Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Rate This Thread
Hop To
Page 1 of 2 1 2
#3436574 - 11/18/11 11:07 AM Navigation tips.  
Joined: May 2011
Posts: 588
Bokononist Offline
Currently using: Occams Electric Shaver
Bokononist  Offline
Currently using: Occams Electric Shaver
Member

Joined: May 2011
Posts: 588
Liverpool, UK (Cornish exile)
A lot of people seem to be baffled by the compass and where they are going. Here's a try at showing how to.set the darn thing.
Mind you, I'm no expert, I made it work like this for me and that's it. I just hope it helps anyone interested.......

First of all, we see the compass like this on start up:




Now move the course setter in such a way that the train tracks (the yellow lines) line up with the white needle with the crossbar (the north side of the train track should point to the crossbarred white line). In this case I needed to decrease the course setter.




On the screen somewhere in the info window you will see the degrees counting up or down. Read the last line of degrees (in this example its 252) and set that in the Directional gyro.
Again you will have to up or down the degrees until it reaches the just found setting. In this case 252





You are ready now. Fly on the Directional Gyro, but be aware the DG is quickly off. So repeat this procedure once every 10-15 minutes or after violent moves. Make sure the compass (the magnetic one) is steady before doing this, so trim your aircraft.

I hope this helps people.




Originally posted by a kind chap called Bando and resurected from the archives, haven't seen him around for a while though.

Anyway, while this gives me a better idea of how to use the compass, I'm still not sure how much this helps me, unless I am given a heading by someone either over the radio or in my breifing.
Can any of you more experienced pilots share your navigation tips, I know you blue guys have a homing pidgeons instinct that helps you find Hawkinge(!) pilot but for instance (as was mentioned in another thread) what would you do in bad weather to find your way back to base or to your target etc.......? ahoy

Last edited by Bokononist; 11/18/11 11:09 AM.

"Tiger got to hunt, bird got to fly; Man got to sit and wonder, 'Why, why, why?' Tiger got to sleep, bird got to land; Man got to tell himself he understand." - A calypso.

i5 2500K@4.5Ghz | MSI P67A-GD53 | 8G DDR3 Corsair@1600 | Gainward GLH 460x2 SLI oc | Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD | Antec Truepower New 750W PSU | Win 7 64bit | Black Widow HOTAS | Freetrack 2.2/PS3 eyetoy

Inline advert (2nd and 3rd post)

#3436593 - 11/18/11 12:56 PM Re: Navigation tips. [Re: Bokononist]  
Joined: Jun 2005
Posts: 7,132
Trooper117 Offline
Hotshot
Trooper117  Offline
Hotshot

Joined: Jun 2005
Posts: 7,132
UK
For me, there is no substitute for spending time flying around your area of operations, and making note of any geographical features that stand out, shapes of lakes and rivers, prominent and obvious land marks, man made structures of note, like radar sites etc, and then make notes on where your airfield is from those points, noting headings etc.
Once they are in your head, most of the time I just fly in the general direction, pick up a landmark or object and orientate myself from there.

#3436616 - 11/18/11 02:10 PM Re: Navigation tips. [Re: Trooper117]  
Joined: May 2011
Posts: 588
Bokononist Offline
Currently using: Occams Electric Shaver
Bokononist  Offline
Currently using: Occams Electric Shaver
Member

Joined: May 2011
Posts: 588
Liverpool, UK (Cornish exile)
Thanks Trooper, that's more or less what I do at the moment, but what happens when visibility is low, cloud cover etc(fingers crossed.)


"Tiger got to hunt, bird got to fly; Man got to sit and wonder, 'Why, why, why?' Tiger got to sleep, bird got to land; Man got to tell himself he understand." - A calypso.

i5 2500K@4.5Ghz | MSI P67A-GD53 | 8G DDR3 Corsair@1600 | Gainward GLH 460x2 SLI oc | Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD | Antec Truepower New 750W PSU | Win 7 64bit | Black Widow HOTAS | Freetrack 2.2/PS3 eyetoy

#3436749 - 11/18/11 06:11 PM Re: Navigation tips. [Re: Bokononist]  
Joined: Jun 2005
Posts: 7,132
Trooper117 Offline
Hotshot
Trooper117  Offline
Hotshot

Joined: Jun 2005
Posts: 7,132
UK
Well, you have to do what we always do.. rely on the compass, and that means all RAF flyers getting their heads around compass setting, time speed and distance etc..
What we don't have at the moment of course is the ability to ask ground control for directions etc, as the whole radio and comms system is pretty much u.s.
That for me is far more important to fix than introducing a modern flippin stunt plane to muck around with.

#3436811 - 11/18/11 07:39 PM Re: Navigation tips. [Re: Bokononist]  
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 94
JG13_Doggles Offline
Junior Member
JG13_Doggles  Offline
Junior Member

Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 94
Learning to navigate is one of those things you can't rush. It just comes with experience. However, I fancy myself a pretty good navigator and can offer some advice.

If you get lost:

  • Don't panic!
  • The first thing you should do is get a general idea of where you are. Are you over the Channel, France or England? This should be easy since you know where you took off from. If you took off from Calais, crossed the Channel to England and got lost, you must therefore be somewhere over England.
  • Check your 6, then pick a heading and stay on it. I recommend heading directly for the nearest coastline. If no coast line is in sight, head in the general direction of home. I.e. if you're over France and you took off from Hawkinge, it's time to head in a Northerly direction.
  • While maintaining the same general heading and checking your 6 occasionally, have a look out the window for conspicuous terrain features. Good examples are lakes/rivers/forests with interesting shapes, or larger cities with good landmarks like the circular island in Calais, or the different but uniquely-shaped harbors at Dover and Hawkinge. Coastlines are usually the best navigational aids.
  • Once you spot a landmark that you think is good, try to find it on the map. It's very important that you know your heading, or at least know the true orientation of the landmark. That arrow-shaped forest pointing to the right? If you're heading South it'll actually be pointing to the East (left) on your map.
  • Can't find any good landmarks? Find a coastline and follow it. Eventually you will come across something that's unmistakeable, like the weird little appendage of land at Manston, Dungerness point, the Cotentin Peninsula, or the Isle of Wight. Once you find these you now have a pretty good idea where you are.
  • Set a course, or follow the coastline back to familiar areas!


Don't sweat it if you get lost a lot. The map is enormous and if you aren't familiar with it, navigating can seem quite daunting. Rest assured that it DOES get easier with time. There will be a moment where things seem to just "click" for you, and you'll find that in familiar areas of the map you won't even have to think about it. You'll look out the window now and then, see Wissant, and know exactly where you are. The whole thing will take two seconds.

Unfortunately there's really no substitute for practice. The good news is that you don't have to memorize the whole map. Once you become proficient at navigating, getting lost becomes a non-issue, and you'll be able to venture out into unfamiliar areas of the map without worry. In fact, on one of the 5./JG27 missions my squad was assigned to escort some Stukas that were attacking some British ships out over the widest part of the Channel between Normandy and the Portsmouth area. We took off from Le Havre, and I'd never flown over this particular part of the map before, ever. But because we kept a good sense of heading and coordinated that sense with landmarks that we expected to see, when my wingman was low on fuel we were able to make it to Querqueville, France and land safely. Had we tried to get back to Le Havre he would surely have run out and had to ditch.

A few more miscellaneous tips/advice:

  • Understand the lingo. If someone says "Engaged defensive with two Spitfires at 4k in Foxtrot 13 by 2" you should know that this means he's in a bad position against two spits at 4000 metres in the bottom-middle (South-middle) portion of grid F-13 on your map.
  • It's extremely difficult to keep track of your position in the heat of combat. Don't feel bad if you shoot the guy down and have to take a few minutes to figure out where you ended up.
  • It's also quite difficult to get an accurate position when you're out over water. This is natural, and this is why the fancy navigational aids used by the US Navy in the Pacific Theatre were developed.
  • Get in the habit of thinking of things in terms of cardinal directions (N, S, E, W) rather than relative directions (left, right, ahead, behind)


Hope this helps!

Last edited by JG13_Doggles; 11/18/11 08:24 PM.
#3436826 - 11/18/11 07:54 PM Re: Navigation tips. [Re: JG13_Doggles]  
Joined: Feb 2011
Posts: 605
cheesehawk Offline
Member
cheesehawk  Offline
Member

Joined: Feb 2011
Posts: 605
CA, USA
Excellent post Doggles! Now if I could just find England wink

#3437012 - 11/18/11 11:40 PM Re: Navigation tips. [Re: Bokononist]  
Joined: Feb 2001
Posts: 1,601
ATAG_Snapper Offline
Member
ATAG_Snapper  Offline
Member

Joined: Feb 2001
Posts: 1,601
Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
Excellent thread, Bokononist, and excellent responses!

Since we currently fly under ever-sunny skies at the moment, I always (try) to make note of where the sun is located relative to where I'm going. If I'm heading east at sunrise on a patrol or escort duty towards the Occupied French coast, I make a note that homeward bound I should have the sun at my back. I've found this so handy when all hello breaks loose and I'm diving madly for home and hedge hopping (or wave hopping?) on the deck with three 109's in hot pursuit. Keeping it simple while massaging throttle, prop pitch, radiator setting, temps, etc while weaving madly through hillsides/wavetops.....remembering to keep the sun at my back can be a lifesaver!


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
My system: i7 4770K @ 3.5 MHZ, Win 10 64-bit, 24 Gig DDR3, Gigabyte GTX 970 4 Gig, Thrustmaster Warthog HOTAS, CH Quadrant, Saitek Combat Pedals, Track IR 5, LG 55” 4K LED TV
#3437060 - 11/19/11 01:07 AM Re: Navigation tips. [Re: Bokononist]  
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 82
bradleydog62 Offline
Junior Member
bradleydog62  Offline
Junior Member

Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 82
Allen,TX
Could someone also explain German AC: Course Autopilot Deviation, Directional Gyro, Course Autopilot Preset, Repeater Compass Course Setter, Course Autopilot Adjust Course R&L. I have read the manual and asked online for directions for using these gauges/ instruments without response. The explanation for the British compass is a big help and, although I am not yet at the "Don't Buy Green Bananas" age, I can see it from here. In other words, plesae shorten my learning curve. Many thanks, John

#3437167 - 11/19/11 07:41 AM Re: Navigation tips. [Re: bradleydog62]  
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 94
JG13_Doggles Offline
Junior Member
JG13_Doggles  Offline
Junior Member

Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 94
Originally Posted By: zahnarzt62
Could someone also explain German AC: Course Autopilot Deviation, Directional Gyro, Course Autopilot Preset, Repeater Compass Course Setter, Course Autopilot Adjust Course R&L. I have read the manual and asked online for directions for using these gauges/ instruments without response. The explanation for the British compass is a big help and, although I am not yet at the "Don't Buy Green Bananas" age, I can see it from here. In other words, plesae shorten my learning curve. Many thanks, John


Sorry. I have no clue what most of those do. In fact I'm not even sure the 109 has most of those functions. The person to ask is a guy who flies under the handle ATAG_MajorBorris. He flies the Ju-88 almost exclusively and knows it pretty well.

Hop onto the ATAG teamspeak server sometime.

#3437744 - 11/20/11 11:03 AM Re: Navigation tips. [Re: JG13_Doggles]  
Joined: May 2011
Posts: 588
Bokononist Offline
Currently using: Occams Electric Shaver
Bokononist  Offline
Currently using: Occams Electric Shaver
Member

Joined: May 2011
Posts: 588
Liverpool, UK (Cornish exile)
Thanks for all the great responses guys, there is a mine of great advice there cheers . One of the things that gets on my nerves is when I'm trying to give my position to other pilots when trying to rendevouz, or giving the position of enemy planes, one look at my instruments or out of the side of my cockpit is all it takes to lose my target sometimes!
Zahnarzt62, I don't know much about the blue planes, I'm waiting until I consider myself a decent pilot in the Spits and Hurricanes before I try to learn those craft properly (This maybe some time! I can't imagine having to cope with the learning curve with the amount of training given to some of our BoB pilots, especially against the far more experienced Luftwaffwe pilots). If I do come across any info regarding the 'blue' instrumentation I'll be back here and post it.


"Tiger got to hunt, bird got to fly; Man got to sit and wonder, 'Why, why, why?' Tiger got to sleep, bird got to land; Man got to tell himself he understand." - A calypso.

i5 2500K@4.5Ghz | MSI P67A-GD53 | 8G DDR3 Corsair@1600 | Gainward GLH 460x2 SLI oc | Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD | Antec Truepower New 750W PSU | Win 7 64bit | Black Widow HOTAS | Freetrack 2.2/PS3 eyetoy

#3467102 - 12/03/11 11:02 AM Re: Navigation tips. [Re: Trooper117]  
Joined: May 2011
Posts: 588
Bokononist Offline
Currently using: Occams Electric Shaver
Bokononist  Offline
Currently using: Occams Electric Shaver
Member

Joined: May 2011
Posts: 588
Liverpool, UK (Cornish exile)
Heres an excellent RAF film about low level navigation http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=4fa_1321810275. It was posted by ATAG_Septic a couple of weeks ago over at the ATAG forum.
Apperently navigation has a lot to do with planning! It usually takes all of my planning skills to find an couple of hours to fly at all Smile2

Last edited by Bokononist; 12/03/11 11:03 AM.

"Tiger got to hunt, bird got to fly; Man got to sit and wonder, 'Why, why, why?' Tiger got to sleep, bird got to land; Man got to tell himself he understand." - A calypso.

i5 2500K@4.5Ghz | MSI P67A-GD53 | 8G DDR3 Corsair@1600 | Gainward GLH 460x2 SLI oc | Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD | Antec Truepower New 750W PSU | Win 7 64bit | Black Widow HOTAS | Freetrack 2.2/PS3 eyetoy

#3467354 - 12/03/11 09:49 PM Re: Navigation tips. [Re: Bokononist]  
Joined: Mar 2011
Posts: 82
jimbop Offline
Junior Member
jimbop  Offline
Junior Member

Joined: Mar 2011
Posts: 82
Australia
Nice video, thanks. I've got the hang of setting the compass/course plotter and directional gyro as well as reading the map with protractor to determine correct gyro heading (draw intended course first then a vertical line to get bearing). Am now trying to come to terms with distance at altitude...


Custom magnetic stick, control box and pedals | EVGA GTX480 superclock | i7 2600k @ 4.5 | GA-P67A-UD4-B3 | 8GB DDR3 1666 Corsair Vengeance | Antec 1200W TruePower | Windows 7 64-bit | FT clip + modded Logitech Fusion
#3467621 - 12/04/11 01:24 PM Re: Navigation tips. [Re: Bokononist]  
Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 3,768
KRT_Bong Offline
It's KRT not Kurt
KRT_Bong  Offline
It's KRT not Kurt
Senior Member

Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 3,768
Gulf Coast of Florida
I can't use the compass at all, cant see it through the stick to even read a heading even if I could make out the numbers or figure what needle points where. We need the compass heading on the screen like in IL-2, might not be realistic but it's needed nonetheless. Crappiest excuse for a navigation tool ever invented, needlessly complicated.


Windows 7 64 SP1
Gigabyte 970A DS3P FX
AMD FX6300 Vishera 3.5 Ghz
GeForce 650 Ti 2Gb
8Gb Kingston 1600Mhz
Logitech G930

#3467822 - 12/04/11 08:29 PM Re: Navigation tips. [Re: Bokononist]  
Joined: Mar 2011
Posts: 82
jimbop Offline
Junior Member
jimbop  Offline
Junior Member

Joined: Mar 2011
Posts: 82
Australia
I think we need a 'glance at compass command' similar to the 'glance at dash' command.


Custom magnetic stick, control box and pedals | EVGA GTX480 superclock | i7 2600k @ 4.5 | GA-P67A-UD4-B3 | 8GB DDR3 1666 Corsair Vengeance | Antec 1200W TruePower | Windows 7 64-bit | FT clip + modded Logitech Fusion
#3481790 - 12/27/11 03:48 AM Re: Navigation tips. [Re: bradleydog62]  
Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 681
Blackdog_kt Offline
Member
Blackdog_kt  Offline
Member

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 681
Originally Posted By: jimbop
I think we need a 'glance at compass command' similar to the 'glance at dash' command.


+1, would solve everything.

I've been away for months (too much RL happening so i didn't have time to even lurk), and my secondary hard disk gave up the ghost (which is where i keep all my games installed) so i can't even play, but i thought i'd start popping in to the simming forums and see how things are going. So, here goes...


Originally Posted By: zahnarzt62
Could someone also explain German AC: Course Autopilot Deviation, Directional Gyro, Course Autopilot Preset, Repeater Compass Course Setter, Course Autopilot Adjust Course R&L. I have read the manual and asked online for directions for using these gauges/ instruments without response. The explanation for the British compass is a big help and, although I am not yet at the "Don't Buy Green Bananas" age, I can see it from here. In other words, plesae shorten my learning curve. Many thanks, John


I don't remember the exact naming convention used in the sim and due to lack of hard disk space i don't have it currently installed to check, so i will describe the instruments and what they do. From that point on, you can map controls to them and use them (or just click on the instruments) to see which is which.

Generally speaking and if my memory serves me right, the biggest amount of instruments you'll have in a German bird is:
magnetic compass ("whiskey" compass or round compass with course setting marker)
repeater compass with course setting marker
gyro compass with heading hold selector
autopilot

This is for the multi-engined birds, the 109s just have a simple whiskey compass on the dashboard, i think the Stuka also has a repeater compass. The gyro compass with heading hold marker is used how you tell the autopilot your desired heading to keep and can be found on the 110, 111 and 88.

So, let's assume we're flying a Ju88.

The magnetic compass is the big round thing with the plane silhouette in the middle, hanging below the middle of your instrument panel (in the 111 you can find it on the right hand side cockpit wall). To read it, you either hover the mouse cursor over it and look at the tooltip, or look for the red triangle in the periphery. It's the triangle that indicates your magnetic heading. To set a course, move the course setter and the plane silhouette will move. Turn until the plane silhouette is aligned with the triangle to get on course.

The repeater compass can usually be found on the instrument panel and it has a very useful property: it's as accurate as the magnetic one, in fact they seem to be linked for all intents and purposes in the sim, so you can almost entirely forget about the magnetic compass and use that one. This makes getting a magnetic heading for calibrating your gyro compass a lot easier in the German aircraft, because it's right in front of you. It also makes it very easy to navigate "by hand" because it has a course setter too. When you move the course setter for your magnetic compass, it moves on the repeater compass as well. It's pretty simple again, the plane silhouette in the middle points to your actual heading and the top to bottom line on the outer disk of the instrument signifies your intended heading, you just turn until they align and you're set.


The gyro compass is the instrument with the two horizontally rotating compass cards. The top row is your current heading, which you need to calibrate the usual way: get the heading from the magnetic or repeater compass and input it into the gyro compass.

An important thing to note here is that the game features magnetic deviation similar to the one found over the Channel during 1940. In other words, your magnetic heading is always 10 degrees off and you have to add/subtract 10 degrees before calibrating your gyro compass, or just take it into account if you only navigate with magnetic/repeater compass. Sadly, i don't remember if the deviation is east or west, so i don't know if your true heading is magnetic + 10 degrees or magnetic - 10 degrees.

In the RAF aircraft the gyro compass is pretty much essential for navigation because it's the easiest nav instrument to see on the panel. In the German aircraft you can ignore it pretty much and use the repeater compass. However, there is one reason to learn and use the gyro compass in German aircraft too: the autopilot is "fed" data from it.

To use the autopilot, you first calibrate your gyro compass with your true heading (align the top compass card). Then, trim your aircraft for straight and level flight and let it settle for a few seconds. By using the "autopilot left/right" commands, you can now rotate the bottom compass card of the instrument. This compass card is the heading you want the autopilot to keep, let's call it the heading hold selector. Take note, the comparison is made between heading hold selector and gyro compass, not the other compasses. If i'm flying east but my gyro is wrongly calibrated to read north and i set the heading hold selector to east, instead of flying straight and level like i want it to, the aircraft will turn 90 degrees to the right and face south the moment i engage autopilot. The autopilot only sees the difference between gyro compass and heading hold selector, so if any of those is off you get wrong results.


So, if my top compass card in my gyro compass is calibrated at 90 degrees (due east) and i rotate the bottom compass card (the heading hold selector) to also read 90 degrees and then engage autopilot, the aircraft should keep flying straight and level at that direction. What happened in practice when i last had a chance to fly the sim, is that there's an offset of 5-7 degrees. In other words, the instrument face for the example i used (flying due east) should look like this:

----E---- *gyro compass
----E---- *heading hold selector

but the setting that keeps the aircraft flying straight is more like this:

----E----
------E--

I don't know if this is a realistic limitation of the system or a bug and if it's been corrected in the meantime, but it's easy to account for, just rotate your heading selector a bit more to the right before engaging autopilot. Also take note that there are two AP modes. I don't know what the second one is for, probably for use with radio navigation beacons, but you only need the course autopilot setting for this method (kurzsteurung i think it's labelled on the panel in German).

So, if you know all this, you should be able to climb in a He111 or Bf110 and fly hands off to the target area. The 110 also has a big red button on the instrument panel, which servers as a temporary "autopilot bypass". Say one of your wingmen is venturing close and you need to evade, click and hold on the red button and kick some rudder, then stop clicking on the button and the AP will steer you back on your chosen course. You can still fight the controls against the AP of course, but i don't know if this messes up the gyros or anything.

A known bug back then also existed in the Ju88. The gyro compass wouldn't rotate (it just stayed where you would set it and not respond to your turns), which made it impossible to use steering via autopilot. I don't know if this has been corrected.

However, last time i checked it worked fine for the Bf110 and the He111 (with the 5-7 degree offset caveat mentioned before) and you can use this to level bomb. If you calibrate the gyro, set your heading hold selector and engage AP you can then make small corrections and steer the aircraft via autopilot. Just by briefly tapping your "autopilot left/right" keys to rotate the heading hold selector a couple of degrees at a time, you can make small course corrections while you are on the bomb run and looking through the sights. This is pretty much how it was done in real life for the most part too.

As a final note, keep in mind that the AP doesn't make coordinated turns and it doesn't take altitude changes into account, so it's better to only steer via AP when small course corrections are needed. If you rotate your heading hold selector more than 10-15 degrees at a time while the AP is engaged the aircraft will bank somewhat steeply, overshoot the target heading, turn the other way, overshoot it again and make a series of zig-zagging turns before settling on the chosen heading, not to mention losing altitude in the process because the AP has no control over your elevators. Not a good course of action if you are flying a bomber and you have wingmen in formation with you biggrin

However, using it to keep the bomber straight and level while you aim the bombs is perfectly possible and i've had some pretty good results with the 111 while doing practice bombing runs.

Hope this helps wink

#3481865 - 12/27/11 08:26 AM Re: Navigation tips. [Re: Blackdog_kt]  
Joined: Mar 2011
Posts: 82
jimbop Offline
Junior Member
jimbop  Offline
Junior Member

Joined: Mar 2011
Posts: 82
Australia
Good to see you around, Blackdog. We were discussing the course autopilot in another thread ( Level bombing in the Blenheim) and wishing it was present in the Blenheim! At least calibrating gyro to compass is easier in that aircraft since you can go to the bombardier's seat for a good compass view.


Custom magnetic stick, control box and pedals | EVGA GTX480 superclock | i7 2600k @ 4.5 | GA-P67A-UD4-B3 | 8GB DDR3 1666 Corsair Vengeance | Antec 1200W TruePower | Windows 7 64-bit | FT clip + modded Logitech Fusion
#3501766 - 01/23/12 06:31 PM Re: Navigation tips. [Re: Bokononist]  
Joined: Aug 2003
Posts: 1,555
ATAG_Tonester Offline
Member
ATAG_Tonester  Offline
Member

Joined: Aug 2003
Posts: 1,555
Perth West Aust
Awesome thread...will be very handy when i figure out how NOT to fry my merlin..haha...the
realism of this sim is a very hard task master, but is truly the biggest edge it has over '46...well that, the graphics,
the flight models etc...this is way more of a simulation than 46 ever was


i7 960 3.2 GHz LGA
ASUS Sabretooth X58
2 x 60 Gb OCZ Vertex 2 60Gb SSD (Stripe/Raid 0)
3 x 1 Tb Sata HDD
12Gb 1600 MHz DDR3
ATI XFX Radeon HD 5870 1Gb
Benq 24" Monitor
Viewsonic 19" Monitor
Thrustmaster Cougar HOTAS
Saitek Pro Quadrant
Saitek Pro Flight Yoke & Throttle Quadrant
Saitek Radio Panel
Saitek Multi Panel
Saitek Pro Pedals
CH Throttle Quadrant
TrackIR3 Pro
#3502400 - 01/24/12 01:51 PM Re: Navigation tips. [Re: Bokononist]  
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 82
bradleydog62 Offline
Junior Member
bradleydog62  Offline
Junior Member

Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 82
Allen,TX
Many thanks Blackdog!!Flew RoF for several weeks and missed your post. Your response should be in the "Sticky" topics for all to refer to and perhaps enlarge upon with additional experience. I would really like to see the Stuka dive bomb technique subject site too.I have been going to German websites for help and found one article says the Kurssterung should not be used until above 300 meters. The Ju87 has auto dive pullout set switch under the gauage for precise altitude upper left panal. I am not sure if it opens the dive breaks when pushed..will go back and fiddle with it. Acutally, I refer to my learning technique as "Blundering". The manual sure misses alot of info and setting up topic "stickys" would help everyone. Thank you, John

#3502440 - 01/24/12 02:45 PM Re: Navigation tips. [Re: Bokononist]  
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 82
bradleydog62 Offline
Junior Member
bradleydog62  Offline
Junior Member

Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 82
Allen,TX
I forgot to add the "Course Autopilot..adjust course" device. On left side up near cockpit edge. Switch designed to be used with gloves making adjusting course easier. My limited CoD experience suggests the German design superior to British. Yes, possible to get used to anything but thinking in terms of the time and energy to do a task, add the horrors of combat and wounds, and the emotional impact on thinking I prefer the German system completely. I think the Germans may have allowed the pilots to tell the engineers how they wanted the system to work. Just idle thoughts and I need to apply Blackdog's user guide now.

#3514027 - 02/08/12 05:33 AM Re: Navigation tips. [Re: Bokononist]  
Joined: Aug 2002
Posts: 4,010
PV1 Offline
sometime mudslinger
PV1  Offline
sometime mudslinger
Senior Member

Joined: Aug 2002
Posts: 4,010
Ladner, Wet Coast, Canada
Seconding the post above - I was waiting, even prior to that, expecting stickiness
to be applied to this thread, but as it hasn't yet I'd like to suggest that this
topic be stickied, or linked from a stickied topic such as the faq post. It is of
great usefulness, and much of the information is applicable beyond this sim.

#3569357 - 05/08/12 01:13 PM Re: Navigation tips. [Re: Bokononist]  
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 257
Itkovian Offline
Member
Itkovian  Offline
Member

Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 257
Thank you, I'm just getting into CloD and was wondering about the compass and directional gyro. I'll be sure to follow this procedure from now on (I'm getting in the Wicks vs Dundas campaigns, and am a manual navigation nutter, so this was vital for me *grin*).

Itkovian

Page 1 of 2 1 2

Moderated by  RacerGT 

Quick Search
Recent Articles
Support SimHQ

If you shop on Amazon use this Amazon link to support SimHQ
.
Social


Recent Topics
Anyone use VoiceAtttack?
by bones. 02/21/20 01:50 PM
Fanatical Platinum Bundle
by Red2112. 02/21/20 12:21 PM
Raising the Kursk
by CyBerkut. 02/20/20 11:09 PM
Borderlands the movie?
by PanzerMeyer. 02/20/20 07:41 PM
Post script on our fires
by Mad Max. 02/19/20 09:43 PM
Our current approaching storm
by Ajay. 02/19/20 12:35 PM
Just a little feel good flying thing
by Nixer. 02/18/20 12:37 AM
Now, This is Cool (Even if it WAS a Dog)
by vonBaur. 02/18/20 12:37 AM
Copyright 1997-2016, SimHQ Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.6.0