to Lieut McNaughtons machine and turned to engage it. As I did so I saw a second Hun under our tail. We shook him off and chased the Hun on Mr McNaughtons tail, but the same green-painted Fokker that had eluded us a few days before engaged us. We turned and twisted at low level over the ruins of Monchy. The Hun was a star turn. Finally Mr Whieldon put a few rounds into the Hun and chased him off. We thought we were clear, but another Fokker made a pass at us. He was fairly dud, though, and we got behind him and finished him off. The machine fell into a tree line behind the enemy trench lines. We circled for height and dashed home to find that Mr McNaughtons machine had collided with the third Fokker and crashed. He walked away nearly unharmed but his observer, Lieut Stapleton, was killed.

The RO called the headquarters nearest the scene of the engagement and we were delighted to learn that the 55th Divisions artillery observers confirmed a Fokker and a pusher type duelling on their front at the right time of day, with the German aircraft crashing. We now had our fourth official victory!


"Mr Whieldon fired only about 20 or 30 rounds and it burst into flame and shed its wings..."


"We turned and twisted at low level over the ruins of Monchy."

#4284691 - 08/04/16 02:51 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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yep

Ah Yes Fullofit. Next time its Head 1st into the Prop for the unfit pilot.

#4284767 - 08/04/16 05:47 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Fantastic reports and pics, gentlemen! The Fee seems to be a real killing machine when flown by Raine. I must confess it's one of the crates that I've never liked to fly myself, but it's great to see somebody making so good use of it. smile

August Ege is back in action...

***

The Diary of August Ege.

FFA 71. Frescaty-Metz.

Montag, 3.IV.16, 9.00 Uhr nachmittags.


This day didnt turn out to be quite as ordinary as it first seemed!

At 9 oclock this morning, I was flying a regular artillery co-operation mission for the heavy batteries of XV. Armeekorps in the Fleury-Vaux sector northeast of Verdun with Oberleutnant Balthazar as my observer. Everything was going as planned, though the rainy and cloudy weather had again forced us to stay lower than usual and the terrible mud on the ground seemed to be sucking in the shells of our guns, making it something of a challenge for Balthazar to accurately register their hits.

We were making another pass over the target area from west to east when I spotted a machine approaching us directly from the south. It was heading straight towards us and I became suspicious of its behaviour, knowing how the French have been increasing their aerial presence in the sector in the past few weeks. The Aviatik is a gentle beast, so I could easily let go of the controls and watch the approaching machine through my binoculars. My suspicions were correct - it was a French Nieuport single-seater, armed with a gun over the top plane!

I instantly shouted to Balthazar and motioned at him to stop working his wireless apparatus, pointing towards the approaching Frenchman. Balthazar quickly understood what was happening and grabbed hold of one of our Parabellums, cocking the gun and turning it towards our enemy.

What happened next is even now something of a blur in my mind. I can see the Frenchman approaching and myself turning our Aviatik towards him so that Balthazar can get a good shot at his machine. Then I see the bolt of Balthazars gun moving back and forth and bright sparks coming from the ejection port - and above everything else, even over the loud roar of the engine, I hear sharp cracks which I realize are coming from the gun firing so close to my ears.

I dont remember looking at our attacker - I so was fully concentrated in flying our machine and trying to keep a good field of fire for Balthazar. Then, quite suddenly, he ceased firing and let the gun lower itself to its rest position, shouting at me and gesturing wildly to the right and rear of my cockpit. I turned my head to look and saw a bright ball of fire - our opponent had burst into flames! Black smoke and flying debris surrounded the burning enemy machine, which lingered in the air for a second before plummeting down towards the earth like a comet from the heavens above. We could see the remains of the Nieuport scatter down on the trenches near Vaux.

After continuing on our course for a while we both seemed to realize that even after our sudden victory in the air, there was still a war going on all around us, and that we had to get back to our normal business. Our machine seemed to be working well, so I was confident that the enemy plane hadnt managed to hit us. I brought us back to our target area and Balthazar resumed his work with the wireless. Everything had happened so quickly that the artillery detachment probably hadnt even realized Balthazar was no longer sending them his corrections!

The rest of the mission was uneventful, as was our return flight to Frescaty. After we had landed, we informed our mechanics and then Hauptmann Stelzer of what had happened. Everybody was greatly excited by our news, and Stelzer immediately contacted AOK 5 to see if the ground troops could confirm our victory. It took a few hours - we were all waiting in the mess as the weather had turned too bad to keep flying - but finally the phone rang and Stelzer received word from the Stabsoffizier der Flieger: the infantry division in the Vaux sector had seen our air battle and the destruction of the enemy machine! Apparently its remains had rained down on our own positions, so there was no lack of evidence to support our case.

Afterwards, there was so much shouting and cheering and laughing that my ears are still ringing from it - or maybe it was the fire from Balthazars Parabellum? Our Abteilung has scored its first kill, and I get to share the glory with my observer!

It is a peculiar feeling. On one hand, Im happy about what happened. But on the other, the image of the Frenchman going down in flames somehow troubles me. Were at war, and hundreds - maybe thousands - of people are dying every day all over the world. It wasnt even me who pulled the trigger, but Balthazar.

And yet - it is a peculiar feeling, to see somebody die like that.

Perhaps Ill get used to it.



View from the office.


"Upon my word I've had as much excitement on a car as in the air, especially since the R.F.C. have had women drivers."

James McCudden, Five Years in the Royal Flying Corps
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