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REPORTS FROM THE FRONT

Posted By: Olham

REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/23/15 10:46 PM

Perhaps the devs will read this and make us a new "sticky thread", as we had it in the old forum,
called "Reports from the Front". And even if not - feel free to post your adventures in here too,
then it will always get bumped up onto page 1.

*** *** *** *** *** *** ***

2nd Lieutenant Haynes had a rather unpleasant 'adventure' with No. 46 today, and it will keep him
off the duty board for at least a week. But let's see his latest entry from his diary.

"We were flying south along the road to Lens, when I sighted a single German scout - one of those
new Albatros V-strutters - crossing our course ca. 3000 feet ahead and lower, from right to left.
They do not cross the lines very often, and this flyer was even all on his own - what a chance!
First I was only just amazed about the look of the aircraft; it had an appearance like a peregrine
falcon, a beautiful shape of both, wings and fuselage. The body was of bright plywood; the tailplane
was painted white, with a big Iron Cross on the fin and rudder.
Then I waved towards Kay and Dimmock to assign the enemy - when they swung round left already.
Great, I thought and pushed the stick, to get at the enemy plane.
I had no idea, that Kay had spotted a flight of DFW C.V further away, and led the flight there.

I tried in vain to catch up with "my German" - the distance between us wouldn't shrink.
Then I saw the 5 DFW coming towards me, only 300 feet higher than me. I climbed towards them.
I saw our flight to my left and much higher up - they would surely engage too.
So I took the left two-seater under fire. As they began passing me, I went into a steep right turn,
firing again and again, until I got behind the big craft. But I was too close!
Without any irritation they flew on straight, and now their observers opened their fire on me!
I heard and felt several impacts on wood and in canvas - Zzipp! Zapp! Shrak!! Tock-tock!!!

And then I got hit. The bullet entered my right leg short above the knee and got stuck somewhere in
the middle of my tigh. The stinging pain was very strange, like electric or like a poised bee sting,
only much bigger. I felt awfully sick.
Immediately I broke off and turned away from the Huns. Within seconds, my whole body felt very cold,
except for my leg. Warm blood was running along the tigh and soaked my trousers which I was wearing
under the thick flying suit. I could not check the wound, but I was sure it was quite heavy - I felt
the blood running out, soaking my pants more and more, and panik came up.
What if the loss of blood would make me faint?
I couldn't help it - I pulled down my scarf and had to vomit overboard.

I pushed the stick forwards; I had to get down to the ground as quick as possible!
I saw a bigger town south of me and I realised I was already as far as Arras. I checked my map.
Mont Saint-Eloi was the closest field for me, and I reached it. Meanwhile, I was sure I had
lost more than five pints of blood! When does a man faint from blood loss?

Somehow I managed to fly over the hangars and put the kite down in the middle of the field.
Then I must have fainted for a bit, cause the next I saw was me on a surgical table, with three medics
and several curious pilots around me.
"Ah, there you are, old chap! Stay with us! You had a little shock! What's your name?"
I told it. "Unit? Age?" I got anxiously and got angry.
"Wanna know my granny's girl name?! Can you save my leg?" I bellowed from a sore dry throat.
"Your leg? No, we had to take it off!" said the doctor.
I almost fainted again, but he saw my dispair and clapped my cheek.
"Hey, hey, there, there! It is nothing! Just a grazing shot, all along your tigh.
Be happy - a little more centered, it could have hit more valuable parts!"
The pilots around me all laughed, which I found utterly misguided! But then one feller came with a big
glass of brandy, which I drank - with the doctor's order - at one big gulp.
It helped drowning some of the embarrassment which I felt now - the others must have thought I was a Sissy.
But it really DID feel like a large amount of blood lost.

Oh, well, these fellers will soon be left behind - in ten days I may be fit for flying again.
And I swear to myself: I will have much more respect from two-seater formations from now on.

Kay didn't give me any brushing down. He only said in a very calm, warm and friendly way:
"Boy, you could have been dead. Never leave the formation again, okay?"
It worked much more on me than any harsh words, and I will try never to let my leader down again."




Posted By: MFair

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/23/15 11:09 PM

Nice read Olham, Lt. Haynes will be more cautious next time I am sure.
Posted By: CatKnight

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/23/15 11:23 PM

VERY nice Olham! I loved that scene.
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/24/15 12:51 AM

Great story, glad their aim was a hair off.
Posted By: ArisFuser

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/24/15 08:59 AM

Great read, specially liked the way you described the effects and feelings on your injured pilot. Thanks for posting.
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/24/15 10:50 AM

Thank you all, gents!

And as I said: should be nice if you'd post some own reports here occasionally.
Posted By: RAF_Louvert

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/24/15 12:19 PM

.

A very good report Olham, and super screenies too. But yet another thread I need to go to to see what folks are up to?! dizzy I can't stay current with all the ones we have as it is.

.
Posted By: CatKnight

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/25/15 03:22 AM

No screenies, alas, but hopefully I can describe it.


June 10, 1917

Father.

Today, I killed a man in cold blood. Duty says I had no choice, but I am not so sure. It goes against everything you taught me. There was no glory in it, and I can only wonder what I could have - should have done differently.

I led a flight of five in a simple patrol to La Selve, an aerodrome only an hour or two's walk from here. Baumer was on my wing: You remember, the tall man with the greasy hair who came on leave with me in April. We flew Albatros scouts. I'm sure you've heard the rumors about their wings being fragile, but I assure you I've had no trouble nor have my men.

In no time at all we were some two kilometers over La Selve circling slowly in the warm, morning light. Few clouds, the sun bright somewhere over Berlin, the breeze slanting into the cockpit a welcome relief from the humidity. Then I saw three French built SPADs some distance above us. We saw them first and climbed, but soon they realized their error and turned to engage.

It was beautiful, father. I wish you could have seen it. So often in these engagements it's over in the first seconds: One side has the disadvantage and dives or runs. This was mutual, and for several minutes we all climbed, dove, turned and danced around each other. One tried to get behind me, but a controlled spin took care of that. I fired on one until he drifted out of range with one of my cohorts in pursuit, turned on a second until he passed under me, then found my target.

He was a plain enough looking SPAD: Brown canvas, and at my angle I couldn't see any insignia. He had the speed advantage and I fired somewhat haphazardly hoping for the best. I must have hit the engine from behind at 600 meters, for a thick stream of black, oily smoke arced back in my direction. He ran of course, and most of my shots were futile gestures.

He ran out of oil. His engine began sputtering and I closed the distance rapidly. He was in a hopeless situation, some ten or fifteen kilometers behind the front lines and should of landed. Instead he ran, and so I shredded him at sixty meters: Great holes appeared in his wings, chunks of wood flew from his fuselage. Surely, I thought, he'd realize the futility of his situation.

No.

As I turned, the Frenchman was hurt badly. He could barely keep aloft. His nose would jerk up for a bit, then fall away like a wounded bird. I watched him for a moment, waiting for a signal of surrender, but it never came.

It was with a heavy heart then I came around for another pass, lining up behind him and slowing down to give him time to realize his predicament. Still the crippled SPAD rose, dipped, rose again, sputtered, dipped.

I waited as long as I could, father. If he had tried to land. If he'd lost his engine. Hell and Death, if he had simply signalled....but he did not. He kept trying to leave, and that I could not allow. I hoped one more burst, perhaps knock away a spar or disable his engine, would break through.

Thirty meters. I fired and spun away. I think I saw the spray of blood, though perhaps that's my imagination. Regardless, by the time I swung around he was in a terminal dive.

You taught me never to hit a man from behind. You taught me never to hit a man once he was beat. Now I have done both, and rather than censure me or ignore it, my squad wants to celebrate my 'victory.'

What in the name of God has happened to war?
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/25/15 11:27 AM

Originally Posted By: RAF_Louvert
.
...yet another thread I need to go to to see what folks are up to?! dizzy
I can't stay current with all the ones we have as it is.

That's why I thought a REPORTS... thread would be good, to collect all flyers' single
adventures and reports in one thread.
But you must not read everyhing, must we? I don't read such threads when I don't have
enough time; and then I may miss many stories.
But hey - we're not obliged to read the WHOLE forum, EVERY post - are we?
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/25/15 11:30 AM

Just realised: this is in the "stickies" now - thank you, whoever did this!
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/25/15 01:06 PM

JUST A SUGGESTION:

We currently have a thread called "WOFF V2 Videos Thread" which currently is being used to post not only Videos but combat reports that go with them. I would like to suggest that when posting a mission report with supporting video / screen caps that we use Olham's new thread and leave the "WOFF V2 Videos Thread" for just plain video reporting experiences that do not have supporting mission reports. This is of course for non DiD missions.

There is no point in having two threads with the same intent.
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/25/15 02:01 PM

October 22, 1918
Jasta 15, Verdun

Fritz is back in action after a 2 week hospital stay. His patched up DVII F and six squad mates were waiting for him to lead a flight of Hanovers on a short bomb run. No problems findingg the bombers.


No EA encountered during the bomb run and the Hanovers finally headed back towards home.



After the Hanovers entered a landing pattern Fritz headed for home in the fading light. As they approached their home airfield, Stenay, flak was spotted. Fritz decided it was best to not engage and took his flight down low before landing in the dark.

Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/25/15 03:17 PM

Geez MudWasp, are there any Hun aircraft still on the ground!! jawdrop
Posted By: OldHat

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/25/15 05:00 PM

25 Sqn. RFC patrol missions over the ammunition dump at Audruicq on the Calais-St. Omer railway. Same route every day for the rest of March 1916. I'm getting used to flying this truck and dogfighting in it.





Besides dogfighting, the hardest part is keeping formation inside the clouds.

Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/25/15 06:39 PM

You don't have to worry about being captured!
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/25/15 06:49 PM

Frizt had decent weather for escorting another Hannover CIII flight, but this was a recce run. Good thing he took a full fuel load as many laps of the circuit were flown.



No EA encountered and all went well, except for who ever "landed" this plane while he was gone.
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/25/15 07:05 PM

Originally Posted By: CatKnight
... If he had tried to land. If he'd lost his engine. Hell and Death, if he had simply signalled....but he did not.

A painful dilemma many soldiers must have gone through.
Made them sick and hate themselves (like Otto Fuchs seemed to feel after his first kill) -
and yet many of them overcame it and carried on (like Fuchs also).
The name of the first victim of war is 'Innocence'.
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/26/15 11:05 AM

Oct 23rd 1918
Jasta 15, Stenay Verdun

Balloon defense today


As they arrived near the balloon flak smoke was spotted down low. Fritz and crew dropped down to say hello and a large DF was on.



Jasta 15 handled the 5 SPADS well and eventually rtb. Long lines of trucks were traveling the roads near Stenay. "Heading to the front or retreating?", Fritz asked himself.


Fritz filed a claim, had it rejected due to the chaos of the DF, and was then informed he was promoted!
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/26/15 11:31 AM

Congrats on your promotion, MudWasp. Yeah, the D.VII is a great easy-to-fly fighter.
Will you enetually receive the D.VII F (high altitude version with the strong BMW engine)?
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/26/15 11:50 AM

That is what I currently have... the DVII F
Recently transfered from Jasta 80b based in northern Alsace and was flying the DVII OAW down there. The "F" certainly has more power, and a throatier growl to it's engine sound.

I may have to transfer closer to the Chanel if Fritz's objective of shooting down anything other than SPAD XIIIs is to be realized. But I rather like Jasta 15, maybe we will stay put...IDK...there is just about 3 weeks of flying left for him.
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/26/15 12:29 PM

Do you need an additional command for "high altitude throttle" in the D.VII F,
or is that all on the one throttle?
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/26/15 12:32 PM

IDK...I haven't been adding any commands...I'll have to check in QC while I mull over a Jasta 2 transfer.

Back from checking. I couldn't find any such command. If I missed it, some one let me know.
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/26/15 03:20 PM

Oct 24th 1918
Stenay, Verdun. Jasta 15

This was like an old OFF P3 scramble mission!



Fritz had just turned from lifting off and spotted flak and two SPAD XIIIs down low over the forest near tree top level! The camo pattern worked well as he almost flew into them, fired a burst at one, and looked out to his tail and watched the DF break out.



He cirled back into the DF



Located his victim and sent that SPAD down



Fritz regrouped his flight and they went on to fly airfield defense without any other enemy encounters before rtb.
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/26/15 05:12 PM

What do you want for breakfast, Herr Leutnant - SPAD VII or SPAD XIII?
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/26/15 09:16 PM

At this stage of the war in Alsace and Verdun, it is SPAD XIIIs only for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/27/15 01:20 PM

Oct 25th 1918, Mission 46
Jasta 15, Stenay Verdun

On a crisp fall morning Fritz is tasked with patroling enemy lines and is leading a flight of 4 Fokker DVII F.



They were still climbing to their cruising altitude near Stenay when flak smoke alerted them to the presence of enemy airplanes above them.



Fritz continued to climb and kept distance between his flight and the flak until he had altitude advantage. Then he dove on the enemy, which turned out to be three SPAD XIIIs. They turned to face the attack and Fritz peppered the lead SPAD heavily causing it to break off. Fritz lined up on it's tail, hammered it at very close range and sent it spinning out of control. At one moment it almost crashed into Fritz as it spun in tight circles.


He watched the SPAD tumble to the ground and evaluated the DF. One SPAD still up high was losing to two of his squadmates, a one on one was going on down low. He watched the spinning SPAD crash and dove to help out in the DF down low.




The DF above him was soon over and another flaming SPAD streaked down to the ground. Fritz regrouped his flight and decided to fly cap above his airfield and surrounding areas instead of patroling into enemy territory. No flak spotted, no more EA encountered, all rtb and landed.
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/27/15 02:00 PM

Peel the SPADs, Fritz! laser
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/27/15 02:11 PM

He is quite the Spad killer. I looked into the manual deployment section and found some DVII F options in Flanders, but the transfer section of the intel page doesn't show those squads as available. Fritz will stick with his exclusive SPAD diet until he dies from it or the war is over.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/27/15 10:53 PM

Not much longer to the Armistice!

And I guess I need an opinion from fellow WOFF'ers.
I normally post in the Screenshot thread pics and a short synopsis of the mission and how my career is going.
Would this be better suited here and leave the Scrrenshot thread for pics only?
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/27/15 11:02 PM

Feel free to post where you want to, Duke - there are no rules for that.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/27/15 11:09 PM

Well this place feels more cozy for my style of "half pics/half narrative" posts so I think I will set up shop here and join my pals.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/28/15 10:50 AM

Monday April 16, 1917. Major Tobias, a fairly new arrival to the squadron, leads B Flight on a patrol.
For a long while there is no enemy seen. I believe this is confirming my suspicion that because the Hun is evil he cannot fly in the sun - not that we have had a lot of sun this time of year!

Or maybe he is being crowded out of the sky. Lots of RFC gadding about.


Suddenly the flight dives toward the trenches. Figuring they must be bored and are going the strafe the Hun trenches I follow along but nope. A lone Hun is flying very low over the lines. He picked a bad day for sightseeing as B Flight goes after him like a marlin after a squid.
That's me right behind him and we are almost going straight down. I manage a couple of hits but the ground is awful close so I break off. He is finally finished off by our new Major apparently who puts in a claim for him.


The flight leader, being a new guy, decides to reform low and over a Hun infantry position. I plan to put up with this noob move until the ground fire starts but, besides a few stray shots, it never does. Are the Hun gunners being suppressed by the artillery fire? That's what I tell myself when after a couple of circles we fly to a more reasonable altitude.


Everyone returns safe and the Major claims one.
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/28/15 11:15 AM

Geeze, the second picture is the sheer horror for an Albatros pilot ... !
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/28/15 11:18 AM

Saturday April 21, 1917 leading a B Flight patrol on a DOP. Several days I was assigned as flight leader (17th and the 20th) but the patrols were rained out and apparently we had a couple of days off. Wish someone would have told me I would have gone to town on a bender!

Typical weather it seems for a flight to the front.


Flying over Hunland for a while all is quiet till I spot 4 or 5 specks flying low and circling. I then see the airfield. Huns landing or taking off. Perfect! This should be easy right? I order the attack.
Turns out they are two-seaters and I pick one out, and trying to avoid the observer, only manage a couple of hits when he lights up. I would like to think my shooting is that good but I see airplane pieces fluttering downward. I think one of my boys rammed him. Look for another target and see another flamer streaking across the sky - I think its a Se5.


Join HA Maxwell, in his distinctive paint job as he drives this enemy to his final landing.


No more enemy planes in sight so I circle around waiting for my flight to form back up but I am only joined by Maxwell. Looking back I see four flaming funeral pyres on the ground...uh oh.


In a attempt to salvage this disaster I come across this balloon on the way home and Maxwell watches as I set it alight.


Back at base Maxwell and I file our claims. He for two Hun aircraft and me for my balloon. Three flight members are missing and down. In a slight glimmer of hope in my flight leadership catastrophe all three are HA's and work their magic and return to the squadron - minus their destroyed Se's of course. Hopefully the CO won't hold a grudge as my balloon will be Victory #10 if confirmed.
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/28/15 11:18 AM

I avoid flying low over the front like that. Sometimes it is quiet, but on other days it can erupt in gunfire.
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/28/15 11:39 AM

Maxwell and his painted plane stand out nicely. Two seaters...killed many of my AI squadmates.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/28/15 11:51 AM

Yes they are quite deadly!
So much so I prefer combat against single seaters. I have given up entirely approaches from the rear (realistically enough I suppose) and have been trying head-on and the 10:00 to 2:00 position on them.
The AI though, being eager beavers, are not quite so subtle.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/28/15 11:52 AM

Originally Posted By: Olham
Geeze, the second picture is the sheer horror for an Albatros pilot ... !


And I can feel it having been in that position too many times!
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/28/15 07:13 PM

Flew on Sunday the 22nd as flight leader escorting 5 Fee's on a bombing run but the weather was horrible so no contact. 56 Squadron, now getting the hang of their new aircraft, have been switched to "High" mission frequency per the Ready Room so things should heat up in the coming days - weather allowing of course.

Today its Monday, April 23, 1917. Flying a DOP with B Flight and Captain Ball is leading. About 5 miles back I am lolly gagging along when the flight jumps like a frog on a hot plate. I fly, make a circle, look around, and see nothing. Now fly to catch up to my flightmates when I glance over my shoulder and see an Alb just out of firing range. Give the Se the spurs and with a little dive get out of range and turn to fight him. Just lining up for a shot when the rest of the flight arrives to help and shoots him down. I follow him down to make sure he is not faking and he hits the ground and explodes. Looking for my flight I see them high up and head toward them. After a moment I see three specks off to my left at my level apparently also trying to join my flight. B Flight is an exclusive club and we don't allow Huns as Huns they were. I head for the one in the rear and manage a fairly good deflection shot that changes his plans and he attempts to maneuver.

Well, well, a green tail. I wonder if Olham is up this early?


My flight keeps the other two occupied and I finish this one off. Right after I feel a smack of ground fire and make for the lines.


Back at base I see my wingman is reported missing at first but luckily he latter returns to base minus his Se which he crashed somewhere in British territory. He is quite the pilot with almost as many victories as me.
I put in a claim for my kill (#11) and the flight claims three others.
Dirty Green Tails! Olham! OvS! I am coming for you!
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/29/15 10:45 AM

Using SOGriffin"s idea for a "Aces 1" mod I start a new career for testing. All is working perfectly. Start with J11 as a Leutnant and am assigned, like everyone else in the Jasta, a DIII (Early).
Saturday, April 7, 1917. Morning patrol with Kette 2 in defense of our forward airfields. The Britishers have been awful active lately. Wonder what their up too?
Kette 2 forms up. We are being led by Germany's ONLY ace so we had better make sure nothing happens to him.


Arrive at the threatened field and circle. I see some very low and distant AA bursts but no one else does. Kette 1 is tagging along behind us. More circles when I see more AA and see a formation of 4 aircraft pass about 2,000' below us. No one makes a move so to impress the Jasta Fuehrer I dive to attack. No one follows of course as I am not the leader. As I close on their rear they begin to peel up to meet me and I see the aluminum dope. Neiuports! Lt. DIH may be new but he is not stupid - well not too stupid anyway. Not liking these odds, and while still with a altitude advantage, I use my dive speed and zoom up and reverse. The enemy gives chase. I am holding my own in keeping them at a distance so I plan to lead them back to my Jasta to settle their hash.


Genius plan with one major flaw. Where the heck did Kette 1 and 2 get too? I am all alone and the enemy is relentless in their pursuit. This pursuit goes on for so long I actually glance at my fuel level. Try some clouds but the big ones are never around when you need them and all I encounter are tissue thin. The French (as it is revealed getting these shots as I fly without aids) must have had too much wine for breakfast as they chase me about 35 KM behind the lines. I start to wonder if I can claim all four thinking they may not have enough fuel, eventually!, to re-cross the lines. One by one they finally break off till it is just me and one Frenchman. I quickly turn and make a head-on pass, maybe get some hits because in the turn fight I get the upper hand!


How does it feel eh?


My shooting is good but not perfect. I hit his engine and he is leaking oil. A couple more passes and he nose-dives and crashes in a cloud of dust. Huzzah!


Back at base I find that everyone has already landed and is at breakfast. MvR is happy with my claim but not so much about me leaving the formation. He doesn't hold a grudge though as I am scheduled for a afternoon patrol. My claim is filed for a N23 (not sure the difference visually between the 23 and 17) and it is pending.
Posted By: OldHat

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/29/15 11:00 AM

Man, where have I been?? This thread's gettin' busy.... Duke, you switchin' sides so fast, the war will be over before its time....no more planes left to fly. ar15

I've been taking it easy with 25 RFC and trying to follow them one day at a time. Here's a short video I put together because I ain't any good at writing reports....

Best viewed in Full HD to see my commentary.

Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/29/15 01:13 PM

"Ace in the hole" haha!
Nice video and it looks even more polished then your last one.

AI gunners can be frustrating. They will only fire (as you saw) if the plane is banked to a certain level. Probably big climbs and dive also I imagine. Once you straightened out oh so slightly he opened back up.
I have actually never seen the gunner animation in action before. Very nice work by OBD.

When I fly my Brisfit my gunner rarely shoots as I am always hoicking around.
Posted By: Hauksbee

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/29/15 04:16 PM

Originally Posted By: OldHat
Here's a short video I put together because I ain't any good at writing reports....

I especially liked switching over to the E.III's POV. You should video some more E.III action and splice it in, seeing as you dogged him for so long.
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/29/15 04:29 PM

Oldhat; Wonderful little production Sir!! thumbsup
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/29/15 06:13 PM

OldHat, that was real funny!
I guess I would have kicked Phil out of my plane for his stubbornness!

"Shoot!" - "No!" - Mmuahahahahaaa!!!
Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/29/15 08:17 PM

I second Olham, that was one of the best videos I've seen. salute
Posted By: OldHat

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/29/15 08:35 PM

Thanks Gents! salute

I'll try you suggestion next time Hauksbee. Seems like a good explanation to me, Duke.

Olham, Yeah, probably would have done it if the game had that option. biggrin
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/29/15 11:34 PM

The continuing service of Ernst Ziegler:



19 Mar 1917 @ 08h06 Patrol of our lines east of Bapaume to Havincourt Wood

We had clear weather with haze in the distance and winds at 3 kn from the SW.
I lead the flight with Berr, Theiller, Gontermann, Sturm and Bussing accompanying. “Eins” flight sent Schneider, Baevers and Huber as top cover.

The flight to the lines was quiet but just as we arrived there I spotted 5 specs on the horizon and slightly lower than us approaching head on. I signaled to engage and so the dance began. I had several bursts on two different Nieup 17’s which crossed my path while I was in pursuit of one craft. They were from Esc 67. I managed to down one of the enemy craft and continued on circling for others to engage. The skies cleared quickly and I was only able to locate two other of my squad. I signaled to rejoin and just as we accomplished this Berr broke formation heading towards Pronville, the nearest aerodrome. I elected to follow him and as we arrived over the field I saw that Berr’s prop had stopped spinning. He made a forced landing just south of the field destroying his craft but was only lightly wounded for the effort. Bussing and I landed together safely.
I reported in to the RO lodging my claim and indicating the Berr also got one and asked to have him picked up. Later that day the reports came in that Theiller’s craft had suffered light damage and was forced down; Gontermann had destroyed his craft in a crash and was lightly wounded; Sturm had destroyed his craft and was only shookup but claimed one Nieup; and Huber of “Eins” flight had suffered heavy damage to his craft but was un-injured.

All in all we suffered the loss of three craft and damage to two other for the effort of downing 3 Nieuport 17’s. Not good results overall.

YouTube Video:
Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/30/15 02:36 AM

Was that a cloud apparently stuck on the ground at the end of your video? I've never seen anything like that.
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/30/15 10:16 AM

Originally Posted By: SOGriffin
Was that a cloud apparently stuck on the ground at the end of your video? I've never seen anything like that.


I suspect you are correct. It is the first time I have ever seen thar. I first though to myself "wow they have put in ground fog!". It looked kind of cool.
Posted By: OldHat

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/30/15 10:29 AM

Yeah, at first I thought it looked like it might be fog, but it had definate edges to it like a cloud.... weird.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/30/15 10:47 AM

I have not seen the video yet but the use of ground smoke and gas attacks are modeled into the game.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/31/15 05:46 PM

21 Oct 1916
Loki Duselldorf
Jasta 5


Started off as a routine flight of 3 a/c ( Halb D-2s) in local area. As our Schwarm entered landing mode, 2/ 3 wing Sopwiths bounced my machine wounding me. Plot health was at 73 % so landed.


upload photo


screen shot windows 7


uploadimage
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/31/15 08:49 PM

Originally Posted By: SOGriffin
Was that a cloud apparently stuck on the ground at the end of your video? I've never seen anything like that.


Watching the video finally that had the look of a graphics "quiggle."
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/31/15 09:46 PM

How do you like the Halb. DII carrick58?
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/01/15 03:18 AM

MudWasp:

The Only thing, I can say is that I will be happy to get an Albatross. wave
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/01/15 10:57 AM

Sure, an Albatros D.II is a huge improvement; the twin guns alone.
But the Halberstadt is not bad; it can even hold it's own against the DH.2.
Good luck, Carrick!
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/01/15 01:11 PM

Originally Posted By: carrick58
MudWasp:

The Only thing, I can say is that I will be happy to get an Albatross. wave


Yeah, I was too yep
Don't forget there is a Halb. DIII, visibility forward is a little better due to less plumbing. Seems a tad more powerful to me, but I think that is all in my head.
Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/01/15 05:39 PM

I usually hate the ground attack missions, but my last one was really cool. Normally, Flight A will fly top cover for Flight B while we get to do the dirty work, but today Flight A took part in the attack. We had eleven Sopwith Tripes pounding on the poor foot soldiers. During our attack we had three Albatri fly over and I'm sure they were saying, "Nothing to see here". biggrin

Here are some screenshots of the fun.



and one more.

Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/01/15 06:41 PM

Had some fun in the DR one....





Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/01/15 10:49 PM



Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/01/15 10:49 PM

3 Nov 1916
Loki Duselldorf
Jasta 5


I was impressed. Went out on a Jasta 5 Sqn patrol and encountered Fe2b,s. The schwarms made a long port turn then the fireworks began. Knocked down all 5 Tommy machines. I got off 2 long bursts missed then stalled.


picture upload sites




image hosting more than 5mb


upload a picture
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/02/15 10:27 AM

Thursday, April 5 1917. First patrol with Jasta 11 using the "Aces DIH" mod. This mod, based on the work of SOGriffin and OldHat, has no Allied aces and only a few select German aces. Mission is a Line Patrol near Cambrai.

Morning flight to the front with Kette Zwei led by MvR. Typical early April weather, cold and grey, and we lose Kette Eins in the murk. Never saw them again.


At the front we circle and fly around, see some distant specks, but nothing for a while. Just when I think it is going to be a no contact patrol MvR dives onto a group of about 7 enemy aircraft that I didn't see until our patrol leader did. All of a sudden there are several formations around but I don't know if they are friend or foe.
The Kette dives for the attack. DH2's! Despite all my April Jasta time this is only my second or third encounter with them ever.


As I remember the old pushers are quite maneuverable, and he is, but not quite enough to save him. I land a few hits, nothing major, but either killed the pilot or blew out his controls as he plunges to his doom just behind the Britisher main trench line. Huzzah!


See LvR shoot one down out of control that I was also making for as he was on the tail of a comrade. Also saw a unknown flamer that was probably a DH2 as there were two Albs behind it.
Circle around to join up and I see LvR make a beeline for a friendly airfield apparently damaged. Notice MvR and another chasing some unknown foe straight west but, being an old hand now, do not join in the target fixation that may go on for miles. Set a course for my field and see, off to my left, another DH2 being chased by German flak bursts but he is a little higher then me and going hell for leather so I continue on my way. While enroute back the normally reliable Mercedes suffers a breakdown. Check my map and make for a unknown friendly field. Just as I am getting ready to turn into the final approach, and quite low, the engine fails all together! Only have one chance to get this right and luckily I do.
"Good Morning comrades. Am I too late for breakfast? Okay how about some coffee?"


Finally get back to base after coffee and a repair and file my claim. MvR gets two (he was behind flamer) and another Kette mate, who was killed, got two also. LvR does not claim his so I may have been mistaken about who the victorious pilot was.
Out of our six member patrol two are killed and one is reported missing and still is by the time of the afternoon patrol. My claim is pending.
Posted By: OldHat

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/02/15 11:07 AM


That's cool to be in a furball with aircraft flying everywhere. I'm amazed you didn't get hit by indirect fire.

I'm thinking of making another version of a transparent label where it will be visible at around 100 meters. My reasoning is that pilots maybe could identify if the craft was friend or foe at that distance (or maybe further??)
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/02/15 12:20 PM

Much farther I beleive if I understand your question.
I am currently using no Labels but am considering trying Robert_Wiggins "Friendly only" Label mod since most everyone is in the same skin.

On that subject so I don't light up every Friendly in a 15 mile diameter I have to look at the Workshop Settings to limit Label range to something where I would realistically see a friends face, cap, jacket, or distinctive quirk on his plane.

And now that I typed that is that what you were referring to above?
If so, to average out the above things you would be looking for I would guess 100-150 meters?
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/02/15 01:03 PM

What a ghastly sight that would have been for the lower flying DH.2: the lot of the Red Baron! ...
Great shots,Duke!
Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/02/15 02:18 PM

Duke, sounds like we have awakened a modding beast in OldHat. Btw, great shots and if you want your DIH mod made into a JSGME compliant mod just send me the files.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/02/15 02:39 PM

Thank you for the offer sir but it is already done along with your beautiful skins.
Stay tuned because 56 Squadron DIH will be along shortly to dazzle all with incredible feats of aerial skill and bravery!
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/02/15 03:25 PM

Oh yea thanks for reminding me SOG. And the more "mod monsters" we have the better IMHO.

If you need a tester for your "Friendly Only - 100 meters or less" mod OldHat I'll be your huckleberry.
If I read your intentions above correctly.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/02/15 03:26 PM

Originally Posted By: Olham
What a ghastly sight that would have been for the lower flying DH.2: the lot of the Red Baron! ...
Great shots,Duke!


Thanks Olham. High praise coming from the club president.
BTW - how is the Jasta 5 fix working out?
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/02/15 05:27 PM

yep

Great pics, and good story telling. Well Done
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/03/15 11:03 AM

Saturday, April 7th, 1917. Using SOGGriffins "No HA" mod.
On 56 Squadrons first patrol in France I am assigned to lead three others as the leader of B Flight on a DOP at 1330. The weather is nice but the clouds can sometimes be a little heavy.
Enroute to the front. I like my guy's "bullet proof" mustache as it looks like the one I really have.
Sorry SOG. In this first flight I forgot to enable your DIH skin! Probably need a victory first so I really deserve it. Luckily the Huns will soon oblige.


Nearing the front I observed two specks. At first they look like they are going to close with us and, as they near, I see they are V-strutters! It was hard to really tell but it seemed, once they saw we were 4 they tried to turn away. Well well these aren't DH2's Mr. Hun and, as we close the gap, and I order the attack.
Just out of firing range my target turns to engage. This was actually a tough fight and my opponent was quite skilled. It became a series of about 5 or 7 offset head-on passes and I managed several 1 or 2 second bursts scoring some hits. Damaged and losing his nerve he tries to run.


I turn behind him and cut my throttle and let him have a full dose of Vickers and Lewis. He begins to smoke and, a couple of seconds later taking more of my .303 pounding, he blows up shedding pieces everywhere. I dive and jink a bit to avoid his trash.


I guess he is not going to manage a good landing this time. He goes down about 1 1/2 miles behind the Hun wire. S!


I circle a bit seeing no other planes in the sky. After a few more lazy circles, gaining height, I see two specks and then another and tense because I do not know who they are. After another minute, circling to try and stay behind them, I recognize the shapes of Se's and it is B Flight. They join up and I lead us back to base.
I put in my claim for one and my wingman (Capt. Ethelston) claims another. All of B Flight returned safely but A Flight loses Lt. Hainsworth crashed and killed apparently after an engine problem as they never fired a shot. Claim is pending...as is the DIH skin!
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/03/15 06:20 PM

Loki Duselldorf
Jasta 5


7 Nov 1916.



In the operations tent we were told Hq Army badly needs information as to enemy locations on the front lines. The Jasta will put up 10 machines as escort to 5 Aviatik C type a/c. With such a large formation , no one would bother us. Over the target, we spotted e/a to the west of us but no one bothered us. RTB.


image hosting 5mb


gif hosting
Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/03/15 07:40 PM

Here we have the last photo of Oberleutnant Reinhold von Schneidewind as he is heading out on his last mission. He ran into a flight of Nieuport 23s and failed to return to base.




Here we see his younger brother Leutnant Theodor von Schneidewind leaving on his first mission in his attempt to gain some revenge and solace for the loss of his dear older brother. Only time will tell if Ernst will follow in his brother's footsteps.


Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/04/15 05:24 PM

popcorn

Great pics.

Just getting ready for the SE 5 / Fokker D-7 Event.


image upload with preview
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/05/15 11:17 AM

Friday April 6, 1917 on a dawn patrol with J11. Assigned to drive away enemy artillery machines at the front. First flight with new GTX 970.
Arrive there and see distant AA bursts but nothing close and no engagements.


Flying back to base and we are about 5 miles away when more AA erupts to our left. 5 specks are closing with us and our Kette leader turns to engage. Closer I see they are Sop 1 1/2 Strutters. Tough opponents.
I single one out but two or three others are sniffing around my rear. Having just read Dicta Olham I break contact, leave the fight and come back in finding my original target. I am also flying quite "tactical" for a change and avoiding the observers fields of fire. Come up under his tail and let him have it.
Can't miss.


Good shooting for me and bad luck for him.


After watching him crash I see another far to my rear I guess trying to catch up. I oblige him and close up. In a turn fight, with about 3 firing passes, again avoiding the observer, I bring him down out of control about two miles inside friendly lines and he crashes in a plume of dust.


Avoiding much air activity, based on all the AA fire, I get (or maybe sneak is a better word) back to my base and land.
Of the 5 flight members 1 is reported missing (Brandt) but the rest land - two with damage including me. I file claims for the two Strutters (will be victories #2 and #3 if confirmed) and another Kette mate (named Kurt Hammer appropriately enough!) also files a claim for one. Kette Eins does not have combat.
The war continues.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/05/15 02:00 PM

Holy cow! If I had been where you were in that second picture behind a strutter, I'd have been shredded or dead! Salut, sir! salute
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/05/15 02:18 PM

Thanks Rick!
The picture is kind of deceptive as it was after my firing pass under his tail was over. He dove a little and to the right and I pulled up and away to the left to minimize exposure. That, and the little delay in getting to the Pause button, makes it look worse - frozen in time - then it really was. A second or two later he lit up.
Gotta give the observer credit though; when I pulled along side for the flamer screenshot he still had some fight in him and fired about 5 rounds before I decided I might be too close!
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/05/15 07:39 PM

Originally Posted By: DukeIronHand
Thanks Rick!
The picture is kind of deceptive as it was after my firing pass under his tail was over. He dove a little and to the right and I pulled up and away to the left to minimize exposure. That, and the little delay in getting to the Pause button, makes it look worse - frozen in time - then it really was. A second or two later he lit up.
Gotta give the observer credit though; when I pulled along side for the flamer screenshot he still had some fight in him and fired about 5 rounds before I decided I might be too close!


I've been hit by a flaming frying rear gunner, both plane and or pilot. Be careful!
Posted By: OldHat

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/05/15 08:22 PM

Nice to read these good reports guys. thumbsup

25 Sqn RFC, April 1916, photo recon.

One of about a dozen trench photos taken.




After finishing the shoot, Phil spots something barely visible in the clouds and aims his upper wing gun ready for an ambush







A turn fight begins.... Phil scores the hit.... and it's all over.




Back at Lozinghem in time for lunch

Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/05/15 08:40 PM

Phil is starting to warm up nicely, looks like he is finally ready to get in the game.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/05/15 08:42 PM

Looks like Phil is getting to be a regular Daniel Boone with that Lewis.
Did some QC testing some things out (more on that maybe later) and got plenty of opportunity to watch the observer animations for a long while in multiple combats.
Pretty amazing job by OBD as they actually turn, crouch, etc trying to get a bead on the enemy.
Posted By: OldHat

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/05/15 09:06 PM

Yeah, I'm startin' to get the hang of this two-seater business...
Posted By: MFair

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/07/15 01:34 AM

Shot of my SE pilot chasing a DRI with my new system. Love it



And Landing back at base.


Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/07/15 03:18 AM

popcorn

Super pics
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/07/15 11:42 AM

Originally Posted By: OldHat
Yeah, I'm startin' to get the hang of this two-seater business...


Fly in the right spot and you'll easily drop scores of Fokkers in that Fee
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/07/15 11:44 AM

MFair, did you get a new computer? Do tell more....
Posted By: MFair

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/07/15 01:09 PM

Mudwasp,yes I did. My other machine would not run the enhanced shaders no matter what I did, and I did plenty! Would still get random crashes. I talked to a company, Jetline Systems, which builds flight sim computers. Made a deal with them and then sold my old machine to my brother. Came out pretty even.

The one thing I liked about Jetline is that they build the computer, install all the software, and test fly it until it is right. Once it arrived at my house, I plugged it in, programmed my stick buttons and off I went! I am a computer idiot so this was right down my alley!

Jetline Hellfire GT2
ASRock Z97 Professional
Intel Core i7 470k Quad Core CPU 4.6GHz O/C
16GB Trident X DDR3 SDRAM 2133MHz
500GB Samsung 840 EVO Solid State Drive
4GB Nvidia GForce GTX 980
650 Watt Corsair RM Power Supply
50" HD TV for monitor

If all that tells you anything, you know more than me. All I know is that it works. If I would have spent the time doing what I know how to do that I spent trying to get my old machine to work, I could have bought 10 of them. But I did learn a bit so what the hey.
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/07/15 01:16 PM

That is sweet, what kind of cooling did they go with...fans, radiator...?

I built this one back in the late winter/early spring of 2013. Spent much time researching and shopping the parts. I was worried it might explode...but all went well.

I goggled it, very nice, even found youtubes.
Posted By: MFair

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/07/15 01:39 PM

Originally Posted By: MudWasp
That is sweet, what kind of cooling did they go with...fans, radiator...?

I built this one back in the late winter/early spring of 2013. Spent much time researching and shopping the parts. I was worried it might explode...but all went well.

I goggled it, very nice, even found youtubes.


Corsair Hydro Series H80i Liquid Cooling. That tells my dumbass its radiator.
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/07/15 04:09 PM

yep, me too biggrin
Posted By: OldHat

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/08/15 06:50 PM

It seems more appropriate that I carry over my new career pilot that starts out with 30 training hours to this thread.

Crossing the channel was not hard... it was nearly impossible!!!

Disclaimer: the pictures are dark and unclear... exactly what I was seeing while flying.

I decided to start from Dover at 6am (28 March 1917), so cranked up QC and here is what I got....



I forgot to take the screenshot while I was parked because I was confused in deciding if I should continue or restart...

Crossing the channel in these conditions with only a compass, you can imagine my relief when I finally spotted a glimpse of land.... don't tell me you can't see it, too!




Terra Nova, Hurrah!





Flew around a few times to make certain that I was actually looking at a base... and of course to spot the fences.





How do you spell relief... F U R N E S! Finally, home sweet home.

Posted By: lederhosen

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/09/15 09:30 AM

Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/09/15 02:03 PM

Lederhosen, where did you get that journal and how do you type entries into the journal?
Posted By: lederhosen

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/09/15 03:32 PM

I found that one way long ago. I used the paint thingy that comes with windows (I think). If you want a blank let me know.
Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/09/15 03:59 PM

Yes, please. That would be a wonderful way of keeping a journal.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/09/15 04:08 PM

That was a heck of a flight OldHat!
Nice work getting down in one piece.
Posted By: OldHat

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/09/15 08:15 PM

Thanks Duke.

I've setup my missions to almost play out like it is recorded in the book A history of No 10 Squadron RNAS in WW1 by Mike Westrop. So, April - Mid May 1917 seemed to be mostly short-long training flights (11 - 45 minutes) and some Coastal Defense Patrols as far east as Zeebrugge. There were only very few escort missions mostly to bomb railyards and a couple of enemy aerodrome raids. There should not be that much going on, so, I'm hoping it stays quiet and the 5 weeks pass by quick until the squadron transfers.
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/09/15 10:18 PM

Lederhosen;

Very enjoyable read Sir. Many thanks!

OldHat, get some night goggles!! Geez what a mission!
Posted By: OldHat

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/10/15 11:19 PM

Well, my first dogfight after 40 hours...




I did manage to make his engine stop....so, I let him go.




While looking for my mates, I get ambushed by two other EA. I managed to escape and land near a town on our side, but got overspeed damage in the process.

Posted By: MFair

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/10/15 11:42 PM

Welcome to the front Old Hat!
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/11/15 10:26 AM

Bit slow lately WOFF-wise because of real life and fine tuning the new video card. Think I got my settings where I want them.

Saturday, April 7, 1917. On patrol. Despite the poor weather we made contact with the enemy as the British ramp up for the Arras Offensive. Was on the tail of one but MvR jumped in front of me and finished it off. Oh well. No action shots as I was waiting for a action shot that never came.



Sunday, April 8, 1917. Morning patrol in Jasta strength. Because of the nice weather the British and French are quite active on the first day of their offensive. AA bursts are everywhere. We are circling near the front when the Kette leader turns toward the closest group of AA that is soon revealed to be 7 N23's. Their 7 versus our 5. That would be fine except as we maneuver for contact another group of 6 enemy single seaters (unknown type) come out from behind a cloud and are escorted to the party by AA fire and they also charge us. And there are still other enemy groups in the area. Where the heck is Kette 1?
In real life vs N23's (plus the other 6 coming in) I probably would have called it a day under the "discretion is the better part of valor" doctrine but can't leave my comrades hanging. By some "clever maneuvering", i.e., trying not to put myself in a stupid position, I get on the tail of a French N23, score some hits and constantly looking over my shoulder, try to finish him off. Lothar (in the upper right) dives on my target and another N23 gets on his tail. As I try to save LvR both N23's collide and go down.


Sorry this is the only shot of this massive (and one sided!) combat as I was much too busy trying not to be killed. I finally got on the tail of a N23 and, even though my shooting was absolutely horrible (my kingdom for Se5-type gun sites for my Alb) I finally bring him down north of the Lens east of the north road. Getting back to my airfield was another adventure as I dodged three additional groups of enemy aircraft (per the AA fire) to get back. Whew.
Unfortunately the Kette is destroyed with two non-HA's being shot down and killed (including my guy Kurt Hammer) and both Richthofen boys also being shot down, aircraft destroyed, but walking away with just wounds. Kette 1 misses combat much to my amazement. I could have walked back to my field on all the Entente aircraft flying about it seems.
File my claim for one N23 and it will be victory #6 if confirmed.
Posted By: OldHat

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/11/15 01:37 PM

Those furballs seem like they only last a few secs, heh. I hate being ambushed, but it's such an adrenaline rush for survival when it happens....

If you're interested or want to kill off the Richthofen boys from your squad, there's a simple way to do it.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/11/15 02:13 PM

Hehe. Yes I know however this is a special "Aces DIH" mod with the Richthofen boys specifically added back in as the ONLY J11 aces.
Felt kind of funny without them.

And yes indeed I was quite surprised to get out of that one alive. The old DIH would have been dead but I have become more "circumspect" in my old age.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/15/15 07:02 PM

Saturday April 7, 1917. First patrol in France with a new 56 Squadron career with British HA enabled (its complicated).
0815 take-off for a DOP with B Flight - Captain Ball leading,into the grey, cloudy skies. No sun today.
Flying over the front. Either my new card or video settings are cool as the smoke used to flicker. Two days prior to the start of the Arras Offensive British artillery tunes up for the upcoming fracas.


About 6 miles behinds the lines Capt. Ball shallow dives in a gentle turn. I dont see them at first but they are Huns - 4 of them - either landing or taking off from a field I guess as there is one close by. As I am in my gentle turn and dive I hear this horrible noise. At first I think I am diving too fast or steep but no way. Look behind me and Maxwell (HA) has takeen a direct hit from AA fire and plummets down, minus his wings, on fire. First time I have seen a flight mate hit by AA. Guess I'll be a little nervous in the next barrage.

The Huns however don't care and continue their attack. I get behind this one and shoot him up till he goes out of control and crashes in a plume of dust near a treeline.


See another that Capt. Ball is trying to get a grip on and intercede and shoot him down in flames. He crashes about a half mile from the Hun Field.


Back at base B Flight files 4 claims two being mine. All return and land safely except for unlucky Maxwell.
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/15/15 08:33 PM

Nice screenies and report Duke! Thanks.
Posted By: OldHat

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/15/15 08:50 PM

Originally Posted By: Robert_Wiggins
Nice screenies and report Duke! Thanks.


+1 thumbsup
Posted By: OldHat

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/17/15 05:12 PM


Busy at Auchel aerodrome




Al and Phil's first encounter with a two-seater



Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/17/15 06:21 PM

Old Phil is getting to be a real slayer!
Posted By: OldHat

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/17/15 08:15 PM

Yeah, wonder how much longer they can hold out until newer EA start appearing.

Mental Note - don't taxi and steer over bomb holes.... or you'll get your tail chewed up.




Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/17/15 08:27 PM

Interesting screenshots and details!
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/19/15 08:27 PM

After arriving in France with 56 we have been flying one mission a day. Since starting "High in the Empty Blue" I now know why. Nice work OBD...again.
Typical weather in the first half of April. We have had two good flying days since our arrival. Scored two kills on our first day (previous post)in France, also the last nice weather day.
Typical weather.


Did manage 1 confirmed kill on the 10th and had this unconfirmed kill on the 12th. In WOFF's defense he did manage a good landing despite my attempts to kill him some more.


Got some shots at this one but a flight mate managed more and claimed the kill.

Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/19/15 08:46 PM

Saturday, April 14 1917. Our second nice weather day in "sunny" France.
56 is assigned to a Line Patrol west of Lens in squadron strength. 5 man B Flight is followed by 5 strong A Flight but just prior to crossing the lines our Flight Leader drops out with engine trouble.


About 2 miles into Hunland I spot this group of 4 V-Strutters and turn toward them and they accept the challenge! Thought it awfully brave of 4 Huns to stand up to 9 Se's but apparently they know A Flight better than I because the 5 man A Flight does not engage. So its a even fight. I'll have some words for Captain Ball when I get back. If I get back!


Heard a clunk and did a quick instrument check. Threw this shot in here as I like the shiny Se cockpit.


After some initial turns and maneuvering I manage to get on this Hun's tail and let him have it with both Vickers and Lewis. Victory #4! Unfortunately as I look back to clear my tail (being surprised by how close the Alb trash came) I see a Se going down trailing a thin black smoke and no wings.


I can't help my flight mate but I can avenge his death and turn toward this Hun and after two passes he goes down out of control to make a smoking hole in the wire in No Mans Land. Victory #5!


Back at base B Flight claims 3 Albs with two being mine. All return safely except Captain Chittford who obviously was the wingless Se. RIP and you did not die alone brave sir.
A Flight, of course, did not engage but managed to lose a man anyway who is still posted missing by afternoon tea. Time to break out the BJM Ace skin.
Posted By: OldHat

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/23/15 04:03 PM

It's a blast when you can replay a squad's history through WOFF.... I enjoy it, too!

My first Gotha mission to bomb Paris factories and I get damaged by AA. Next time I'll take missions that cross the channel... me thinks it's probably safer.



Posted By: lecrop

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/24/15 11:30 AM

Amazing OldHat, how many hours to complete the Paris bombing mission?
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/24/15 01:49 PM

It took me over 5 hours to run a mission like that, bombing Paris in a Gotha. We stayed in German territory as long as possible entering France near Soissons.
Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/24/15 03:08 PM

Wow, was that 5 hours of real time? salute
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/24/15 04:44 PM

Saturday April 21, 1917. Dawn patrol with B Flight on a DOP to the Hun airfield at Haubourdon. After 4 days of poor weather and mission cancellations the sun is finally out.
Now that I am an Ace I took advantage of the bad weather and had my ground crew paint up my trusty SE. Skin courtesy of Banjoman with slight modifications by Cpl. Jones - one of my fitters.


About 6 miles over we come across these three Huns. At first they appeared to want to fight then changed their mind and tried to disengage. Unfortunately for them that change of heart came much too late as the SE was much too speedy for their old crates.


Pick out their tail end Hans and I hole his tank and he goes down out of control to crash.


Circle around to gain height and to try to form back up with my flight when I close on one that is soon revealed to be another Alb. Making a beautiful deflection shot I again hole his petrol tank and, leaking oil and gas, he goes down for a crash.


Apparently they were pals as he goes down near my first victory.


Circling for height again and trying to find B Flight I see a balloon at my level and close by. I feel that I may be pressing my luck but, so far, my new paint job has been lucky and I make for it and shot it down in a flaming fashion.


Feeling that my luck may be done for the day I finally form up with Lt. Cudley and Rhys-Davids and make for home. Unsure of where the other two are.
Back at base I file for my 3 claims and Cudley files for one. My wingman (Lt. Sheldon) is at first reported missing but turns up in the afternoon minus his Se which was damaged in some type of forced landing - probably engine trouble.
Of my three claims the first Alb is rejected but the second one, and the balloon, are confirmed making it 8 confirmed kills so far for Lt. "DIH". The war continues on.
Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/24/15 06:14 PM

Hey now, I didn't give you permission to go messin' with that skin I made. Oh shucks, I forgot to have you sign the "No messin' with the skin document".
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/24/15 06:36 PM

Originally Posted By: Banjoman
Wow, was that 5 hours of real time? salute


Yes, day it was released. I took 3 short breaks, was leader and chose my own route, had to use the in game map a few times.... Never had an escort on a Gotha mission. Pilots don't last long because we eventually get swarmed by enemy scouts. I'm not very good at it, but manning gunner positions is hectic fun when under attack. Good fun bombing too, heck of a bomb load!
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/24/15 06:53 PM

Originally Posted By: Banjoman
Hey now, I didn't give you permission to go messin' with that skin I made. Oh shucks, I forgot to have you sign the "No messin' with the skin document".


Hehe...I tried to tell Cpl. Jones that but he just kept muttering about "Damn Yanks" and kept painting.
Posted By: OldHat

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/24/15 08:11 PM

Originally Posted By: lecrop
Amazing OldHat, how many hours to complete the Paris bombing mission?


Unfortunately, I got hit by AA and couldn't complete the mission. It took one hour to reach Arras and then glide towards NML.

Posted By: OldHat

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/24/15 08:18 PM

Duke, I see that you stop shooting when they're smoking, which makes perfect sense.... I usually keep shooting and try to get a flamer, but I can't seem to be consistent in landing my shots at the engine. sigh
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/24/15 09:43 PM

Yea I get lucky sometimes.
There is a certain angle (about 35 degrees) where I have the bullet trajectory, lead, and drop figured perfectly.
The problem is that Mr. Hun does not always cooperate with my plans to obtain said angle!
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/25/15 10:25 AM

Sunday 22 April 1917. Dawn patrol with 56 with me as the leader for the first (actual) time. Previous Leader assignment was a rain out.
Quite murky under the clouds, and with the rising sun, but above the clouds we see the sun and, over the lines, a group of 4 or 5 Hun V-Strutters escorting some two-seaters a bit lower down. Knowing better then to focus on the two-seaters I try to lead my flight to a good position before ordering the attack on the Alb's but I misjudge our angles and get too close to the enemy and they react. So instead of a great position we are just in a "OK one" and I order the attack.
This mission was a good lesson for me and taught me to be more careful with the Alb's. Probably save my life later as the lesson in caution was well learned.
I pick out one and get a few hits but see tracers from my rear as one gets on my tail. Give a slight evasive move and try to get back on my target but the Hun does not give up and even scores a few hits! Do a better evasive move (a modified Split-S) and, when done, I see he is still on my tail! Now worried I go all out to shake him and cut my throttle and head almost straight down to a cloud. Dive thru it for a few seconds in zero visibility, pull out, put on the gas, and emerge from the cloud in a off-set rear position on my pursuer. Lucky! I close and he tries to turn but my shooting is good and he goes down. Victory #9 in the dim light and murk under the clouds.


While I watch him crash tracers light up all around me. I clear my tail but see nothing then realize I am over the German trenches. They may not show well in this pic but on the lower right the Hun gunners are trying to avenge their loss with a firework display of tracers. They shoot well and I take a couple of hits.


Turn for home and, after several moments, realize my engine is not producing full power and checking my instruments, realize I have a coolant leak. Lucky I am not 5 miles in Hunland but in friendly territory and just manage to crawl to the nearest emergency field, land, and hit a tent hanger but lucky I was going so slow it just brings me to a full stop. Whew. No losses for B Flight and several Huns are claimed. A lot of luck here!
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/25/15 10:58 AM

Monday 23 April 1917. Now that some of the bugs have been worked out of the Se5 (and there were plenty per my latest book) the squadron now goes to "High" mission frequency per the Ready Room which should mean two missions a day.
The first is another Line Patrol at dawn but without all the clouds the visibility is much better. Near the front I see several individual aircraft straggling back to British territory. Apparently things are hot already.


Just over into Hunland a group of 5 Albs wish to contest this violation of their airspace. The Flight Leader orders the attack and I just miss being rammed by a flight mate as the AI does their usual (and visually nonsensical) "blow up and scatter around" thing they do when ordered to attack from a bad (to the AI mind) position - I think.


My AI pals are getting their stuff together in their pre-attack dance and I pick out a Hun who tries to turn. In a great deflection shot I give him a short burst and he noses over and goes down. Thinking that he is "faking" (which I have seen - actually I think they sustain damage, stall or lose control, then recover several thousand feet down but we'll call it "faking") I follow but nope, looks like he is really going down. Using the newly discovered "J" key I clicked around and find my boy.


Based on the bullet holes near the cockpit it looks like a pilot kill. Lucky shooting! Victory #10!


Circling to form up I am soon joined by two Se's and then see a single speck low and flying east. Almost certainly a Hun! Having plenty of ammo left I dive and am followed by the two Se's. I cut my throttle and get in a pretty good burst but have to break off and my two flight mates also take their shots. I circle for another pass but my buddies are on him like white on rice, so much so I think they may hit the ground but they don't and the Hun makes a forced landing. A shared victory for the flight I suppose.


Back at base claims are made for 4 Huns, 1 being mine, but we lose the two non-HA flight members listed a "Destroyed by Enemy Action" one of which was the Captain Flight Leader. Not to dance on the grave of a comrade but with 10 kills my Captain pip may be coming soon. The war continues.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/25/15 07:45 PM

2nd mission of the day. A DOP at high noon about 15 miles behind the lines south of Douai smack in the middle of 6 Hun airfields. Captain Ball is leading Crowe and myself. A Flight in support.


Fairly uneventful trip and we arrive in the middle of all the airfields and a group of Huns approaches from a higher altitude. Captain Ball being Captain Ball he orders the attack.
I manage to get me and Hans here all alone and its a fight to the death!


My shooting, which has been great the past several missions, fails me now and it takes about 6 passes to really bring him down out of control and he crashes near a road to a airfield. As an excuse for my poor shooting I will use the distraction of the ground fire from 6 Hun airfields in a 3 mile radius. As he smacks in a plume of dust and smoke I am hit by MG's from the nearby field. I quickly turn and try to thread the needle between these bases to make a get-away. On the 15 mile trip back to friendly lines I am staring at my instruments. Hey! Am I running hot? Nope - just paranoid. Whew.

Back at base all three members of B Flight make it back (the 4th never crossed the lines dropping out with engine trouble) and Crowe and I file claims.
Not only is this victory confirmed but two others that were pending making it 11 total. With a slap on the back and handshake the CO tells me I am being promoted to Captain. As flight leader I must try to take care of my people. It's going to be a long war I am afraid.

EDIT: Just noticed MY aircraft shadow on his plane - cool.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/26/15 10:39 AM

Just like to thank SimHQ for providing me with a dedicated DIH thread to post my thrilling adventures. Doesn't anyone else get up at 0400 on the weekends to get some flight time in?

Tuesday 24 April 1917. Newly minted Captain DIH leads his flight on the morning Line Patrol. Over the front lines I observe a group of about 6 or 7 specks heading toward another group of 6 specks. I get all excited and plan on joining this massive upcoming furball. I must have been daydreaming about glory before I realized they were all Huns. I attempted to steer my flight away to gain a better position, and thought I did, when tracers fly by my head from behind. Yikes! Didn't realize I was so close! At least two Alb's are on my tail. Do a modified Split-S to evade and give the order to attack.
It's a aerial madhouse and I don't even think of sticking to a target but fire short bursts as Huns cross my nose. I get a nice snap shot at a Hun head-on and he puffs smoke and rolls away but there are plenty more. Swarming around like bees the whole mess gradually descends to lower heights when I suddenly find myself all alone. Look around for my flight and see three specks with Hun AA bursting around them. As I watch one of the specks drops like a stone with another after it. Hope the good guys are winning there.
Peeping over the side of my cockpit I see a Hun flying the same direction as I at about 500'. I dive on him like a hawk.
One pass one kill!


Resuming course toward the now sporadic AA fire I now realize that there are a lot of aircraft around - and all are Huns that I can see. Make for one and, in a check on my tail, I see this guy trying to line up on me. In a turn fight that went from 500' to about 20' I start to quake when I am suddenly on his tail.
A 3 second burst and its all over. Huzzah!


Fly back on my own as no friendly aircraft are in sight. I start wondering how the Brits will treat a American flight commander that loses his whole flight?
Back at base I find, much to my surprise, that all are safe and that madman Maxwell is claiming 3. I put in my claims for 2. A Flight, without firing a shot, loses 2 of our boys.
Lead the afternoon patrol in the hazy sunshine (PR Weather Mod Lite) but see nothing except a smoking British two-seater struggling to regain friendly territory.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/01/15 09:38 AM

Friday April 26 1917. Leading B Flight myself and one other (Captain Larry Howell) take-off at 0630 to attack a high value balloon target that we burned the previous day. Apparently the devious Huns have moved up another yesterday afternoon in a attempt to maintain their flow of information. Cecil Lewis is assigned as support.
The approach to the balloon is, besides the AA, without incident but near the target the air is filthy with other aircraft specks buzzing around. I assign Howell to attack the balloon which he does while I fly cover. Looking over the side I see he is successful and fire a flare to form up and circle and wait while watching all the other aircraft in the area. After a few minutes I do not see him and start for friendly lines thinking he went on ahead. After several minutes I see a speck behind me trying to catch up. Assuming it's Howell I circle back to allow him to form up but the shape looks funny and I have to look twice to realize its a V-Strutter! I get in two good bursts and hole his tank and he tries to get away now but there is no outrunning an Se. I close up on his rear and finish him off.
Thought I had more pics but I guess I was hitting the wrong key.


Back at base Howell is missing and listed as "Destroyed by enemy action" and killed. Downed by AA fire? Lewis returns ok.
I put in a claim for victory #15 and, because Howell was killed we may have to go after the balloon again. The Debrief wasn't entirely clear.
Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/01/15 02:07 PM

Duke, a lot of us are currently engaged in either Rick's challenge or Olham's DID campaign and that is why you seem to be the only one posting. In a week when Rick's challenge is over, I'm sure there will be more posters. By the way, very nice reports and now I'm sure the reason for your continuing success is because of that beautiful skin you're using. biggrin
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/01/15 02:26 PM

Oh I have no doubt the mighty skin is the main factor in my continued success.
As for the rest of you guys I kind of like having my own personal thread - makes me feel like a big deal!
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/03/15 09:57 AM

April 26 1917 and the 3rd run on the same balloon as in run #2 the pilot who shot it down was himself shot down so no claim/confirmation apparently.
Full strength squadron effort this time. Me leading 5 members of B Flight with 4 members of A Flight in support. Except for AA not much happens.


Near the target I order a flight attack on the balloon, while I fly cover, and it quickly lights up. Swing off target and fire a flare to form up so I don't lose the actual pilot who shot down the balloon (in hindsight being all HA this was probably not a concern - I think) and I set off for nearby British territory. Just over the lines the distant flight, which was following, now starts to thrash around. I try the Rejoin command again and circle when I am shot at. I am actually surprised by an attack of an Alb DII. Guess this is why the flight was acting all funny.


Quickly turning I shot him up and he rolls on his back and goes straight down and crashes on a road.


Committing the classic "Fighter Pilot Error #4" as I watch my foe go down I am surprised AGAIN and shot up! WTH are all these Albs coming from? This guys shooting is much better and he hits my engine which now sounds like a washing machine spinning a tool box. Normally I would make a run for it but I am over friendly territory and, while I still have power, turn into him and in two passes he goes down - apparently shot at also by Crowe.
Took a screenshot but actually hit the key when I was looking down at my keyboard - oops. Guess I was all excited.
Back at base everyone returns safe and the balloon is claimed. Ominously I see another flight mate also puts in a claim for a aircraft but I claim the 2 anyway.
Well both are rejected (as Crowe actually shot down one of my claims apparently) but at least HQ finally decides we are done with the balloon.
And a valuable lesson is (re-)learned at the cost of a new engine. Cheap!
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/03/15 01:43 PM

"This guys shooting is much better and he hits my engine which now sounds like a washing machine spinning a tool box."

Great description of that dreaded sound

thumbsup
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/04/15 01:38 AM

Well, now that I am good and dead in my own challenge, I guess I can come over here and give Duke some company, poor though it will be. I figured I'd jump back into my Rother Nought Naval career that I haven't touched in about two months. Boy am I out of shape on the Pup! Used to the heavy, powerful SE5a, I spent the fist few critical turns oversteering on everything. We dove on some Rolands and, well, that's NEVER a good idea! The guy hit me with two bursts. The first one crippled my roll rate and the second severed my fuel line (From now on, any time you hear the words "two seater" from me, if you think "severed fuel lines" you'll save me a lot of typing).

The funny part is, in the video, you can see the point where the low fuel level warning comes up and I am just So. Done. With. It. Going to land, I look around and see waaaay too many fences. Fortunately, the Pup can glide forever and I get her down in one piece. Oh, and my wingmen never fired a shot! Go Brits!!!

This video explains things much better than I could...


Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/04/15 01:55 AM

Great video and really nice landing. My two favorite planes in WOFF are the Pup followed by the Sopwith Triplane. If given a choice I would probably fly those planes over any other planes in the sim.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/04/15 02:18 AM

15 kills!
Looks like we are neck and neck for a "Reports from the Front" thread competition.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/04/15 02:41 AM

Thanks, Banjoman, I forgot about my damaged roll rate to the left and almost lost it on that final turn. But, when you get shot down every single time you go up against two seaters, you get pretty good at landing in fields. rofl

Duke, as you can see, my mission:kill ratio isn't that high, I think you got this one! salute
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/04/15 08:30 AM

15 claims and 15 victories? Looks like you are doing something right.
I am like 15 victories for 23 claims and that's padding my % chance where I think appropriate.

Guess we'll go with total mission count + survival = bragging rights.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/04/15 01:03 PM

I had claims set to "Easier" because I kept forgetting to click on the "Claim Report" button on the debrief screen and was missing a lot of claims. I switched back to normal for the challenge so that confirmation percentage should be dropping soon. thumbsup
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/04/15 08:44 PM

Monday, April 9 1917. Flying with J11 on a cloudy morning about 45 minutes after sunrise with my 8 victory ace Leutnant DIH. Getting frantic calls from the front as the British start their Arras offensive. Led by MvR we head west for the action.


Unfortunately the French and British were apparently airborne before us and we do not get near the front when we are attacked by a unknown number (I was admiring the sun and clouds) of French Neiuports. They suffer badly in the upcoming fight but do their job as a 8 unknown plane formation passes 1000' over our heads heading east unmolested - obviously British or French bombers.
I find this gentlemen who seems hot to shoot down one on my comrades so I get on his tail several times in a long lasting (because of my poor shooting) circle fight that drops to low levels. On his tail again he tries to evade, I turn after him, and lose sight. The reason? The big cloud of dust and smoke. Think he flew into the ground trying to get away from me.


While circling I see another plane, not too far off at my level. Another N23! He was flying toward me, I think, but changes his mind and tries to get away. MvR and Schaeffer fly over my head but do not assist. Perhaps the 3 v 1 is not to his liking. My shooting, however, is absolutely terrible combined with a jerky Track IR from ambient light. Finally get some good shots into him and he levels out allowing me to close and finish him off. He goes straight down and crashes in a field.


With no one in sight, and low on ammo, I set out for my home airfield. All the Jasta returns safely and claims are made for two by other Kette members. I put in a claim for my two and they are pending.
They will be victory #9 and #10 if confirmed.

EDIT: Apparently I was wrong. My J11 guy was actually a 6 victory ace and this is victory 7 and 8. They have been confirmed along with #9 that I just got.
I was breathing easy - 10 seems to be a jinx number in my Alb careers.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/05/15 08:25 PM

Collection of shots from combat flights on April 9 and 10. With the British offensive at its height I have been very busy to record much and so darn lucky that I have achieved 4 kills though, of course with unlucky #10 I was wounded but I got the N17 that wounded me so we are even. Needed a little 9 day vacation anyway to show my new medal to the folks back home.
According to forum ace BJM this plane probably belongs to one of the RNAS squadrons. Least it wasn't a Triplane.

Being chased by 3 Nieuports.

One of the rare times we have an advantage in altitude.

This is the guy that wounded me but he ended up paying a steep price. When I am trying to shoot down your friend don't come up and shoot me in the back eh?

Spad VII looked pretty smooth coming in but NML is rough and he flipped.


Of course coming back from my 9 days off I see all the Jasta Leaders pets have been equipped with the new Alb DIII while me and the other non-HA's still have the early model.
I'll get one!

Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/06/15 05:20 AM

Woah, something new today, a Roland severed my fuel lines... I KNOW, RIGHT??? So, here's the file:



I feel like Orr in Catch 22 has a better success rate than me lately! Of course, my landing was not as smooth as last time due to some faster than expected descent and some late pop-in telephone lines... I feel like I used up a bunch of Karma on that one... or maybe the sim was like, "This guy's been pretty good to us, let's cut him some slack".

Anyway, got credit:



Still working on a "Duke" worthy fight!

salute
Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/06/15 01:10 PM

Whoa Rick, I think you should just leave two seaters alone, they don't seem to be agreeable with you. biggrin
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/06/15 01:29 PM

They definitely tend to stick in the craw a bit...
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/08/15 10:53 PM

Alrighty Rick. Time to show your cards.
Got a pre-dawn campaign flight in earlier today. A balloon busting mission with me leading one other member of 56 Squadron.
After blowing it up (and in the campaign briefing getting the "...good job on getting the balloon yet further in the Debrief saying we failed to get it) I flew "56 style" and helped escort a group of Be's (themselves being escorted by Nieuports) on a recon mission.
Despite the good weather not a single Hun was seen.
Hoping my flight time tomorrow will be a little more exciting. I'll use tonight to mod out Bletchley's mission mod to remove the balloon missions till something is done.
And I don't feel bad doing it because 56 got no balloons IIRC in 5 months at the front per "High in the Empty Blue".
Posted By: MFair

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/08/15 11:41 PM

Nice flying Rick. And to quote my favorite movie, "right up to the part where you almost got killed!"
Posted By: MFair

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/08/15 11:56 PM

Nice flying Rick. And to quote my favorite movie, "right up to the part where you almost got killed!"
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/09/15 03:12 PM

Saturday April 27 1917 at 1330 leading the 3 strong B Flight on the afternoon Line Patrol with A Flight in support. The mornings balloon attack mission went well, in great weather (above) but we saw no Huns. In the clouds we quickly lose A Flight and just prior to crossing the lines HA Meinjtes drops out with engine trouble leaving just me and non-HA Lt. Channing.


Circle just behind the front for a few and see 4 specks below. As they are trying to intercept us I know they are Huns. Leading Channing I drop a bit and gain speed and, being an old hand now, make for the Hun who has separated a bit from his comrades. This is him with Channing in the upper right going after the three other Huns. 2 vs 4 but this is 56! spartasign


Going after my target I make a pass, scoring good hits, and he now thinks twice about the engagement and tries to get away but I got this Se5 stuff down and am on him. One of his friends gets on my tail but I shake him with a "corkscrew Split-S (tm)" that quickly puts me back on the tail of my target. Another good burst of Vickers and Lewis and he goes straight down for a crash.


Looking around for his pal I see him and get on his tail for a perfect shot only to find my guns are jammed! What the heck! I didn't even notice after my last victory. I keep after him all the while trying to clear my guns. Finally I do and get in another good burst and he puffs smoke and tries to flee to a nearby airfield with me hot on his tail. Over the field I am amazed by the number of tracers coming up, am hit by ground fire, and wonder if I am being stupid. I keep at him though (56!) and, with a lot of rounds, he goes down and finally hits the ground in a nice gentle curve apparently with a dead pilot at the controls. Channing nearby is my witness to his destruction.


Low on ammo I gain height for the trip back across the lines avoiding AA concentrations and finally cross with Channing and land at a friendly field.
Channing puts in a claim for one and I claim two. A Flight makes no contact.
One claim is confirmed and the other is not (oddly the one where my witness was 100' away) making it now 17 kills for Captain DIH. The CO, in a meeting in the mess, states I am to be awarded the DSO for my actions. As a "real life" aside this is my highest scoring WOFF ace ever. Drinks are on me men!
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/09/15 11:47 PM

Morning Line Patrol on April 28. a newly arrived Major Stockman is leading.
Over the front I see 6 specks with 3 more about 500' higher. The Major orders the attack. Figuring the three higher specks are fighter escorts I make for them but nope. More DFW's with bombs attached.
Pick out one and attack. I worked hard at this one to avoid the observer (who usually shoots me up) but my "tactics" pay off and I only get a couple of holes in the wing. He finally lights up and, shedding his wings, comes down in the British trenches.


Same plane. Apparently every shot I fired hit the plane just nothing vital till the very end!


Fly behind the lines and attack a Alb DII and damage him but he dives for a Hun field and, already damaged, am wary of the AA fire. Firing some bursts at longish range, and get some smoke puffs, but he lands normally.

Back at base I put in my claim and the non-HA stud, Channing, claims two.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/10/15 02:14 PM

Originally Posted By: DukeIronHand


Same plane. Apparently every shot I fired hit the plane just nothing vital till the very end!



Duke, you should tell your fellow pilots (cue Arnold voice *disregard that no one in 1917 knows who Arnold is*) "That fellow was blind, and I was trying to teach him a lesson... IN BRAILLE!!!!!!"

duck

yeah. I had that coming...

I went back to Rick Rawlings in RFC #60, still trying to see in the dark in dawn patrols. We were supposed to be attacking the rail yard near Athies...how do you suppose that went?

*sound is off a bit, not sure why that is happening lately...



oh yeah, and long after the fighting is over, on the WAY HOME, the sun decides to peep up...



Claim was rejected, must have been too early for the boys in the office to crawl out of bed to file the paperwork...
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/10/15 02:20 PM

Nice!
Speaking of 60 I just created a career starting in November 1916.
Never had a pilot in 1916 so this will be interesting. Wanted to start earlier but I had to make sure I got the N17.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/17/15 10:29 AM

Some authors, in recording the loss of a WW1 pilot, often say the most dangerous time for a pilot is when he returns from a extended leave as he needs time to get back in the "swing of things." Just got a taste of that as this was my first WOFF flight in about 9 days as I was out of town for work.

April 29 1917 on a morning Line Patrol with 56 Squadron leading B Flight.
We were still about 10 miles behind the lines when I observed British AA around a higher group of 5 specks to our right. Figuring they were two-seaters I turn the flight to intercept. As we got near the specks peeled off to attack our 4 man group and they were revealed to be Alb DII's. Quite bold to be so far back in British territory.
Anyway I never got a shot off and was pummeled by two of the Alb's as I was attacking another. Petrol tank was finally holed and I was forced to land but the flight did well shooting down 3.


I was not wounded so a cheap lesson was learned.
As a consolation prize I decided to fire up my 1916 60 Squadron career to get warmed up and got a Halb DII and a balloon on a DOP. No pics though as I was focusing of flying and fighting...this time!
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/18/15 02:17 AM

Back with Rick Rawlings and RFC #60. Mid-February, 1917. After an uneventful Friendly Territory patrol, I pulled out of the landing pattern and headed off to travel the front for a bit to see how much trouble I could stir up. Turns out, quite a bit! I encountered a flight of Rolands headed in a southewesterly direction about 1500 feet below me. Never one to learn my lesson, I dove on them fully expecting to end up in the hospital again:

For once, they only have the silver medalist marksman from the Olympics and not the gold, so I made it out relatively intact. As my flight was back at base, I filed a claim with no witness. Apparently, the nearby infantry division must have spoke well on my behalf, for it was confirmed!

My head tracking was terrible the whole time. Because of the way the video frame rate is capped, you can't see how bad it really is, twitching all over the place. Unfortunately, flying at real life dusk causes a lot of glare from the lights off my glasses, which wreaks havoc with the head tracking!
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/18/15 08:38 AM

"...glare from the light on my glasses"

I have taken to wearing spectacles ("cheater" reading glasses) while playing WOFF and I wonder if that explains the odd tracking problems I sometimes have. But a lot of people wear glasses so I thought (hoped) it was something in the enviorment.

My new TrackIR Clip Pro should be arriving today specifically for this issue. Hopefully it will solve the problem.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/18/15 01:14 PM

Good luck, I am still using FaceTrack, so having a strong glare right where it is trying to detect your eye understandably creates some mayhem! winkngrin
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/18/15 02:21 PM

Ah. Didn't realize you were not using regular TrackIR.
I'll let you know how it works out for future purchase planning.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/20/15 12:56 AM

Ok, here's a real dogfight for you, Duke! We had just turned North when patrolling the front when we saw some Albatros scouts that thought better about attacking us. Since we outnumbered them 2 to one and were 1000 feet or so above them, I ordered the attack. Soon, some Halberstadts passing by decided to jump in. One guy was so good, I had to break off from the Albatros to attack him:

I really like how my wingman cleared my six there at the beginning. He was awarded that plane too!
I put in for the Halberstadt (rejected!), I didn't see what happened to the original Albatros, even though he was smoking when last I left him. Very fun fight, overall!
Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/20/15 02:31 AM

Did you run out of ammo? I was wondering why you didn't fire on that last Albatros. Of course it was rejected, it was plain to me that you didn't shoot that plane down. winkngrin
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/20/15 04:42 AM

Originally Posted By: Banjoman
Did you run out of ammo? I was wondering why you didn't fire on that last Albatros. Of course it was rejected, it was plain to me that you didn't shoot that plane down. winkngrin


His wings "retreated", I suppose... thumbsup Yeah, ran out of Lewis drums at the end, there. Not bad for a day's work, wot?
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/20/15 12:55 PM

Hell of a time to run out of ammo! You had him all set up for the Kill!
I saw a few head on passes by the germans. Did any of them shoot at you? One pass that Halb made was rather close for comfort..
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/20/15 01:29 PM

Not in the head-on. The Halberstadt plinked me in what must have been a significant deflection shot for him.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/20/15 08:41 PM

Nice video and nice dogfight.
Looked like a real barn burner.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/21/15 04:33 AM

Thanks Duke, we need to get you Shadowplay or FRAPS or something! salute
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/21/15 06:43 AM

Funny you say that.
As I was watching your video I was kicking around the idea.
Maybe next time I do a driver update I will install the Shadowplay part.

EDIT: Oh, BTW, the TrackClip Pro works great. Much better then the hat clip.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/21/15 01:21 PM

Thanks for the tip, mate, I will hopefully be ordering next week!
Posted By: MFair

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/21/15 01:39 PM

You are cold blooded Rick!
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/21/15 05:42 PM

Thanks, MFair, I think!

After being promoted to Captain, Rick Rawlings was sent home for a much needed break, having been in constant service since August of the previous year. He returned for his first flight back on April 1, 1917. Leading B flight east on a Dawn Patrol, they encountered a group of enemy Albatros scouts at 9000 feet. Signalling the attack, Rick led #60 squad into the fight...

I love those evenly matched, straight-up fights, if it had only happened an hour later so my video would look nicer, it would have been perfect! We ended up bagging 3 enemy scouts to a loss of one of ours, with the pilot ok. In honor of carrick, I expended 156 rounds from two Lewis Drums, scoring around 30 hits!
thumbsup

MudWasp, I don't know if you were looking for evidence in the last video, but in this one I was definitely shot at twice by Germans coming at me head on. Although the planes are out of view both times, in the first you can see the tracers, and in the second you can hear the guns firing.

Also, the kill was confirmed!
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/21/15 05:52 PM

You turn fight and loop that Nupe well, Rick !
Yep, those tracers early on sure got my attention too.

thumbsup on the confirmed HA
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/23/15 03:36 PM

May 2, 1917 on a DOP at dawn with B Flight. Lead by a new Major to the squadron. He's lucky though. A lot of white clouds at flight level with bright blue overhead.

About 8 miles into Hunland he orders the attack on 4 Albs higher then us. Thought for a moment we may surprise them but this one turns into us for the attack.
As a admin note this flight was done with my GTX 970 settings maxed out in the Nvidia Control Panel and my FPS was the same as lower settings. Go figure.


I engage him in the cloud shadows and after two passes he starts to fly oddly.


Guess I see why. I watch him as he does a slow corkscrew down to his end.


Do a casual glance behind me and see his friend almost in range smack on my tail! Do a frantic Split-S with a pull up and (accidental) stall. Upon recovery it takes about three turns to get behind him as he is hot to shoot me.


With some good shooting he emits black smoke and noses over and begins to burn and break up half way down.


Back at base all the flight returns safely and I make the only claims for victories #20 and #21.
A Flight manages to lose two non-HA's but they never fired a shot.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/23/15 04:28 PM

Nicely done, Duke! Wish I could claim good shooting! I will plead: 1) Very Windy and 2) Although the video tends to smooth stuff out, my head tracking was playing with me (I can't wait to order my Track IR!) and 3) I have a request in for transfer to #56 Squadron and am super nervous about ripping a wing off before then... (It's already happened once when I re-installed WOFF and forgot to disable my twist rudder!).

Anyway, here's the latest:


My wingmen were right in the area, so no prob with confirmation:


I still need to play with the joystick a bit, the sudden movement is what produces the excess G Force. I wish WOFF had a true visual Joystick setup curve, would be much wasier to tweak everything...
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/23/15 04:53 PM

Nice Turn & Burn, Rick!
And you didn't get suckered into a diving pursuit...
What was up with the pause? Just curious...bad head tracking?

Hey, methinks you are doing well with aim. That crossing paths shot was well done!
My suggestion when on the tail like you were in the end is to shoot and bob the nose up and down while doing so to see where and how that sight comes into target in relation to bullet trajectory. That upper gun ain't like a bore sight and distance is HUGE as to where the bullets fly. Not a criticism, just a suggestion.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/23/15 05:15 PM

Or you can "cheat" like I do and fly with "Wind" set to OFF.
Hehe...
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/23/15 05:45 PM

Originally Posted By: MudWasp
Nice Turn & Burn, Rick!
And you didn't get suckered into a diving pursuit...
What was up with the pause? Just curious...bad head tracking?

Hey, methinks you are doing well with aim. That crossing paths shot was well done!
My suggestion when on the tail like you were in the end is to shoot and bob the nose up and down while doing so to see where and how that sight comes into target in relation to bullet trajectory. That upper gun ain't like a bore sight and distance is HUGE as to where the bullets fly. Not a criticism, just a suggestion.



Yeah, anytime there's a pause like that, it's alt-tabbing out to reset the head tracking. Thanks for the tips, will try to wiggle on target, if I remember in the heat of battle! thumbsup

Duke, as you will see in a few minutes, I think I have solved the wind issues for a bit! salute
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/23/15 06:01 PM

So Rick Rawlings got transferred to #56 Squadron. He waved bye-de-bye to his friends at Filescamp, and hopped a bus for Vert Galant. His mechanic spent the whole day painting his bus and after a quick evening flight to put her through the paces (he had previously flown the SE5 when he was on home leave in March), he settled in eager to get back to the fight on a dawn patrol. Leading a flight early in the morning, they encountered enemy bombers with their escorts over the lines at 10000 feet.


This is only the second time I have survived to make it to the SE5. Much more stable than the N17 in the wind and, just like they said, a very good gun platform!
Here's the livery:


It's in keeping with the gray and black scheme from his now-retired Nieuport.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/23/15 06:04 PM

duck


Just a reminder for all WOFF pilots, Its important to land at the correct Aerodrome. Avoid my mistake.


image upload no compression
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/23/15 06:09 PM

What are you talking about, it looks like they have a great plane for you to upgrade to! tomcat
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/23/15 06:35 PM

Squadron mate Rick!
Welcome aboard and I guess drinks are on you tonight eh?
And I just watched your vid. Guess I have a little competition now for top dog in the squadron.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/23/15 07:20 PM

beercheers bottles
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/23/15 09:01 PM

I find the SE5 to be much like an albatros, but better the turns. Your gunnery percent should improve. Wiggle if they are crossing your path, bob if you are on their tail.

Have fun and don't die.
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/23/15 09:12 PM

Rick, you could have had him @ 1:37, squeeze when your leading your target and let him fly into your stream of bullets, then wag the rudder when you see him take hits. You kicked their butts anyway...probably doesn't matter, just a suggestion
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/23/15 09:19 PM

I wanted to give them a moment to admire my paint job! winkngrin
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/23/15 09:40 PM

Can't link to show the video, but i was reminded of this old episode from what carrick58 posted....

http://www.imdb.com/video/hulu/vi467445529


and a wiki about it....
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Last_Flight_(The_Twilight_Zone)
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/23/15 09:41 PM

Originally Posted By: Rick_Rawlings
I wanted to give them a moment to admire my paint job! winkngrin


It is a very nice one too...
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/23/15 10:19 PM

Ahh, anudder 1

Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/23/15 11:20 PM

Thanks MudWasp, that has always been one of my favorite episodes.
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/23/15 11:32 PM

My pleasure, sorry I coudn't link to a youtube of the tv version. I rather like the radio version better. I just close my eyes and let the story be told through my ears and my imagination draws the picture show in my head.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/24/15 09:29 AM

May 2 1917 on a sunny Wednesday leading 3 others of B Flight on the afternoon Line Patrol. Arrive at our patrol point, after losing one flight mate to engine trouble, and after a few circles I see 4 specks off to our front. Obtain a good position and order the attack on 4 V-Strutters. A Flight, despite having their "reaction time" turned up via OldHats mod, does not help...again. Also turned OFF Cloud Shadows as an experiment.



For a couple of minutes I start to get nervous as these Huns are good. Checked the "PilotClaims" file later and at least 3 out of 4 were HA's. I receive minor hits on 3 occasions before I finally get behind one but another is inching up on my tail. My flight is in action though so I shake him and get behind another Hun.
After a 3 second burst with both Lewis and Vickers Wilhelm Groos lights up and goes down.


After watching him for a second there are still aircraft around. Make for two, hoping they are my flight, but nope. More Huns. After some frantic maneuvering I make a good deflection shot (real good - don't think I fired more then 10 rounds) and the Hun goes down out of control. I think he is faking at first but Hans Klein goes down apparently dead in his seat.


See more aircraft and Hun AA down low so I make for the action. The first aircraft I come across is another Hun. Make a diving attack but, due to my speed, only have time for a quick shot. Break off in a zoom climb and receive hits from the ground fire. I decide enough is enough and fly away but the Hun is apparently mad and follows me. Sounds good as I lead him away from the AA and gain separation in my speedy Se5. After a minute I honk around in a turn but this guy is also good. Several turns and almost head-on passes I get behind him and shoot his wings off. Alfred Osterreicher goes down for his final landing.


Out of Lewis and down to 100 rounds of Vickers I make for British Lines. I see no other aircraft except as I cross the lines. Oh, its Captain Ball leading A Flight working on their tans I guess. Back at base I file claims for my 3 but we lost one flight member.
2 out of my 3 victories are confirmed making it 24. I receive the VC and a promotion to Major. Feel a little bad as Captain Ball has 40+ kills and will have to be dead before he gets the VC. Thought about retiring my Major but 56 had a Major flight commander in January 1918 so maybe I will keep him for a while. Probably take a bit of leave.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/24/15 02:15 PM

The iron fist strikes again! Great report, Duke!
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/24/15 02:57 PM

Thank you sir!
Now that you are aboard I gotta stay sharp.
Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/24/15 07:19 PM

You truly are living that latin motto I gave you, nice job.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/25/15 12:15 AM

Man, I thought I was going to come up with bupkis for you today, Duke. I ran two Rother Nought flights earlier and got nothing except a few days in the hospital for getting wounded on an airfield attack run. Switching back to Rick Rawlings, we were sent out on a friendly patrol. After finding nothing, I was not willing to give up. I mean, I had some of the greatest talent in Great Britain flying history;


Rawlings, Ball, Rhys-Davids, The Professor, Mary Ann, did anyone think I was just going to go back home without firing a shot?!?

So we set out on the Grand Tour of Hunland trying to find anybody to take on! Due to real life constraints, I usually use lots of time compression to have time to fly missions, but this was the longest real-time sojourn I have taken:


Finally, after looking high and low, we found some enemies to attack. It wasn't very sporting:

Of course, that far in enemy territory, with everyone scattering, the Albatros wasn't confirmed, but we know!
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/25/15 09:42 AM

I know right?
56 is THE stud squadron and chock full of superstars.
Did a no-HA (Aces 0) campaign with them once and it felt really odd so I restarted with full HA.
As a practical matter attrition is so high in WOFF that the squadrons strength was always real low and stayed there as new guys came and quickly died.
The game, as designed, almost needs indestructble HA's to seem "normal" in play at least in my somewhat limited no-HA play.

And, as stupid as this sounds, by taking them out of the campaign I felt that their great work and sacrifice, and that of the other aces, was being erased and forgotten.
99.99999% of the population would not have a clue as to those names and I wonder how long it will be till they are totally out of human memory and just names in dusty old books no one reads. Whew. Sorry for that Memorial Day tangent. I have personally known men and friends who have made the greatest sacrifice for this country and are now gone and unknown except to me and other guys from our unit and their family. Maybe they'll get a Wall someday.
I always think of Roy Batty and his ending monologue.

Anyway nice flight. 56 would be proud and that's how they flew. Always aggressive.
HIGHLY recommend the book "High in the Empty Blue"!

Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/25/15 11:51 AM

Dear Hannah,

After spending a good fortnight or so at a place called "XXXXXX Farm" near XXXXXX, (We called it Mutton Farm since that was all they ever served in the mess) I've finally arrived in France, or am I in Belgium? (Geography was never my strong suit as you well know and who cares anyway, one bloody wog country is the same as any other to me) Anyway, the point is I'm here, at the front, at last!

I'm afraid my first two flights haven't particularly endeared me to my fellow aviators in number 1 Squadron, RFC but more on that later my dear, firstly I must tell you about our beastly billet. They've put us up in some grim old place called XXXXXXX Asylum (Which nobody can pronounce so we call it "Billy-O" Asylum), supposedly the last inhabitants were somewhat compromised in terms of their sanity, little has changed, so the witticists say, but that the uniforms are much sharper now. I've had a bit of a poke around the place while the mechanical people organised a plane for me and there are all kinds of strange rooms or cells about the estate, most of them are full of RFC gear now but I shudder to think of the poor souls that must once have inhabited them howling at the moon on a frosty froggy night eh! A far cry from the endless plains of Australia what? My dear girl, did you know that we customarily let the loonies wander out into the desert and sort themselves out? Much cleaner and safer for everyone you see, the desert tells no tales my silly, dear little tulip.

I went for a wander of my own but of a different kind earlier today, across the jolly lines to see Master Fritz himself can you believe it. Not that I could see much mind you, we were up at 8,500 feet and there was a fair bit of cloud about but I could see little flashes here and there along the front (Which is mile upon endless mile of shell craters! You wouldn't believe that so many cannon shells could ever have been produced, let alone wasted on digging up swathes of French farmland.)

Before I go on I suppose I should tell you that today was my second sortie, my first met with ignominy at the hands of my own eagerness I'm afraid. On that day I was awoken early in the morning and informed that we were to head over the lines "toot sweet", as the French say, with a deliver of high explosive for the minions of the Kaiser. Unfortunately in the half light and concurrent rush to be airborne I didn't glean a particularly good grasp of the mechanical arrangement whereby such explosive material was to be detached from the aircraft and concurrently delivered by bombs to a nearby French cow paddock rather than the front-line German trenches as intended.

My salvo had the mixed fortune of abruptly terminating the life of the sole occupant of the field, one elderly french cow, much to the chagrin of the frog bloke who owned it and who came knocking even before I had landed demanding extravagant compensation for the loss of his bovine chattel. Sir Salmond (That's our Commanding Officer and a right frosty gentleman he is too!) was having none of it and sent the fellow away with half a crown and a set of ears burning from a lecture about how we must "all tighten our belts and do our bit against the Bosche". After the Frenchman had been ejected from the CO's office I was gestured inside by the Adjutant and so I marched in, stopping before his desk and saluting as smartly as I know how, feeling all the while as though my stomach was trying to crawl out my ears. His lordship didn't appear to be overly phased by my misadventure however, he simply asked me what had gone wrong and I explained to him that I had been testing the security of the position of the bomb release wire when the aircraft had hit a patch of rough air, the rest is history. "Not a good start Sergeant, be more careful next time" was all Sir Salmond said but I got the feeling that a few of the chaps were laughing up their sleeves at me in the mess that night and I'm sure I heard a muffled "Moo" or two being emitted, along with sidelong glances and chuckles at my expense.

That brings me to today where I actually had a chance to take my silly little aeroplane across the lines and try chucking another set of bombs at the Jerries. Mind you, I don't call it a silly little aeroplane for no good reason my darling. They call the ridiculous thing a "Morane Parasol" which, to me, sounds more like a french whore's accoutrement than a proper name for an aeroplane. Back at Mutton Farm we flew the good old Quirk which is as solid and dependable a machine as the day is long but this Parasol is a dicey thing. (This is what what happens when you buy second hand rubbish from the bloody frogs.) Sitting inside the thing I can only see forwards and a bit below and too the sides since the cockpit is directly underneath the wing and behind me the observer obscures all but the slightest view of what is going on to the aft of the wheelhouse, so to speak. My observer is a solid chap though, a Captain named Walter. Goodness only knows why the gave me a Captain to ferry around! I'm lucky he's a fairly happy-go-luck sort who doesn't go in for standing on ceremony. "Just pay attention to what's going on around you and do your job" Captain Walter says and I agree with him whole heartedly.

But I digress terribly my dear, the night draws on and the candle grows short so I shall expedite the narrative!

We took off for some place named XXXXX (Which, once again, nobody can pronounce) as there is a major offensive there right now and the Huns amassed at XXXXXX need to be bombed regularly. This time I managed to keep the bombs attached to my grid until the requisite moment and everything went famously! I think I might have even hit the right side of France which is a relief to agriculturalists everywhere I'm sure. I must say however that it was a dashed difficult flight to the lines, what with the bombs and a full load of fuel on board I had considerable trouble keeping my craft in proper trim. I wandered across the path of A flight once or twice during the show and Captain Walter treated me to a good, hard clout across the noggin each time. (He's only easy going in matters that don't involve direct threats to his health and safety you see?)

Well we made it home in one piece anyway and some sport from the trenches actually took the trouble to call up and tell us that we'd done a marvelous job apparently, knocking out a couple of machine gun emplacements or some such so we're off to town to celebrate before the next show. Speaking of which I'd best start getting ready bu before I do my love, never fear. No French harlot will turn the eye of your beloved Sergeant "X", nor will Hunnish shot or shell impugn his valorous and holy crusade in the name of the might of the British Empire. Expect to hear from me again as soon as I a have time to write, I'll try to send a letter a month.

Lovingly yours; in body, mind and soul,

Sergeant "X".

P.S. Whatever you do don't show this letter to ANYBODY! Especially not your parents, the musn't know we speak like this too each other, they wouldn't understand.

P.P.S I'll be wearing my wedding ring very openly tonight and ever onwards. I keep it on a chain around my neck when I fly just to be safe.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/25/15 12:20 PM

Nice write up JB.
It's gonna be a long war.
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/25/15 01:02 PM

I know right? It's May 1915 and I'm delivering ordnance in "Pin the tail on the donkey fashion" from a flying French brothel at 8,500ft in airspace soon to be thick with murderous #%&*$# Eindeckers.

At least the beastly Froggy sun won't blemish my fair skin, not while I'm safely under my parasol!

Disclaimer: I'm not prejudiced against the French, Belgians, Germans or anyone in particular. (Especially if they make good beer) I'm just writing in the parlance of the times.
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/25/15 01:51 PM

JimmyBlonde;

Excellent report Sir! You had me in stitches several times! I know I will be anxiously awaiting further episodes of the exploits of "The Sergeant"!

Cheers to you!
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/25/15 02:05 PM

Well done, Sergeant X! Live long and prosper!
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/27/15 01:30 AM

Boy, switching up between the SE5a and the Sopwith Pup requires some mental overhauling...at least that's the story I am sticking with! So I am a little off my game in the first part of the fight...

Anyway, back with Rother Nought flying with the 3rd Royal Naval Squadron, don't you know. We were sent up on a line patrol to the Wilderness between Monchy and Cambrai, looking at tall Cumulus stacks at 9000 feet, our patrol height. We had only turned into our northwesterly patrol pattern for a few minutes when we were attacked by Albatros scouts diving from about 800 feet above us. Turning to meet them, I was able to identify them as the older DII model, not the newer DIII. Still, these were plenty dangerous:

When we got back to the aerodrome, I claimed the first one Driven Down, the second: Destroyed. Both were confirmed the next day.
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/27/15 02:46 AM

I'll have to watch in the Weee hours of the morning.
May I say what I think of your gunnery?
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/27/15 02:58 AM

Ha! Well, I already told you it starts off bad! neaner
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/27/15 03:11 AM

I'll be constructive....haven't watched yet... did you bob and wag when on target...

... ok I'll watch... report back soon
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/27/15 03:41 AM

Cough...snort... sneezeee.... xxx3333.....

Didn't see a bad ending... unless you were suckered into dropping even more altitude.

Ya don't check your arse enough... '6 O'Clock.

Gunnerey is better, I saw you shoot on a lead and that was good
A) You gave up altitude and future delfection to be right on their 6 O'Clock....what a waste of advantage... and future Turn & Burns!
B) Altitude is ENERGYyyyyy.... don't be so easy to give it up. Granted the PuP is great at gainoing it.....Don't get suckered into a falling altitude fight over enemy lines. It's a different story if it occurs on you side of the MUD.

!!!...1111.... slow down and take your time desimating your rivals, and keep you altitude!!!!!

A) At least ya didn't shed a wing this this time in a dive after them.....
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/27/15 09:24 AM

April 23, 1917. Per "High in the Empty Blue" the first real day of offensive patrols for 56 Squadron as the first two weeks in France were spent "polishing up" (nicest word I can think of) the Se5 for combat. This is actually reflected in the WOFF Campaign Manager - of course! salute So Sergeant DIH begins his new campaign this date.
Morning DOP, about 10 miles into Hunland, with 4 man B Flight in nice weather. Being a new guy (and a lowly Sergeant) I follow the patrol leader and we finally see 4 Huns, 9 miles back, and about 1000' feet higher then us. The patrol leader, not being timid, orders the attack.

Unfortunately he turns away from them and I, not thinking that's a good plan, change course toward them and fly directly at them. No sense giving them a nice easy attack path.


And there they are in their nice shiny V-Strutters! Hopefully I can scuff that paint work up a bit.


My plan works, I think, as this one corkscrews down to attack me and, because of the approach angles, we start combat more or less at a equal state. He is quite good and I have a tough time getting behind him until after two almost head-on passes I get a quick burst into him head-on, score hits, and this changes his thinking and he cuts the wrong way allowing me to get behind him. I shoot until he starts to smoke and, possibly wounded, he begins to fly erratically. This allows me to get close behind him and really load him up with Vickers and Lewis. I expect him to blow up, lose a wing, or burn, but he just noses over and goes straight down to his doom.


There are several aircraft at my level flying around and I try to join up, or engage, but never quite get close enough. The Hun AA finally stops in the area so I figure my flight has departed the scene or are down. I circle a few more times and see, about 2000' above me, 8 or 10 specks that are Huns! Time to go I reckon as I am 10 miles behind the lines and low and I pass over the burning grave of my late foe on the way out...S!


On the way out I come across a damaged SE, flying low, and provide a high escort for him. He is so low he attracts much ground fire but manages to cross the lines and lands at a advance field. See a lot of other aircraft flying about but they are all friendly. Back at base I file my claim for 1 Albatros and my wingman who suffered combat damage (2nd Lt Goon) also puts in for one. Of the two others one is down on a friendly field (HA) and one crashes (shot down?) but survives (HA). Confirmation is pending with the stock WOFF system.
I then trudge to the NCO Mess for some tea (that I probably have to make myself) but happy I got a Hun on my first time over. Hopefully someone saw it!
And I can see why I don't post videos! Hehe...
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/28/15 12:54 AM

Originally Posted By: DukeIronHand
April 23, 1917. So Sergeant DIH begins his new campaign this date.

Wait, what happened to your other guy in 56 squad?


Originally Posted By: DukeIronHand

And I can see why I don't post videos! Hehe...


Oh, come on! You have to take some of the heat off me! thumbsup
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/28/15 08:24 AM

I made some campaign changes and, when I make changes, I always feel a need for a restart.
Plus he was a Major and VC winner, so short of being nominated for Pope, he has about done it all.
He went to HE as an Instructor. After that, as a Major, he will probably be back to France as a Squadron Commander...maybe in time for the 1918 Hun spring offensive.
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/29/15 10:07 AM

You blokes seem to be having an enjoyable time in those SE's! Can't wait to get my hands on one, it's probably my favourite WW1 aircraft.

And thank you for the kind comments, now, hold onto your hats because Sgt 'X' has been busy again.


9th May, 1915

Dear diary,

Yes, now I'm talking to a bloody book, won't be long before I feel as though I truly belong here in Billy-o asylum.

Well diary, there are two types of things that happen in life, things that you can tell your dear, loving wife about and things that you ought not to. When it comes to war in the air it is better, for all of our sake's that I record what I am about to tell you here an not in a letter to my darling Hannah who would most certainly be unnecessarily alarmed by the news that I have today!

I've been assigned the privilege of a rather feisty Yorkshireman named Tony Walter as my observer and Captain Walter is one of these types who are mad keen to get to grips with the Hun. It's not enough for him that we should tootle along in our French umbrellas and chuck pathetically small bombs at them, oh no, Captain Walter is mad keen on the idea that we ought to be chasing their aircraft as well!

Now what kind of anarchy this type of sport shall lead to is obvious to even the tenderest of initiates in aerial warfare and it shan't be long before men of Captain Walter's mind-set are chasing each other up and down the front attempting to destroy each other's machines. I'm not overly keen on the idea myself since it involves more risk than seems prudent but I have to concede to Walter's experience and the instinctive feeling I have in my gut that investing time in studying this practice now will pay off in the long run. It's largely at Walter's behest that out Parasols are fitted with Lewis guns, he has been avidly petitioning Sir Salmond for some time for license to chase down Hun aviators and Sir Salmond is inclined to humour him despite the raised eyebrows he has received from HQ on the topic.

Walter wasted no time in appraising me of his philosophy of air combat and, as a good obedient little NCO I have little choice but to go along with the his scheme, not completely unwillingly as it does sound like capital sport if rather chancy. Walters idea is that we should attempt to close with an enemy aircraft and open up upon it with the Lewis gun if the chance should present itself and we have discussed how best to achieve this at length and into the early hours of the night.

Today we got our first real chance, it was on a bombing trip to the locale of Havrincourt. I'd seen my first barrage, Hun balloon, Hun Archie and as Havrincourt came into view Walter tapped me on the shoulder and I turned to see my first genuine, bona fide German aeroplanes. Aviatiks Walter told me later and there were three of them, slightly above and well behind us and they were watching curiously, but from a respectful distance, as we dropped our 40lb bombs on their field, destroying one of their hangars in the process (Smashing!). Seeing that we were done with our mischief they began to put down to land. Captain Walter urged me to follow them, a manic gleam in his blue eyes revealing itself as he gesticulated at the rearmost aircraft and leaned out of the rear cockpit towards it as though he wished to wrestle the thing from the air with his hands.

The German was below us now and a ways ahead. Walter and I had discussed our tactic and decided that we could probably overhaul an enemy aircraft and take a shot at him as we drew ahead before climbing back to safer heights. I wasn't entirely happy about the fact that we were still over their field and that observers on the ground may fire at us, especially since out pursuit would involve losing height behind the lines which would leave us on a sticky wicked if something should go amiss with the engine but it was clear that Walters fever for action would not be denied and, with an inward sigh I pressed forward on the stick and began my descent toward the Aviatik.

The distance closed rapidly between us, I held the stick forward as far as I dared as the air-frame of our Morane creaked and shuddered and I was about to overhaul the Aviatik when I noticed a stream of traced emanating from the rear cockpit of the enemy. It seemed as though we had encountered a German made in the mold of our very own Captain Walter in this chap and he gave us a good squirt as we closed. I dithered a bit at this point, not sure whether to continue the pursuit or call it off and it wasn't until the second burst from the Hun smacked into our wing, leaving a neat row of holes, that I decided enough was enough. My more sensible side said that I'd done my patriotic duty and it was time to desist in this nonsense before we got into serious trouble so I eased back on the stick and we climbed away on course for home.

Captain Walter was a little more subdued than usual this evening and in our tactical discussion we decided that more prudence would be called for, that we should seek our quarry closer to the lines and that we should only attack from a position that would allow us to overfly the enemy before descending so that we might be ahead of him when we came into gunnery range since. I have to say though, that despite my initial misgivings I'm showing signs of catching this fever myself. The next time we find ourselves on a suitable bombing trip we have plans to detach ourselves from the formation after our duty is done and do a little free-lancing!

1 Squadron en route to Havrincourt

Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/29/15 10:31 AM

Tuesday, March 13 1917 Flieger DIH flies the afternoon patrol with Jasta 11. The morning patrol resulted in no contact.
For the afternoon we have been assigned a airfield defense mission but as the target is quite a ways back I don't expect much. The pesky Britishers had other plans though. Kurt Wolff leads the 4 man Kette with me and two other non-HA's while the Jasta big guns are flying "support." Near our objective my wingman peels off apparently the victim of a engine problem. Suddenly coming out of a cloud are a group of the enemy. Friendly AA is not sleeping and they open up right away but the aircraft are pretty close. No choice but to engage.

Oh good. It's 5 N17's vs our 3 Alb DIII (Early). *Sigh*


Remembering Dicta Olham I turn for them and try to stay directly underneath them while I wait my chance. In my mad circling I see a group of specks that I guess is Kette Eins but as far as I know they do not help. Its a chaotic time as I turn and maneuver trying to keep the impudent British off my tail. Lose about 8000' in altitude when suddenly its just me vs one N17. Keeping my old crate on the edge of a stall neither of us can get an advantage and, down very low, the Britisher makes a break for his lines. My old Alb does its best to catch up, and I thought I was fairly close, so I lean over my sight and fire! Huzzah! NOT! Later in the Debrief I got 1 hit out of 95 rounds!
He, now understandably upset about my single bullet hole in his machine turns and the fight is on again at low level. After a couple of turns I lose sight of him and checking behind my see another one on my tail. Geesh. Low level with a Nieuport on your arse is not the way to go so I turn for a nearby airfield and friendly AA discourages his pursuit.

Figuring I used up my luck for the day I return home with an empty bag and bullet holes for my trouble. But I guess I am learning - I am still alive!


Back at base I see Kurt Wolff fired 1 round and was shot down for his trouble and the other non-HA didn't get off a shot, was wounded, but landed okay. My "wingman" was forced to land with engine trouble prior so he missed the show. No claims are made and Kette Eins never engaged - or a least never fired a shot.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/30/15 06:00 PM

Coming back from a Balloon bust in late March, 1917, Rother Nought spied a flight of 3 un-escorted German recon craft returning from doing their dirty business. Not allowing this to stand, he moved in and signaled the attack:

*I changed my mind from attacking the right-most craft, as it looked like everyone else was going for him, so please excuse my lame first shots as I settled onto my new target!
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/30/15 06:18 PM

Nice shooting.
Ever hit a plane with the Le Prieur rockets?
Ever tried?
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/30/15 07:15 PM

Originally Posted By: DukeIronHand
Nice shooting.
Ever hit a plane with the Le Prieur rockets?
Ever tried?


It's funny you mention that, I usually save them from balloon busting missions for that very purpose, then always forget about them in the heat of battle! duh I have only remembered once (a miss). This time I accidentally fired them off before we even got to the balloon when I bumped the fire button on my keyboard...
Posted By: OldHat

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/30/15 07:18 PM

I tried it just for fun and finally hit one after about 6 tries. I had to go in low and climb up fast to avoid being shredded by the rear gunner. Looks like three rockets missed and the rest hit.

IMHO, it's too risky to be of any use in campaign.

Oh! and BTW, great reports guys.


Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/30/15 08:38 PM

And the quest for scientific knowledge rolls on.
In another timeline they would be called AIM-9 OldHat instead of AIM-9 Sidewinder after their WW1 inventor.

And speaking of knowledge I didn't know the Camel ever carried Le Prieur's.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/30/15 10:06 PM

Originally Posted By: OldHat

IMHO, it's too risky to be of any use in campaign.



Yeah, but that was still an AWESOME shot! thumbsup
Posted By: Lewis

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/31/15 12:54 AM

I managed to get a kill with LePrieurs in a Nupe 17. I was out of ammo on a balloon hunt where we got jumped, but ran off two Albatri after my wingmen made a kill on the third, ( didn't get the balloon..) on the way home we encountered 3 DFWs below us and I dived at them from the side and used my speed to get a quick climbing zoom at the belly of the lead plane. At 100 meters, I fired off all the rockets and BOOM! one flaming DufFWagen. Of course the other two peppered me mercilessly. Just barely made it back to base with fuel leak and sick engine.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/02/15 09:01 AM

April 1 1917 on the morning patrol with J11. Flieger DIH is on his first patrol with is new Jasta in poor weather.
Several formations are sighted and then lost in the heavy clouds before we finally latch onto a group of 3 or 4 Sopwith Pups. The Kette Leader orders the attack.

Maneuvering for the attack. Nothing special here just thought it was a cool shot.


Finally get into a 1 on 1 fight with a Pup and best him.


After a final burst from my Spandau's his smoking crate goes down and crashes near a German airfield.


In the afternoon patrol on the 1st both Kettes engage a group of French N23's and slaughter them with 4 being claimed by both Kettes. Almost had a claim but he, spinning down, recovered low near LvR who finished him off.

April 2 1917 on morning patrol. The weather is much nicer and near our patrol destination the Kette Leader makes to attack a group of 3 rare DH2's who are apparently strafing a German troop encampment. He changes his mind half way down maybe seeing something else. I continue and see 1 DH2 has been forced to land intact by ground fire leaving two. Begin a combat with both and get behind one and, leaning over my sights, get in good hits and he lights up and goes down. Look for the other Britisher but he has disappeared either being shot down by AA or flying off. Seeing no friendly aircraft I make for home.


Get back to base and find that my Pup from yesterday has been confirmed and I receive the the Silver Cup for my first victory as I put in a claim for today's DH2. Two of the other Kette members crash their birds for unknown reasons as they didn't fire a shot.
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/02/15 12:33 PM

Duke, some fine screenies there, and you are correct, the first one is definitely cool. A classic portrait type with those clouds behind it!
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/04/15 07:45 AM

Thanks Robert!
April 2 1917 on the afternoon patrol with J11.

En route to the front. The weather has been fine for the first couple days of April.


"Beware the Hun in the su..." Hey wait. Air activity is high as the Entente begins work preparing for something big. What are they up too?


Yikes. The dreaded Nieuports. In this fight I score nothing but stay alive which is a win based on my track record vs Nieuports. Did pick up a couple of hits from ground fire trying to chase a Nieuport down low. Oh well.

Back at base I join the other NCO pilots and am told my DH2 from yesterday was denied. Wonder if I was an officer would they still take the ground gunners word over mine?

April 3 1917. Another fine weather day. We come across some Sopwith Pups north of Lens and I manage to shoot one down and put in a claim.
Afternoon patrol the Kette swarms on a lone Nieuport but I fly top cover while Schafer shoots it down. While circling to join up I see, up high, 5 specks being followed by an additional 4. As they are coming from British territory I figure its two-seaters escorted by some scouts. I keep my distance waiting for a possible chance if the Kette can get up here. Okay...one of the presumed single seaters shoots down another aircraft in flames. Guess they are Germans being chased by the British. Watching my poor countrymen riding a flaming chariot I stray too close and one of the British peels off and dives for me. I circle a bit to evaluate as the lone plane approaches. A Triplane! Luckily his pals stay high so it is mano a mano. I turn into him and the dance begins. We circle each other, neither gaining an edge, as the fight corkscrews down. Finally, down low, he loses his nerve and tries to make a break but I am on him. With two 3 second bursts of my Spandaus he goes out of control and crashes into the British reserve area.
Fly back to base trying to avoid all the aircraft specks over my head and I make it back without incident.
Put in a claim for the Triplane and am told the KFlak 98 already rang up reporting my downed Triplane. As a bonus Air Defense units confirmed my Pup from the morning and I am awarded the IC2 for my 3rd confirmed victory. *Sorry for no pics for April 3. I was so busy trying to be a serious Flieger that I forgot*
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/04/15 07:49 PM

April 4 1917 morning patrol of the front with the elite of the German Air...blah...blah...proud Flieger DIH is flying...blah...blah...blah!

At our patrol point over the front the 5 man Kette circles for a few when we are joined by 5 Spad VII (150) contesting this section of airspace.
The Kette Leader orders the attack. Looking good so far.


Literally about 1 1/2 seconds after the above shot was taken I hear a horrible noise. Quickly glance to the left and see the patrol leader has collided with a member of the Kette.
Both go down. Now it is 3 of us vs 5 Spads. Get on the tail of one and during the circle look to my right and see some specks. The Support Flight?


No, of course not! It's 6 Nieuports coming to help their friends like good comrades do. Are you taking notes here Kette Eins leader? We continue the fight with 3 of us vs 11 of them.


Anyway I soon forget about scoring kills and take snap shots hoping to just score damage so they will break off. Pull up real steep to avoid a collision with a Nieuport and while I hang there a Spad puts a burst into my left wing. Spin and dive out alternatively followed by 1 Spad and two Nieuports, evade, now its two Nieuports, etc, etc. This goes on until I run out of altitude so I am now out of luck. The old Alb is a quite average performer. Get free and clear for about 30 seconds and think I might make it when tracers come whizzing by my ears. Glance back and have at least 2 Nieuports behind me. Turn for a nearby German field for AA cover and maybe a quick landing but nope. More hits and I lose control of the plane plowing into a field at 100 MPH.
To end on a positive note at least I will get a good burial for my 3 victory, IC2 winning, Fliger and the LGMS Wind mod seemed pretty cool after one flight. More testing needed though.
What career next? Hmmm...
Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/04/15 08:22 PM

I'd suggest the Alsace, nice quiet little section of the front and the scenery is beautiful.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/04/15 09:50 PM

June 16 1917 Sgt. DIH flying his first patrol with 11 Squadron. This will be a Line Patrol. These boys have just recently traded their Fee's for Brisfits and are all excited. And it will show.
Flying to the front in beautiful sunny weather. We circle for quite a while and see no Huns. Probably because they are being crowded out of the sky by all the RFC flying around.


Just inside Hun territory the Flight Leader wags his wings as I was looking the other way. 5 or 6 Huns! These two will play a personal part in the upcoming scrap. We dive to attack and the enemy accepts the challenge and noses up to greet us.


After a circle or two I find myself behind this one and shot him up. My Vickers hammers and my shooting is good. Suddenly I start to take hits. Look behind me and see a Bristol about 200' away. You stupid SOB I think then look again and see the Alb with the black wavy stripe on my left rear guns flashing. Not sure if its his guns I hear or my observers but I quickly roll out to avoid. Evade and find my original target again and see his engine is stopped. I close up and, putting my sights in the cockpit, open up again at point blank range then have to break left to avoid a collision. Look over my shoulder and he is corkscrewing down to crash just south of a town,


Climbing back into the fight I see one speck chasing another. The hunted is the all black Alb from the second photo. For whatever reason the Bristol breaks off his dive (we are pretty low) and the Hun tries to make good his escape. I turn and dive after him and cut my throttle as I get behind him at roof top height over Atheles. A three second burst with the Vickers and he noses over and plows into a city street at full speed and is now just scrap lumber and metal.


Seeing no one else around I climb for friendly lines and see my flight all landing at a forward field and do so also. Everybody has returned safely but one Brisfit has a wobbly landing and it turns out that both the pilot and the observer are wounded. I put in a claim for my two and other flight members claim three. A good day for the RFC.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/04/15 11:04 PM

Nice, Duke! Loved the Brisfit for the three missions I flew in it before my squad mate plowed into me from behind!
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/04/15 11:26 PM

Yes. I have seen a couple of collisions lately (and died in one months ago) so during the initial formation break-up on enemy sighting I have been doing so most gingerly!

As for the Brisfit she is a great bird. I have (yet!) to feel overmatched fighting an Alb. Between that, the Se, and N17 are the machines that get 95% of my Entente flight time. I also am a big fan of the Camel but there just ain't enough hours in a week.
And, sorry Mom, my luck flying the Alb is absolutely horrible. I am pretty handy with it until I get into those fights where we are at a big numerical disadvantage, especially against Nieuports, and, unfortunately, those are not overly rare!
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/05/15 10:29 PM

Well. Rother Nought and the boys from #3 Naval Squadron got their keisters kicked today! Started off well enough as a deep patrol into enemy territory. They ran into a flight of V Strutters that really knew what they were doing. While diving on one attacking his wingman, Nought was wounded by another scout that dove in behind him! He was just able to fight the Albatros to a stalemate, after which he broke off and was happy to finally see friendly territory. Nought set down seeping blood from a clean wound to the left torso, just clearing the lung. He'll be out for 11 days.

As you can see, the rest of the flight fared no better:

Bloody April, indeed!

* I am happy to say that my TrackIR showed up and is working fabulously! The ability to zoom in on a target and actually have some chance to tell what you are looking at is fantastic!
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/05/15 11:05 PM

Yow.
Rough day In the war.
Hopefully tomorrow A.M. I will avenge your boys sir.

EDIT: Apparently vengeance will be delayed. Flew two patrols with 11 in nice weather but no combat. Saw some black tail Albs on the first but the formation.leader didn't like the set-up.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/06/15 11:35 PM

Nought was transferred to Naval #8, with the triplane. For today's sortie, he led his flight over the lines for a good 'ole balloon bust near Athies. Completing that with no great difficulties, he decided to probe around Hun-land for a bit. As they were making their way politely back to their own side of the lines, they encountered a flight of Rolands doing the same thing. Feeling magnanimous, Nought was about to let bygones be bygones and allow the two-seaters pass unmolested, when they moved to attack him! Well, imagine the indignity! It was no holds barred at that point!

Of course, then the numbskull forgot to submit a claims form, so... NO CLAIMS FOR YOU!!!!!!
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/07/15 12:14 AM

Doh!
Did that one time on my only 3 victory mission flying an Alb vs a trio of Fee's.
I was so smug and self satisfied after the mission I blew right by the Claim button.
I feel your pain.

EDIT: Is it the tiny viewing screen on my phone or do you have your FOV stepped out a bit?
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/07/15 12:31 AM

It's as far back as it will go, but the video always exaggerates it for some reason...
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/07/15 05:34 PM

Rother Nought flying with the 8th Naval
Today he headed out with clear skies to attack an enemy airfield with two wingman. One of them had to drop out due to mechanical problems shortly after takeoff which left a fairly anemic attack force to approach the airfield with. Two Vickers, no bombs and no rockets does not an intimidating threat make. Still, Nought carried on resolutely, taking in many of the sights that makes a WOFF flight always worthwhile:

The most dedicated farmer you've ever seen:

Nought had often heard the praises of German engineering being sung, but he never knew they were referring to the train engineers!

That's some skilled driving indeed!
Seeing an artillery barrage off on the front is always invigorating:

Plus he got a chance to take in his new livery:

In fact, it was shaping up to be a great mission right up until the game crashed... banghead
But thanks to Monseigneur Wiggins, we are restored and ready to try again! thumbsup
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/07/15 07:24 PM

Ok, re-flown flight was much more exciting! This time, B flight from the 8th Naval was tasked with escorting a flight of Quirks across the lines to bomb an infantry formation south of Oppy. They all went over the lines together and Nought directed his flight in a zig-zag pattern, never letting his charges get too far out of sight. He expected the attack to come from above, not from below like a green and white snake in the grass...

Two seaters attacking two seaters? Did that even happen? Anyway, kill was not confirmed, which is OK, as everyone was pretty split up by then. But Rother Nought made Squadron Commander anyway!
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/07/15 08:14 PM

Oh yea.
The enterprising two-seater crew was not adverse to a little one on one with a enemy two-seater, or balloon for that matter, if the situation was good.
At least for the crazy RFC boys. I have read several accounts.
Have read about a couple of French hard-chargers in the 3 place Caudron that they treated like a "gun ship."
And I am sure the Germans played that game too if the situation was right.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/07/15 08:17 PM

Speaking of two-seaters I had my first combat vs a Roland this morning and I see what you mean.
Good lord.
I was shooting up one trying to avoid the observer (unsuccessfully as I was wounded) when his pal flew up on my rear like he was in a Alb and opened up.
Damn guys were going all "Brisfit" on me.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/08/15 11:17 PM

Fun fight today. Squadron Commander Nought led B flight up to the lines to spot a large formation of enemy aircraft seen approaching just south of Armentieres. For once, the enemies were right where they were supposed to be.



Making his way back home, Nought filed for an Albatros scout driven down with the engine out, however, by that time, there was no one near enough to confirm!


*Interesting note... on the way back, I ran into a flight of German Recce, 6 of them to one of me. In my dive-stressed plane, I didn't like those odds. I flew along for a while hoping to encounter some friendlies I could latch on to to join in attack. Eventually, I ran into A flight and hoped for a fight to develop. The Recce wing eventually turned back and A flight made no move to engage. Using labels, it didn't appear that either group noticed the other (both stayed on "patrol"). They were only about 3km apart at one point... Hard to tell what was going "through their minds" but the enemy planes definitely went back, so mission accomplished from my point of view!
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/09/15 12:17 AM

Success!
And I must say I am jealous of all the flight time you get in.
Can my other half come live with you?
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/09/15 12:56 AM

Heh, I think you get as many reports in as I do, but, sure, tell her to come on over. She can go shopping with my other half and we can both get some more flying in! pilot
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/09/15 01:31 AM

salute
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/14/15 11:32 PM

Well. Finally got a new SSD drive, everything loaded up, sussed out (thanks, OBD!) patched up (looks FANTASTIC!) and ready to go. So here is another in my line of completely successful attack runs against 2-seater formations that in no way involved any swear words at all! I even left the dead stick landing in for BKCason. (Yeah, it went that well...)
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/14/15 11:43 PM

Originally Posted By: Rick_Rawlings
Well. Finally got a new SSD drive, everything loaded up, sussed out (thanks, OBD!) patched up (looks FANTASTIC!) and ready to go. So here is another in my line of completely successful attack runs against 2-seater formations that in no way involved any swear words at all! I even left the dead stick landing in for BKCason. (Yeah, it went that well...)


Rick, some constructive criticism... next time fly past the formation. get well in front of them and then turn in to approach them from the front and slightly below. Take aim on the lead aircraft and give him hell and pass under him into a slight dive flying well past and then turn around for the attack on the rear staying below him. If you did damage on the first pass he will have fallen out of formation making the second pass much more to your advantage.


Just a suggestion.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/15/15 12:27 AM

Thanks Robert. Lou has also mentioned that before. My question is, isn't that a fairly ahistorical method of attack? I read that McCudden fine-tuned his sights and fired from really long range. Richenbacker talks about tricking one enemy gunner into expending all his ammo...that doesn't seem to be an option here. I believe the general idea was a low-back attack or a high dive. I don't seem to have a lot of luck with either. I am still kicking though! biggrin I have tried the front attack before, it just seems really out of character! salute
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/15/15 12:43 AM

Originally Posted By: Rick_Rawlings
Thanks Robert. Lou has also mentioned that before. My question is, isn't that a fairly ahistorical method of attack? I read that McCudden fine-tuned his sights and fired from really long range. Richenbacker talks about tricking one enemy gunner into expending all his ammo...that doesn't seem to be an option here. I believe the general idea was a low-back attack or a high dive. I don't seem to have a lot of luck with either. I am still kicking though! biggrin I have tried the front attack before, it just seems really out of character! salute


Out of character may be true, I don't know. In the end, I don't have enough stored historical knowledge to draw on and at any rate when I'm in combat in a mission I base my actions on proven techniques that work for me in the sim. I feel confident that if this technique would have worked in WWI it would have been used. It may have been but I haven't read of it myself. If the technique is questionable for historical accuracy, then whether to use it or not is up to your choice based on the frame of mind you wish to be in.

Best Regards
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/15/15 02:04 AM

Thanks, Robert. New backup utility seems to be working great, by the way! Had a forgot-to-plug-something-in related crash and everything came back great!

Second flight of the day, Nought was tasked with attacking the enemy airfield at Roucourt. This always seems a big useless with a couple of Vickers against the whole airfield. The only thing that usually makes it interesting is if the enemy shows up. This time, we arrived just as their A team was taking off. I slid in behind the tail-end charlie and started firing at him. His mates didn't like it, so they started firing at me. My mates didn't like that, so they jumped in too. And, of course, all the ground gunners didn't want to be left out! Needless to say, fun ensued!



Fortunately, the Albatros pilots went to Stormtrooper Targeting Academy and not Rear Observer Gunnery School, so I came out OK! Great mission! thumbsup
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/15/15 03:35 AM

Originally Posted By: Rick_Rawlings
Fun fight today. Squadron Commander Nought led B flight up to the lines to spot a large formation of enemy aircraft seen approaching just south of Armentieres. For once, the enemies were right where they were supposed to be.



Making his way back home, Nought filed for an Albatros scout driven down with the engine out, however, by that time, there was no one near enough to confirm!


*Interesting note... on the way back, I ran into a flight of German Recce, 6 of them to one of me. In my dive-stressed plane, I didn't like those odds. I flew along for a while hoping to encounter some friendlies I could latch on to to join in attack. Eventually, I ran into A flight and hoped for a fight to develop. The Recce wing eventually turned back and A flight made no move to engage. Using labels, it didn't appear that either group noticed the other (both stayed on "patrol"). They were only about 3km apart at one point... Hard to tell what was going "through their minds" but the enemy planes definitely went back, so mission accomplished from my point of view!



Excellent Tripe Fight! copter
Always watch your dive speed, and more importantly NOT MAKING TURNS at HIGH SPEED!!!!

Looked sweet! All I can give is tips for avoiding a busted wing.....
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/15/15 03:56 AM

Sorry if was acting as an arse....just the dwarf in me...
...Woff to watch GOT and route for Dwarfs and Dragons....
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/15/15 04:27 AM

It's okay, man. Stuff on the internet always comes across weird anyway, I just always assume everyone means it in the nicest way possible!

#teamkhaleesi
salute
Posted By: MFair

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/16/15 10:48 AM

Nice videos Rick. The Tripehound is always a favorite!
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/16/15 06:21 PM

She is a nice little bird!
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/18/15 12:39 AM

Rick Rawlings: "Sometimes I like to fly by myself..."
Member Of Other Squadron: "Go on solo patrol? What the devil for?"
Rick Rawlings: "Oh, no particular reason..."

Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/18/15 05:11 PM

With Rick Rawlings, No. 56 Squadron...
The Major takes the boys up for a jaunt over the lines. They encounter a flight of Rolands deep in enemy territory, of which you can see the results of below. After the fracas, Rawlings is trying to round everyone up when he notices his wingman is in trouble. He races off to the rescue!

Right after this, the Black Albatros' buddies showed up and Major Rawlings had to tuck tail and head for the front! Thank goodness for the speed of an Se5!
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/21/15 01:13 AM

From the personal log of Rother Nought:

"Some days, it isn't easy being the Squadron Commander. You know you are going to lose men, that is just part of the job. But when you are entrusted to protect and save others, and you aren't able to, that is the hardest failure to endure. Today we were tasked with escorting a flight of FE2bs southeast along the front down past Monchy to observe infantry emplacements. We took up position about 1500 feet up from the Fees, giving us a good view of the surrounding skies. As we approached the target area, we swung around in a big horizontal loop in the sky to scan for threats when we saw the Fees break off southwest across the lines, just like they were told to do if they spied a threat. Looking off to the northeast, I saw a flight of unknown craft angling to meet us at the same altitude.
Signalling the rest of the flight, we moved to intercept. As we closed, I saw them to be Albatros scouts, recognizing the cruel lines of their ramrod-straight wings as we merged. Coming around, I could see the black puffs of Archie following our retreating Fees in the distance, so at least I knew they were safe. I then turned my attention to our enemies. Twisting this way and that, I fired at several enemy scouts, observing when I could how my squad mates were doing. We were holding our own and I eventually managed to come around on one Albatros and fired a telling burst into the cowl in front of the cockpit. He started to dive and moments later, his engine burst into flames. In dread, I was sure I could hear the pilot's scream as he spiraled down to the firmament below.
I watched, transfixed, as he spiraled down through several rotations. Then an explosion pulled my attention back to the now: a Fee was on fire, going down to the North of my position! Inexplicably, the Fe2s had circled around and were now in the midst of the remaining enemy craft. Cursing this turn of events, I dove into the new maelstrom. We fought several of them off, but in the distance, I saw a long smoke trail as another Fee went down. Leaving the more than capable Sub-Lt Compston to chase after the remaining Albatros diving away from our location, Sub-Lt Booker and I turned westward to pursue the Fees and their attackers.
It was some time before we could close the gap, and we saw one more of the poor two-seaters go down in flames, but now the lone Albatros attacking them was over our territory and it was his turn to flee for home. As he made his way to the east, we cut him off and were on him. His engine was flat out as he tried to make his side of the lines, little realizing that I would have followed him down to his airfield in pursuit. I closed to close range and fired, at which point he dove down in a spiral. Following and firing when I could, I chased him to the very ground, where our own infantry began to fire upon him. It cheered my heart to see their guns erupting at him, until in their exuberance they began to hit me as well! Soon their shots took their toll on my adversary and, like the knight who dies from a thousand cuts, the German went down slowly to crash in No Man's Land and flip over. I later learned that the pilot had died from no less than seven gunshot wounds!
We had lost 3 of the flight of Fees, but the Germans had paid dearly: we shot down six of their scouts, with no loss from my flight. I am glad that I do not have to write any letters of condolence for my men, but it doesn't make it any easier when I think of the airmen in the Fees who will now never gain the experience that would have saved their lives today..."

Posted By: CatKnight

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/21/15 06:16 AM

Originally Posted By: Rick_Rawlings
Rick Rawlings: "Sometimes I like to fly by myself..."
Member Of Other Squadron: "Go on solo patrol? What the devil for?"
Rick Rawlings: "Oh, no particular reason..."



Oh...Oh LOL! That made my morning.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/01/15 12:33 AM

Leaving behind the excitement of 1915 for a bit, I decided to fire Major Rick Rawlings back up with #56 Squadron in June of 1917. As luck would have it, he had a fine time trying to locate some excitement there as well! Tasked with destroying the railyard at Vimy Junction, the Major kept an eye on the various Albatros flights that would pass by overhead. Problem was, none of those scouts wanted to come down to play. Eventually, Rawlings got sick of their lack of interest and decided to press the point, eventually chasing some dots far enough across the sky that one of them peeled off of their formation and came over to fight.


Despite getting pretty close , you will be pleased to know, MudWasp that I refused to follow him down and left the battle inconclusive. By that time I was miles away from my flight and didn't even bother to file a claim...



So my question is, do many of you get just one or two enemy craft peeling off from their flight to attack you? Hellshade gets these massive furballs. Is it just disdain because they know how ineffectual I am?
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/01/15 03:44 AM

Not too often does that happen to me
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/06/15 06:34 PM

Aujourd'hui, notre jeune aviateur Patrole de Fronte trouves les ennemis nouveaux et dangereux pour le premier temps! Regardez:



Apres le bataille? Un enemi est finis et Patrole de Fronte vie pour l'autre jour!
Posted By: CatKnight

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/07/15 01:19 AM

Rick: Gesundheit. biggrin
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/07/15 04:57 AM

Merci! salute
Posted By: BKCason

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/16/15 01:17 AM

Originally Posted By: Rick_Rawlings
Well. Finally got a new SSD drive, everything loaded up, sussed out (thanks, OBD!) patched up (looks FANTASTIC!) and ready to go. So here is another in my line of completely successful attack runs against 2-seater formations that in no way involved any swear words at all! I even left the dead stick landing in for BKCason. (Yeah, it went that well...)


I just watched the video [only a month late smile ]. It looks like your player was in a Sopwith Pup? Nice landing at a handy airfield. I keep reading on the forum about mechanical failures and/or EA fire leaving someone in a bad way such that they take the first good landing spot to be found but I have not encountered that yet. It looks like you handled it well thumbsup My two campaigns are in early 1915 still [slow times for a slow learner]. One pilot is flying Morane Saulnier L 2-seaters and... knock on wood... hasn't had any mechanical issues yet. I saw my first NPC fatality today. My wingman on a bombing run dropped out shortly after takeoff and apparently crashed killing himself and the observer. I guess I better keep my wits about me during "routine" things like the climb out after takeoff [and other times].
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/16/15 02:59 AM

Stalling on take off and landing can be an issue, fortunately the Morane has a nice low stall speed. Of course then you have to worry about gliding off the runway and into a fence! dizzy Yes, lots to worry about!
Posted By: BKCason

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/16/15 01:58 PM

Originally Posted By: Rick_Rawlings
Stalling on take off and landing can be an issue, fortunately the Morane has a nice low stall speed. Of course then you have to worry about gliding off the runway and into a fence! dizzy Yes, lots to worry about!

Lots to worry about indeed. In Allen Burrel's last mission, he decided to taxi to to the hangers... oops... a little too fast and turned too late [rudder not as effective at slow ground speed] so his wing clipped the hanger. The O.C. was NOT happy with him. banghead
Posted By: BKCason

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/19/15 09:50 PM

Flight Sub-Lieutenant Alton Learner, on a reconnaissance mission flying from St-Pol-sur-Mer to the Front in the area of Loos, was killed while trying to make a dead-stick landing at Le Gorgue airfield.

While flying around 6500 feet above the lines near Neuve-Chapelle, his BE2c sustained a "system failure". Turning back from the front and trying for the nearest airfield while the engine gradually lost RPMs, he descended as quickly as seemed possible. Finally the engine stopped and Learner turned off the ignition, hoping to prevent a fire.

On the approach to Le Gorgue airfield, he had lost too much altitude and struck the trees just to the SW of the airfield which proved fatal both to him and his observer.

This was my first pilot loss. As I started this pilot, my first, as a "learning" experience in the RNAS in March of 1915, it is quite historical that a problem with his aircraft led to his demise. He flew a lot of QC missions in various aircraft to practice take-offs, landings and to learn the area around St-Pol-sur-Mer. Just after the Pfalz EIII was added to WOFF he actually had an encounter with one which his observer/gunner fired on. The EA was seen diving towards the ground smoking. It is somewhat ironical that the claim for this, my only EA encounter, was rejected as part of the process of closing out Learner's career in WOFF.

I suppose the lesson learned here is that I should have tried for safe looking field, pasture or road while I could rather than trying for that airfield. I only saw the red warning of the system failure under the TAC [I had the flight instructor turned on] out of the corner of my eye. I doubted what I had seen and continued for a few moments until I saw the RPMs dropping. I descended rather precipitously [perhaps too much so] trying to get down to a low altitude for landing at the airfield. Maybe I should have held onto as much altitude as possible until I was over the airfield and then spiraled down to a landing on the airfield or a nearby field.

C'est la guerre
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/20/15 05:36 AM

Keeping your altitude and spiraling down is an excellent choice. Two seaters can glide for miles from altitude. If there is any doubt, a road or rail line is a better bet than some of the cramped aerodromes with their devious fences and trees just waiting for the unsuspecting pilot! Condolences on your pilot loss. I am probably on my fifteenth or sixteenth Rick Rawlings... bottles
Posted By: MFair

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/20/15 03:43 PM

Originally Posted By: Rick_Rawlings
Keeping your altitude and spiraling down is an excellent choice. Two seaters can glide for miles from altitude. If there is any doubt, a road or rail line is a better bet than some of the cramped aerodromes with their devious fences and trees just waiting for the unsuspecting pilot! Condolences on your pilot loss. I am probably on my fifteenth or sixteenth Rick Rawlings... bottles


I will take a road over an aerodrome any day with a dead engine! thumbsup As you say, no room for error.
Posted By: BKCason

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/23/15 12:36 AM

2nd Lieutenant Allan Burrel, a young man from the small village of Furneaux Pelham in Hertfordshire, came near death again today. He had only 14 missions and about 16 hours of flight time since joining RFC-3 at Choques airfield.

As part of B-Flight he flew a reconnaissance mission to the front near Loos. Just as the flight approached the front at around 4300 feet his engine began to run very rough and was only able to turn around 700 RPM. He immediately turned back with the intent of returning to the airfield. But the engine seemed to run rougher and rougher, so he reluctantly cut off the engine and started to glide while looking for a safe place to land.

Unfortunately, there was a large number of forested areas where he finally ran out of altitude and was forced to choose a small field bordered by what he thought was a small road. As he rolled out after touching down, he found, much to his dismay, that what looked like a small road from the air was actually a fence!. The resulting collision destroyed his aircraft and put both pilot & observer in hospital for 7 days.

This is my second consecutive mission where there was a "system failure". I had no trouble recognizing it this time and a quick glance at the text under the TAC only confirmed what I already knew.

The first "system failure" led to my "QC" pilot being killed when hitting a tree on approach to landing when he ran out of altitude.

I sure hope the RNG treats me nicer when Allan gets out of hospital. wounded I like getting practice at all the things a pilot needs to know but multiple, consecutive system failures make for quite "Interesting times" indeed! I shall endeavor to persevere - Chief Dan George in Outlaw Josey Wales
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/23/15 12:54 AM

Originally Posted By: BKCason
2nd Lieutenant Allan Burrel, a young man from the small village of Furneaux Pelham in Hertfordshire, came near death again today. He had only 14 missions and about 16 hours of flight time since joining RFC-3 at Choques airfield.

As part of B-Flight he flew a reconnaissance mission to the front near Loos. Just as the flight approached the front at around 4300 feet his engine began to run very rough and was only able to turn around 700 RPM. He immediately turned back with the intent of returning to the airfield. But the engine seemed to run rougher and rougher, so he reluctantly cut off the engine and started to glide while looking for a safe place to land.

Unfortunately, there was a large number of forested areas where he finally ran out of altitude and was forced to choose a small field bordered by what he thought was a small road. As he rolled out after touching down, he found, much to his dismay, that what looked like a small road from the air was actually a fence!. The resulting collision destroyed his aircraft and put both pilot & observer in hospital for 7 days.

This is my second consecutive mission where there was a "system failure". I had no trouble recognizing it this time and a quick glance at the text under the TAC only confirmed what I already knew.

The first "system failure" led to my "QC" pilot being killed when hitting a tree on approach to landing when he ran out of altitude.

I sure hope the RNG treats me nicer when Allan gets out of hospital. wounded I like getting practice at all the things a pilot needs to know but multiple, consecutive system failures make for quite "Interesting times" indeed! I shall endeavor to persevere - Chief Dan George in Outlaw Josey Wales


Love that last line. Maybe it should be placed on the fuselage just under the rim of the cockpit!
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/23/15 07:18 PM

Esc LaF went on a front line patrol of the hilly area of Alsace. "A Flight" was flying lower than Adjutant Jacques "Jack" La Fontaine thought sensible so he lead "b Flight" above and behind them. Good thing he did so because once over the front lines two Fokker EIIIs emerged from a cloud and pounced upon the three men in "A-Flight", causing them to change course and run for their lives.

Jack dove as fast as he dared in his N10C-1 and soon hiis flight of five came to the rescue. Jack spooted his nemisis in a green Fokker and gave him hell.



Jack thinks he brained the pilot of the green Fokker, as he spiraled to the barren hills of the front right after this ss was taken.



Just as they were regrouping more Fokkers suddenly appeared at an equal altitude. Another DF broke out.



Jack hammered one in a crossing shot causing it's engine to smoke and then finished him off with what he thought was another pilot kill.



One pilot from "A-Flight" had to ditch, but all of Jack's men made it home to Luxeuil. He filed two claims, one was confirmed...the green Fokker pilot, Erwin Wenig, from Jasta 16.

Jack only has two claims confirmed and both are for his nemesis in the green Fokker EIII.
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/25/15 04:04 PM

Some action with the N11 in late May 1916 with the Esc LaF. Different pilot campaign.


Hey, I saw him first. Find your own Fokker!



Yikes, one found me! Where the heck is my squadmate now that I need him?


Took things low and was able to cut inside on him. Landed some hits.


He ran for a nearby airfield. Shot him down right over it. Planned on a rocket attack after he crashed onto the airfield, but the N11 took a few hits from ground fire. Decided not to press my luck with a hard setting on that.



Wound up landing at home with out firing a rocket.

That claim was confirmed for his first victory.


? I remember WOFF skipping the 31st of months...Not any more.


Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/12/15 07:41 PM

Got into a good fight with the huns. I had the N-17 with a mix of N-10,s someones else's kill but a nice flamer


image free hosting
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/12/15 07:48 PM

Lovely picture! yep
Posted By: OldHat

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/15/15 01:11 AM

No words, just a video on a balloon defense mission with an outcome pic from my German campaign pilot.



Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/15/15 05:17 PM

Sgt, Clive Seville ( American flying for France)
Esc 12, N-10,s
Flanders


Flying Dawn Patrol with 2 machines, I spotted and assaulted a Hun machine. My wing man and I circled making firing runs. I saw the Hun spin out of control but lost him in the clouds.

Ammo Rpt 1 drum of 47 rds 303 cal


free image uploading
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/15/15 06:00 PM

My experience with the N10 is limited to Esc LaF which gave me about two weeks of missions before upgrading to the N11. It's no hot rod, but I liked it's stability. Had decent guages and cockpit visibility for a Nupe too.
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/16/15 01:44 PM

Back in Alsace and having N17 fun with the LaF Esc in late September.
Erwin and Otto from Jasta 16 still come out to play every so often. winkngrin







Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/16/15 10:21 PM

Sgt, Clive Seville ( American flying for France)
Esc 12, N-10,s
Flanders


I went up solo and got lost. While behind Enemy Lines, I saw the Beast. The free floating Observation balloon was gigantic
My N-10 wouldn't go any higher and the German Sausage was 2,000 ft higher and going up ! I nosed over for home, knowing full well that no one will believe me.



adult photo sharing
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/17/15 12:43 AM

Nice!
I've never seen one except for home defence in England.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/17/15 01:42 AM

Dude, that's awesome!!! I've never seen one in a campaign. Do you remember the date by any chance? I wonder if they only fly on the historic date or if there is a chance to catch them any time in the right theatre during the right time frame...

MudWasp, those pictures are great, I really like the third from the bottom with the Eindecker fully illuminated against the background...
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/17/15 03:27 AM


wave
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/17/15 06:53 PM

Red sky at morning, Huns take warning.! Much color during Jack's recent Esc LaF mission. His arch enemy Erwin was out and about with his sidekick Otto who ran for home.











After dispensing with Erwin's green Fokker, Jack headed for the nearest enemy airfield and caught Otto high above it.






Just as Jack was heading away from the enemy airfield he spotted Aviatiks coming his way!








Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/17/15 09:30 PM

Hey Mudwasp, leave some for the rest of us will you!! biggrin
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/17/15 09:37 PM

Hahaha..Funny you said that as one of my guys, Masson methinks, just clipped me in the last mission as i was closing on a wounded and fleeing Fokker EIV. Fuel leak, minor wound, and finding a spot to dead stick it the N17 down.....post some pics tomorrow.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/19/15 03:38 AM

yep

Good show
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/19/15 04:10 AM

Sgt, Clive Seville ( American flying for France)
Esc 12, N-10,s
Flanders



We flew in 2 V formations of 3 Aero machines up and down on the enemy side of NML. The formation caught a little cannon fire but no damage. All six machines down safe.
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/19/15 04:51 AM

That dead stick landing was a little tricky.



Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/19/15 10:58 AM

MudWasp what is that fire in the second shot?
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/19/15 04:04 PM

I think it is from my wing tip or tail end scraping the ground.
I was traveling, bouncing downhill along the road and headed for trees, so I swung the Nupe into a 180.

That is the first I've seen of such a spark show, have seen small dust clouds.
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/19/15 06:34 PM


Originally Posted By: MudWasp


That is the first I've seen of such a spark show, have seen small dust clouds.


I agree. I have never seen that before.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/19/15 06:40 PM

wave


I think I know what MudWasp hit.




image search


yep
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/19/15 07:08 PM

rofl
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/20/15 04:09 AM

Sgt, Clive Seville ( American flying for France)
Esc 12, N-10,s
Flanders




Up 2 times today on Patrol and I never saw an enemy a/c. However, I was made Flight Lead of the Esc 5 a/c effort.


pic host


images
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/20/15 02:23 PM

I prefer to lead flights, but sometimes it seems that doing so causes all enemy planes to target me.
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/20/15 03:40 PM

Originally Posted By: MudWasp
I prefer to lead flights, but sometimes it seems that doing so causes all enemy planes to target me.


Just like the Hollywood westerns, take out the chief and all the Indians run away. biggrin
Posted By: MFair

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/20/15 06:12 PM

Originally Posted By: Robert_Wiggins
Originally Posted By: MudWasp
I prefer to lead flights, but sometimes it seems that doing so causes all enemy planes to target me.


Just like the Hollywood westerns, take out the chief and all the Indians run away. biggrin


It does not matter if I am the cheif or an indian, they all seem to target me!
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/20/15 06:27 PM

Originally Posted By: MFair
Originally Posted By: Robert_Wiggins
Originally Posted By: MudWasp
I prefer to lead flights, but sometimes it seems that doing so causes all enemy planes to target me.


Just like the Hollywood westerns, take out the chief and all the Indians run away. biggrin


It does not matter if I am the cheif or an indian, they all seem to target me!


Well then, I guess that's the price of being popular! biggrin
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/20/15 08:17 PM

Early October 1916 now for Jack and Esc LaF. He lead a flight of four N17s north towards the frontlines around St Die. Near the friendly airfield of Xaffervilles he spotted flak smoke and quickly spotted the source traveling head on at him. He fired off rounds into the nose of the Fokker quickly closing in on him. Almost had a collision with that pesky green Fokker.



Jack thought he had landed a round or two and that thought was confirmed when he was quickly able to get on the green Fokker's tail. He decided to let him test his dead stick skills, but his squadmates had other ideas in mind for that Fokker. Unfortunately they weren't all on the same page tactically and two of them crashed into each other in their haste to down the powerless wing warper.


As Jack shook his head in disgust he heard a Fokker engine below and behind him. He inverted, dove, and reversed direction to find the source of the sound. After a couple loops and half loops he was able to get his sight on the Fokker and eventually set him ablaze.


Posted By: OldHat

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/20/15 08:57 PM

The closest I've been to loosing a pilot since playing WOFF....

I was limping home and flying solo returning to base after being slightly injured (78% health) from attacking some Re8s. Just about to cross the line to safety, when.... crack, crack, thump, thump, thump, crack, oof, oof... heavy breathing (health @ 33%)....then a loud snap. I check to my left and notice my top wing is damaged and struts are gone. Luckily, I was only about 50 meters or so above ground. My plane veers sharply to the left and starts to nose dive while I try to keep her steady for a few seconds enough to land some what level. She lands dragging her left lower wing on the ground while I slam the rudder full right and try to counter her rocking from side to side to avoid flipping over. Finally, she stops fighting me and sits still.

My pilot gets captured and hospitalized, but manages to escape. Whew!




Posted By: OldHat

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/20/15 09:00 PM

Originally Posted By: MudWasp
After a couple loops and half loops he was able to get his sight on the Fokker and eventually set him ablaze.


MudWasp, you make it seem soooo easy..... I'm jealous.
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/21/15 12:48 AM

WOW! You're lucky you lived Oldhat!
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/21/15 05:34 PM

I finally shot down an enemy plane in my N28 campaign with the 94th Aero.
That Nupe is hard for me to get a handle on!

2nd Lt Robert Williams flew far right position in a transfer to the new airfield of Toul which is a short distance away from their current field of Vancoulers.


Flak bursts greeted them as they approached their new home. he waited for the formation to attack or investigate the target of the Flak, but his flight went straight into a landing pattern. Robert could identify four german two seaters about 1/2 a mile away and decided to press his luck and attack.


He got lucky and killed the DFW's engine. Then almost collided with it in an attempt to finish it off.




That was a close call that should have caused him to back off and watch the DFW crash or dead stick a landing. He chose otherwise and made another pass at the powerless DFW that was descending in a slow spiral. This time his timing was better and he dewinged the DFW.





Welcome to Toul 2nd Lt Robert Williams.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/21/15 06:53 PM

thumbsup Great going MudWasp.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/21/15 07:01 PM

Sgt, Clive Seville ( American flying for France)
Esc 12, N-10,s
Flanders



The Sqn put up 4 ships for Dawn Patrol . We ran into a flight of 3 Two Seat Recon types below and heading for Hunland. Lots of fun till I got pasted by a reargun and took Heavy damage and a lite Wnd.


photo uploading











Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/21/15 08:21 PM

Those Avaitik CI's have a unique field of fire that is different than rear seat gunners.
Be careful with them! yep
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/22/15 12:33 AM

Glad to see you folks having so much fun!
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/22/15 12:57 AM

Originally Posted By: MudWasp
Those Avaitik CI's have a unique field of fire that is different than rear seat gunners.
Be careful with them! yep



And they are not afraid to go "Bristol" on you and try to dogfight!
Dirty Huns.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/22/15 03:48 PM

reading


I Just luv the expression " Going Bristol " But what does it Mean ? popcorn
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/22/15 06:29 PM

Going "Bristol" as in the BrF2b Brisfit. IOW acting like a two-seat fighter.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/22/15 10:06 PM

yep


Cool
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/22/15 10:18 PM

Sgt, Clive Seville ( American flying for France)
Esc 12, N-10,s
Marne, France



On Patrol down by Riems with 2 a/c + 3 High Cover ( they never engaged too far back 1 or 2 NM ) when we almost ran into 2 2 Seat enemy machines. I had time to nose down and get of 19 rds fired then went pass. By the time, I turned around they and my wing-man was nowhere to be seen. I did the MudWasp as I landed and sure enough a small campfire appeared off my right wing damaging the machine. ( No campers duck ) After 2 hrs, the ADJ listed my wing-man as Missing.


upload photo
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/27/15 04:14 PM

Lt. Robert Williams, 94th Aero
Verdun, Toul airfield
N28C-1

The 94th has spent April focusing much attention on the nearby enemy airfield of Thiacourt and RR yards nearby. While on patrol Robert came up against a savy Pfalz pilot who tested all that Robert has learned about flying his odd French plane. The Pfalz would attack in an amazing charge from below to which Robert would counter with a quick change of direction, often involving a half loop, and then try to get his eye behind the sidewinding left slug guns of his Nieuport.




This routine repeated several times. Robert should have gunned down this Pfalz, but his aim was a bit off on that day. Finally he caught the "Ace of Hearts" Pfalz at an apex in one his attacks.




That seemed like a good couple of bursts. At first he didn't see much effect on the Pfalz. Then it's prop stopped and it burst into flames.


Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/27/15 06:12 PM

yep

Spot on.
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/27/15 09:34 PM

Really nice screen caps MudWasp!
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/28/15 08:45 PM

I hadn't flown the early Fokkers since before the 'Balance of Power' addon was released. Decided to start a new early Fokker campaign and see just how hard life is now, before I fly one of my existing early Fokker pilots and likely kill him off. It is MUCH Harder now and it wasn't easy before the N10C-1s either.

Otto Bergmann, Jasta 15
Habsheim field, Alsace
Fokker E-1
December 28th 1915

Beautiful morning for a patrol up to Colmar with a sliver of a cresent moon still hanging in the sky.
Otto is leading two HAs, Willy Glinkermann and Rudolf Weingartner.




South west of Colmar airfield and near a factory Otto spots unknown aircraft above and off his right wing.


The two unknowns quickly become known as N10C-1s as they change direction and dive on the three Fokker E-1s of Jasta 15. Otto performs as quick a change in direction as possible and meets them head on. Yikes that was close!




Otto takes on one Nupe while Willy and Rudolf square off against the other.






Otto might have clipped the top of a conifer with the tail of his Fokker just before climbing and sending a long burst into the Nupe.




The N10C-1 crashes into the forest not far from the factory.



Otto's Fokker is flying super sloppy now. Probably tail damage from the top of a tree. He makes for the factory and spots a road leading up to it just as he hears a Nupe engine above, make that more than one engine.... He made a difficult landing on the factory road. Right after he came to a stop a bullet hit his left wing and three N10C-1s flew past above the conifers lining the narrow dirt road.




He was lucky to have survived that mission. HAs Willy and Rudolf were shot down. Otto filed a claim and had it confirmed as a French HA named Celestin Sanglier.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/20/15 12:14 PM

Well MW are certainly seeing the war from 1915 to 1918.
I like the Pfalz victory.
Out of curiousity how long till you stopped shooting till he poofed into flames?
Posted By: maxpeck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/22/15 10:10 PM

Sorry - I am not as eloquent as others on this thread so this will just be a snapshot of my last few days of learning this awesome sim

An N16 diving onto me



Hellshade saved my life here
I had just watched a vid of him, he watched an enemy EA dive behind him and waited to see if it was going after him, I was impressed by his SA
When this fella dived I was waiting for him to turn toward me

When he did I broke away and it ruined his shot

Thanks Hellshade smile2

My wingman got him but it cost him his life



Made it to October 1916 looks frosty down there



My first proper victory





Unfortunately I have no shot of him going down

My first Balloon Bust where we actually made it to the target
Beautiful flying weather too smile2

Too close for comfort



I think I have upset someone



Unlucky - game over



I have managed 8 hours 10 Patrols and 3 victories
Absolutely loving the Alb D1 - feel super confident in it - always have the feeling it will get me home
I have a feeling this is what is going to be my downfall



Good hunting everyone
salute







Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/23/15 05:08 PM

thumbsup Looking Good maxpeck

2nd Lt. William 'Billy' Smith
94th Aero, Toul airfield in Verdun
N28C-1




A crappy day for flying included rain and high winds. Billy and Marr patrolled the frontlines just north of Toul and almost flew right into a flight of three Alb DVa.

Main guns set to less accurate and the rough bouncy weather made for some up close and personal dog fighting.



Posted By: maxpeck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/23/15 07:10 PM

Great stuff yourself MudWasp
I still haven't managed to shoot someone's wings off!

Bloody good show salute
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/24/15 06:04 PM

Billy was sent out alone to attack an enemy RR yard and destroy as much of the supplies in transit as possible. Just a short hop to the north of Toul. He ran into a lone Alb DVa on the way there, well almost right above RR yard.

Billy figured it was a an injured craft heading to Thiacourt, the closest enemy airfield. Nice earth tone paint job on the Hun's Albatros.


One Hun down and on the RR Yard goodies. Crates and barrels of fuel were his targets and set over a handful of them afire before taking a few hits from a machine gun and RTB.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/30/15 06:04 AM

Well, a completely new experience for me! A new experience with, as you will see, an outcome that I have had dozens of times...
I literally have not played my Rick Rawlings campaign in months, imagine my surprise when 56 squadron was transferred to England on home defense duty! I eagerly clicked on the "Advance To The Next Historical Event" button to be greeted with this:

Finally! A chance to see all those Gothas I bought months ago! Taking off, my flight angled for the intercept route hoping against hope to encounter them over dry land...

So, yeah, pretty much what happens every time I go up against someone with a rear gun... I must have made a good enough ditch, because I survived...


Overall, my flight had a pretty rough time of it:

Still, I did get credit:

With time for my hospital stay, we were back in Flanders upon my return, so that will probably be my only Gotha for the whole war!
darkcloud
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/30/15 02:38 PM

That was a nice surprise mission, Rick.

cheers to your Gotha GIV

Did you know that the rear gunner has the ability to shoot down through a cut out near the tail?
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/30/15 10:48 PM

Yeah, I thought a fast dive through would have me moving to fast for him to track well. I guess I could've pulled up over him, but then I guess they would've gutted the bottom of my plane. It wouldn't matter so much if I wasn't miles out over the ocean...
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/01/15 12:12 AM

I had my Gotha hit the water and I'd swear it created an oil slick.
Did you see anything like that?
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/01/15 01:25 AM

Unfortunately, I was no where near him when he went down, there's none around me though, as you can see. That would certainly be cool, though!
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/01/15 01:34 AM

I've been a Gotha pilot and been shot down. My advice on hitting them is an attack outside their V from slightly below. The rear gunner bottom shooting arc is narrow.

You're screwed if you hit the middle of the V.

A frontal attack from 2 or 10 O'clock and slightly below is the weak spot. winkngrin
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/01/15 02:38 AM

Nice, I'll probably never see one again but will remember the advice! salute
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/01/15 02:52 AM

Da same mostly holds true for all 2 sweater attacks even if they ain't got a cut out in da floor.

The Aviatik CI is the exception.
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/01/15 03:03 AM

Best advice I can give on taking down a hard two sweater bird is fly as the prey, the two sweater.

An Aviatik CI victory is a hard fought one.

Most of the time the mouse just lives to see another day.

But when the mouse becomes the Cat...that is golden... winkngrin
Posted By: maxpeck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/02/15 10:23 PM

Well - that didn't last very long

Decided to start in a Roland a few days before the Battle of the Somme Started
Had high hopes of surviving until the Alb DI was introduced

This is my first pilot where I have decided to turn the TAC off
It made the whole flight very exciting biggrin

How do they expect us to recon anything in this crap?



Without the TAC I am terrified of losing my flight
I stay as close as possible the whole time



Over the front I look up and am relieved to see that we have a couple of Eindekkers escorting us



That soon all goes to hell
A couple on Nupes attack us
They decide that as I am the new boy they both concentrate on me



During this the othet two Rolands continue to bravely run away
The two escorting Eindekkers do the same
At first I was really PO'ed about this
But I guess they were trying to accomplish the recon mission?
That's how I decided to RP it anyway

After taking many many hits I have to look for somewhere to put it down



Managed to stop just short of both the telegraph pole and the trees smile2



Didn't help me though - I died from my wounds before medical assistance could be administered

I am now thinking that instead of thinking long term - ie. start in a crap machine and work my way up, I should instead be thinking in terms of - pick a machine I like and just try to survive in it

I have said it before but I will say it again

WW1 aviation is Frikkin' deadly

As a PS
Very much enjoyed my first patrol with the TAC turned off
When I had it turned on, after a fight or evasion, I always knew I could just follow the line to get back to my flight
Without it now I am a lot more cagey - I get separation anxiety if I cannot see the rest of my guys for too long
Way more immersive - Loving it

Have dialled back the labels so that I get DOTS at 4000 (is that yards or meters - I suppose it doesn't really matter)
And until within 1000 I get no friendly or enemy info

It made the whole flight much more exciting
The whole time my head was on as swivel worrying about what was going on around me

I may have to buy a silk scarf to save my neck - WOFF is that good thumbsup



Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/02/15 11:44 PM

Well, the Roland CII is actually a pretty good 2 seater. I'd give it another run. Try to give your gunner reasonably good, stable lines of fire and you should do OK, of course, one on two vs. Nieuports isn't really fair. You really can't out-turn them, so try to turn like a snake, when you turn right, wait for them to turn right and then quickly go left. As they come around, wait until they are committed and go right again. This will hopefully shake them off your tail for a few secs and give your gunner a fair shot. I also skip a few days after every mission in my careers to simulate the boring, uneventful missions because when I'm flying, I like some action. That may help that DI show up a little sooner!
Good luck and report back with results!
Posted By: maxpeck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/02/15 11:54 PM

Originally Posted By: Rick_Rawlings
Try to give your gunner reasonably good, stable lines of fire and you should do OK, of course, one on two vs. Nieuports isn't really fair. You really can't out-turn them, so try to turn like a snake, when you turn right, wait for them to turn right and then quickly go left. As they come around, wait until they are committed and go right again. This will hopefully shake them off your tail for a few secs and give your gunner a fair shot


This seems very good advice
I think part of the problem was - having just come from an Alb DI - I was trying to fly it like a fighter
That's just not going to work rolleyes
May well give it another go tomorrow
Cheers Rick
Posted By: maxpeck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/03/15 01:04 AM

Upon reflection - I see where I went wrong

The two Nupes attacked me because I was the last in the formation - I panicked and dove away
The other two Rolands and also the two Eindekkers watched me dive away and thought - 'where the hell is that fella going?'

I should have stayed close to the two Rolands and my Eindekker escort for protection

In short - the enemy AI picked me off because I was an easy target

Again - good work WOFF
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/03/15 04:32 AM

That Roland can dive very well.

Don't be surprised if Fokker escorts flee for home at the first sight of enemy scouts. They know they are outclassed and try to save their own skin, sort of a live to run another day motto. I often felt like the Rolands were escorting the Fokkers... rofl
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/06/15 08:39 PM

Rupert Linderbrook
Jasta 17
Sep 1917, Flanders


Air field Defense:

5 Mix Albatross D-5 and D-III OAW.


Mixed it up with some 2 seat types good little shoot out.

2 Albatross Scouts damaged
1 Enemy 2 seat type shot down by wing men


image upload no compression


photo upload
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/07/15 04:36 PM

Rupert Linderbrook
Jasta 17
Sep 1917, Flanders


Squeeked by another air to air melee with N-24,s A flt of 5 attacked out of the sun good mixer from 9000 down to the deck kinda Blue Max among the trees.


upload pictures free
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/08/15 09:04 PM

Rupert Linderbrook
Jasta 17
Sep 1917, Flanders




Got into it with 1 flight Camels and 1 flight Strutters ( with Rear Gun) Guess what ?


upload photos
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/09/15 12:45 AM

I don't want to know! clapping
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/09/15 12:54 AM

You heard the rear gunner in the Strutter yell in agony as you filled him with bullets?
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/09/15 06:55 PM

Rupert Linderbrook
Jasta 17
Oct 1917, Flanders


Our a/c kette went for a Balloon this morning. 4 stayed high and I peeled off following Becker. He got the Balloon then as we rejoined the kette as 2 Camels swung through firing. A Mad House with twisting and turning. I couldn't get a shot at them. They turned that fast. then everyone was dispersed and we RTB in ones and two,s.


image hosting no register
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/09/15 08:07 PM

Carrick, Rupert was lucky they weren't behind him!
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/10/15 03:48 AM

yep


Thats the truth. They turn so fast I couldn't get a beed on them with my D-III OAW.
Posted By: Dark_Canuck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/26/15 11:39 AM

First off, Devs, thank you. This game is amazing.

A couple of notes: I have unlimited ammo on and gun jams off. My 3 year old likes to sit on my lap and fire the guns for me, so the guns are going pretty much constantly. (He also continually asks to shoot the red plane. I wonder what Manfred did to him in a past life, because it is definitly personal).


Flt Lt John K. Nuck
10 May 17
10 RNAS

I arrived at my sqn this morning weary and ready to settle in and meet the new guys. Before the engine on my Tripe had finished spinning the Major was out to introduce himself and inform me that I was going up on an intercept. Straight into the fire as it were.

Im not sure who my flight mates are, but Im sure they will help me out if I get into trouble.

We took off and headed South towards a bulge in the Front. The trip was uneventful, although one of the chaps dropped out and turned back. We were three as we crossed the lines into Hunland. We circled for some tim in clear skies, drinking in the scenery when the Germans sent up a balloon directly beneath us.

I was keen to introduce myself, being new to the show, so I dove down to give the Hun spotters a propper hello. The resulting explosion attracted the attention of a couple of Albatross who asked for a dance. I engaged, expecting my flight mates to give a hand. They were content to watch, however, so I was left one on two.

I got on the tail of one and sent some lead through his airframe. Of course his friend thought that was a poor show and he did the same to me. Fortunately, he was a poor shot; I will be more keen to check my tail next time. For some reason my attacker broke off and ran away, leaving me alone on the tail of an Albattoss. My first rounds must have damaged his controls because he was not moving around very well. I closed quickly remembering what my gunnery instructor said about getting close and aiming for the engine. Three bursts was all it took and he went in hard. One less foe to do the Kaiser's bidding!

I reformed with the flight and we headed back to the Aerodrome safely. I claimed the balloon and the Albatross and finally got to meet the other chaps in the Squadron. What an exciting morning!
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/26/15 11:59 AM

Originally Posted By: Dark_Canuck
First off, Devs, thank you. This game is amazing.

Yes, certainly is, DC, but mind you: it is NOT a game - you'll find out...

Originally Posted By: Dark_Canuck
I have unlimited ammo on and gun jams off. My 3 year old likes to sit on my lap and fire the guns for me,
so the guns are going pretty much constantly. (He also continually asks to shoot the red plane.
I wonder what Manfred did to him in a past life, because it is definitly personal).

Hahahaaaa!!! This is so cute -much better than the average combat reports usually are!
I almost spilled my coffee - I can really see him sitting there on your laps like in
a combat fighter airplane! Brilliant!
Posted By: lederhosen

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/26/15 01:40 PM

Ludenvoss seems to be doing well...for a bus driver that is.


This happened while taking off, of all things!



Posted By: Dark_Canuck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/27/15 02:37 PM

11 May 1917
Flt Lt John K. Nuck
10 RNAS

This morning it was an escort flight for two recce planes. I was flying Collishaw's wing. It was a lovely day for a Bosh hunt, if I do say so myself.

The flight was uneventful until a couple of Huns came out for a game of tag. I dont know if it was the beautiful weather or just general weariness, but neither side seemed particularly interested in shooting anybody down. Mostly, we just circled and scowled at each other until both us and the huns decided lunch was probably ready at the Aerodrome.

I landed quite without incident and made for the mess tent. It was there that the most interesting part of the day occurred.

I was enjoying a coffee with Ray Collishaw, Ellis Reid, Gerry Nash, Will Alexander and John Sharman. (it is never a good idea to leave this many Canadians alone together. Trouble always ensues) Anyways, Ray suggests we should all paint our Tripes black as a way of taunting the Huns. Could you imagine it? A bunch of black Tri-planes dancing through the skies like Death himself. Well, I thought it a capital idea and have bribed a rating to get the ball rolling. I've named her "Black Wolf" Hopefully, I can get someone to take a picture of it tomorrow when we go up!
Posted By: Dark_Canuck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/28/15 06:54 PM

13 May 1917
Flt Lt John K. Nuck
10 RNAS

The CO confirmed both my kills today! Im very excited and have added the kall markrs to Black Wolf. She is a fine looking plane, but I do wonder how the enemy will react when they see it in the sky.


Today they sent me up as flight leader, which definitely had me nervous. Most of these guys have tons of experience. We were to attack an observation baloon about 30 miles away. The flight there was without incident, but I was a little jumpy on the apporach and missed most of my shots wide. The boys behind me finished up the job, with William Alexander finishing it off.

The CO was right chipper that we got the job done with no losses.

Posted By: Dark_Canuck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/02/15 09:10 PM

Well, John K. Nuck is very very dead. Lost a wing at 8000 ft diving on an Albatross D.III, so he had a long time to think about his error.

I started a new pilot yeasterday and got a fair few missions in, so I will update soon.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/02/15 11:46 PM

That was pretty much my first experience with the Tripe as well. Better luck next time! salute
Posted By: Dark_Canuck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/03/15 01:58 AM

Originally Posted By: Rick_Rawlings
That was pretty much my first experience with the Tripe as well. Better luck next time! salute


The thing should still fly. It still had 4 other wings. A Camel has what, 2 at the best of times?
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/03/15 10:39 AM

Originally Posted By: Dark_Canuck
Lost a wing at 8000 ft diving on an Albatross D.III, so he had a long time to think about his error.

Mmuaha... - oops, sorry!
Now you know how my earlier learnings went and felt on the Albatros V-strutters -
it was a long way to "understand" the fragility of it's lower wings, and to learn to know
how far I can go. Good that we have more than just one lives, isn't it?

Did you use the blip switch? You should perform steep dives only with much reduced throttle,
or blipped (on planes without throttle).
Posted By: Dark_Canuck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/03/15 11:54 AM

No, I didnt blip, but I sure do now salute

I cant even imagine how anyone survived the flying war. There are so many lessons to learn and luck required to get through the first day! And I have been flying sims since the days of Chick Yeager and the first Red Baron. Huge Kudos to the Dev team for creating this.
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/03/15 12:14 PM

Originally Posted By: Dark_Canuck
I cant even imagine how anyone survived the flying war. There are so many lessons to learn...

There surely are, DC!
I think a major difference between them and us simmers was simply this:
They did not do the more daring things easily. They performed a very steep and fast dive when they needed
to escape the guns of a chaser - but not easily just to dive on a possible target.
In short: their feeling of their own true vulnerability often prevented them from being daring at all.
No sim can simulate the REAL threat of loosing a leg, an eye, or even your life.

Originally Posted By: Dark_Canuck
...and luck required to get through the first day!

Yep, and luck. I sometimes wonder, how many more Foncks, von Richthofens and Mannocks would be known -
had they not had less good luck, and therefor fallen earlier.

Originally Posted By: Dark_Canuck
Huge Kudos to the Dev team for creating this.

Same from here! thumbsup
Posted By: Dark_Canuck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/03/15 12:32 PM

Why they let me keep my rank of Captain is beyond me. Im not wholly comfortable with this whole business of flying and leading these poor sods into combat is so different from the trenches.

The chaps at RFC headquarters sent me to No. 46 Sqn on 1 Nov 17. We were all flying Pups (wonderful little aircraft), and had a full compliment of 15 pilots. The first week went well enough. I led several patrols over the front and even earned two confirmed victories. The lads were in high spirits and I thought that maybe we had the hang of this whole war.

It all changed when Sgt McHard's engine caught fire. From the moment of his death, our squadron has been cursed. Every time a flight takes off we lose somebody. By the time I scored my third and fourth victories, we were down to eight pilots.

Today the CO sent all eight of us up to attack a rail yard just east of Vimy. Myself and 2Lt Thompson had the only Camels, the rest of the boys using Pups. The flight started well enough and we reached the target without incident. It seemed we were the only aircraft in the sky. We broke of for our attack run and came in firing everything we had.

Just as we reached treetop level, six Albatross dove out of the clouds. It was a massacre. Four of my boys bought it before we could even react. Within a few minutes, three Pfalz joined the fracas and two more of our boys were down. 2Lt Thompson and myself fought a withdrawl and managed to make it back to our lines. I had to land in a field just behind our trenches.



The CO says it will be a few days before any replacement make it to us. What a disaster.
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/03/15 12:47 PM

Have you ever read "No Parachute", Dark_Canuck?
During the "Cambrai Offensive", Camel-flyer and author Arthur Gould Lee got shot down/was forced to land
twice on one day. He almost cursed the brass for letting the Camel fly gound attacks,
and he lost a friend in the first mission.
In the thickest fog, they flew to drop their bombload.
Lee could only just evade a factory chimney that suddenly appeared in front of him.
His friend was found, when the mist cleared up.
He had run into a tree and died.
Posted By: Dark_Canuck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/03/15 12:51 PM

Originally Posted By: Olham
Have you ever read "No Parachute", Dark_Canuck?
During the "Cambrai Offensive", Camel-flyer and author Arthur Gould Lee got shot down/was forced to land
twice on one day. He almost cursed the brass for letting the Camel fly gound attacks,
and he lost a friend in the first mission.
In the thickest fog, they flew to drop their bombload.
Lee could only just evade a factory chimney that suddenly appeared in front of him.
His friend was found, when the mist cleared up.
He had run into a tree and died.


I havent read that one. I will add it to my list. Im almost done Air Command by Raymond Collishaw and I need something to follow that up.
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/03/15 03:04 PM

"No Parachute" is my top read from all WW1 pilots. "Heavily recommended!"
Posted By: Dark_Canuck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/04/15 12:50 PM

17 Nov 1917
Capt DC
46 Sqn

Im fairly certain the CO both blames me for the loss of most of our Sqn and also wants me dead. Today he sent Thomson and me to attack a bloody airfield. Just the two of us.


As we approached the airfield we ran into six Alb Dv's just beginning their landing pattern. Needless to say, six on two were not good odds, but feeling reckless and beligerent after the loss of so many good men, I dove into the thick of them.

I will be in the hospital until the 29th, they tell me.
Posted By: Dark_Canuck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/04/15 01:28 PM

29 Nov 1917
Capt DC
46 Sqn

Finally, the curse had been broken. Thomson and I, along with one of our two new pilots Shelley (we have four now, Yahoo!) Flew a balloon bust today.

As we approached the target area I noticed two balloons in the vacinity. The sky was clear of enemy, so I sent Thomson and Shelley to hit one while I took the other.

I quickly had success against my balloon and went to assist the others. Their balloon still existed, as they seemed to be rather distracted by a Pfalz D.III who was attacking them.

I got on the tail of the Pfalz and put several rounds into his machine, driving him off and saving Shelley from a premature demise.

The other two had sustained damage and headed for Filescamp, so I finished off the balloon and escorted them home.

Thomson has taken to calling me Pope, as my plane always returns to Filescamp quite "holey"

The mechanics have a different nickname for me...
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/04/15 09:34 PM

Cpt Sweat Pants
some where in France



Holy Smoke the Burn rates are great.


screencast


imgurl
Posted By: Dark_Canuck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/07/15 02:00 PM

Capt DC
No 46 Sqn RFC

December started off slow enough. Between the first and the 9th nothing of interest happened. The 9th, however, kicked off a 3 day ordeal with a balloon that really stirred the drink.

The morning of the 9th saw some new boys transferred in. One, 2Lt Chris Bliss I grabbed as my wingmate and we set off for a balloon bust just across the line.

Lt MacLaren joined us as our third and we reached the balloon without trouble. I popped the hun gas bag but received several new holes in my airframe for my trouble.

We returned safely and I filed my claim. We found out that the major was being transferred back to London! I was absolutely braced. We had a real smash up in the mess that night. The new chaps wished him well, but Thomson and I were more than happy to see him go. Our biggest question was who was going to come in to replace him.

We got our answer early the next morning. Fighting the effects of a fantastic hangover, I stumbled out to breakfast. While doing my best to get and keep down coffee and eggs, the duty corporal came over and gave me a message: General Trenchard was on his way. Blast it.

I had the Corporal wake up the men and formed them up to the best of their ability. It looked like someone had dug up the cemetery and stood up the dead on parade.

Trenchard had his driver stop in front of me and exited his vehicle, looking as displeased as ever. His eyes finally met mine and he walked over slowly.

I saluted as smartly as possible given the circumstances and said "Captain Canuck, Sir. Acting CO Number 46 Squadron, Sir."

His frown broke slowly into a grin and he asked if we had enjoyed last night.

He didnt wait for an answer before continuing on. "The reason I am here Captain, is to introduce the new CO of 46 Sqn. As this Sqn has suffered over 100% casualties in less than 6 weeks, I wanted to do it personally. Congratulations Major Canuck. Oh, also, your last three claims have all been approved. I believe that makes 8 now? Congratulations on becoming an ace, Major."

With that, he dismissed the parade and turned to his vehicle. "One more this Major," he said over his shoulder, "That balloon is back up again. Go get it for me, would you?"

........

That afternoon I took Bliss and MacLaren with me again to deal with this balloon. Once again we reached it without incident and I popped it. As we were coming around, a lone Pfalz DIII came investigating. All three of us put rounds into him, though none of us could figure out who finally got him. All returned safely.

Much to my fury, when we got back HQ rang up to say the huns had already replaced the balloon and it was imperitive we go and get it the next morning.

So we did. This time I wanted to make sure the guns got the message, I came in at treetop level and strafed the living daylights out of the ground pounders, using rockets on their truck. Bliss took care of the balloon. The gunners on the ground were good and put several holes in my plane, a few into important components. I barely made it back to Filescamp, and came too close to a crash landing, but the mechanics ensured my machine would be ready for tomorrow.

It looks like we will have lots to celebrate in the mess tonight!
Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/07/15 03:21 PM

Captain Sweat Pants ...?? ?... !!!
Love that seldom seen character from Big Bang Theory.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/07/15 11:37 PM

reading


He has a catchy name hun ?
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/07/15 11:58 PM

Cpt Sweat Pants

Some where in France



free photo hosting
Posted By: Dark_Canuck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/08/15 08:20 PM

I both love and hate how this sim will punish you for the slightest mistake. As my wife will tell you, I make a lot of 'em!

Capt DC died being an idiot. Willfully engaged a flight of DVs who had a numbers and hight advantage. I was doing fine until I got greedy and ended up colliding with one.

I think it is time to move away from the Camel and onto a plane that doesn't actively try to kill me just trying to manuever it. I hear 56 Sqn could use a new pilot smile
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/08/15 11:52 PM

Greed is one of the seven deadly sins, isn't it? RTFM

Another HUGE mistake is the idea, you could win the war single-handedly. laser

But WOFF also has a BIG comfort for you: you will not be dead from all your mistakes.
At least no longer than you need to re-enlist another unabashed fighter pilot! pilot

(I have long lost count of all my heroes, who made the same, or similar mistakes...)

angel angel angel angel angel angel angel
Posted By: Dark_Canuck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/09/15 12:44 AM

Indeed it is one of the deadliest sins I'd say!

Also, thanks for recommending "No Parachute." Im most of the way through it already (just read about the Cambrai fiasco today). What a fantastic book. I cant imagine the fortitude his wife had to deal with the stress of war through letters.
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/09/15 12:50 AM

Yeah, she must have been a strong girl! But maybe better than to hear nothing for weeks?

Cecil Lewis wrote a bit about his mum, and how she tried to hide her fears from this young,
dashing and daring son of hers - I cannot find the quote right now, but it brought tears
into my eyes - another top read: "Sagittarius rising".

Arthur Gould Lee also wrote "Open Cockpit", which is said to be great, but I haven't read it myself yet.
Posted By: Dark_Canuck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/09/15 12:53 AM

Ive got Winged Victory by Yeats on hold at the library. I hear it's a solid work of fiction. Ive heard good things about Sagittarius Rising. Ill have to give it a try as well.
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/09/15 01:01 AM

Are you a great reader?
The winter can be long - here are more interesting reads:
- Ernst Udet: "Ace of the Iron Cross" (English translation)
- James McCudden: "Flying Fury"
- Otto Fuchs: "Flying Fox" (English translation)
Posted By: Dark_Canuck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/09/15 01:25 AM

Honestly, I haven't read much in the last decade, but I am currently on paternity leave from work (we had a second boy in June). He likes to sleep on me during the day, which gives me ample time to read and it beats surfing the internet all day.
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/09/15 09:28 AM

Originally Posted By: Dark_Canuck
He likes to sleep on me during the day...

Gee, how cute is that?! I saw the picture of you two immediately - an image of true peace!
Guess I envy you, D_C!

Originally Posted By: Dark_Canuck
...which gives me ample time to read and it beats surfing the internet all day.

Yeah, I find the same - reading can be so rewarding, and it makes me positively tired
after a while, so I sleep better.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/13/15 05:40 PM

The Baron
Diesel Oil
Somewhere over france.


I caught an Englander for breakfast on our-side of the lines. Made two passes and he was toast.



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Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/23/15 12:57 AM

Cpt Sweat Pants

Over the Lines



Englander Kaput.


forum image hosting
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/23/15 12:19 PM

Carrick, the devastator! Mmuahahahahaaa!!!
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/24/15 01:45 AM

Yikes! Patrole de Fronte's first mission in a Nieuport 16 was almost his last! After a nice Railyard Attack, his engine started making funny noises over a big bunch of fence-ridden fields. He needed to get that bad-boy down fast! Well, the N16 did its usual and his newly painted "Chant du Canari"-liveried one was totaled and he was about bonkers! He came back from a month's much needed R&R to find everyone else had graduated to N17s but him and his Ailier! So he's stuck in a crappy leftover N16 when then two of them run into a tenacious Roland CII. Olham, those two-seater boys are good!

At the end of the first part of the video, he was All Shook Up!
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/24/15 03:41 AM

yep

The Albatross D-I is a sweet ride.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/24/15 07:50 PM

The Baron
Diesel Oil

Somewhere over France.


img hosting



adult image
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/26/15 04:30 AM

The Baron
Diesel Oil

Over Flanders Fields

Feeding the Kette:


upload png
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 12/14/15 06:36 PM

LT Sweat pants flying with Oswald Boelcke

Somewhere over France.



upload jpg
Posted By: Stache

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 12/24/15 04:59 PM

Well I doubt I will ever be the wordsmith like some of you gents that frequent these forums.
Any reports I do will most likely not be as entertaining as a lot of the posts I have read here.
Maybe with many more years of WOFF flying...

Anyway, this is an excerpt of a note I sent a friend of mine.
He got us both going in ROF a couple years ago - but we both quickly lost interest.
I have been trying to get him going in WOFF.

I showed him my cockpit I have been working on the past few months and had him try out WOFF in QC.
He was impressed, still trying to get him back to try a campaign mission or two.
However he has started his own cockpit now and seems eager to finish it.
Hopefully, he will complete it early next year and join the WOFF family.

=============================================================

Dieter, my first German pilot, flying the Halberstadt for 11 missions finally got a DII.
I started in in March of 1917 - to get a bit of experience before Bloody April.
Wow, you can really appreciate the DII after having to fly a Halberstadt.

Unfortunately Dieter got a bit too aggressive in his second ride in the DII and got killed by a rear gunner.
Was not the first time a rear gunner got me, seemed like they were a bit too accurate – so I turned that down a notch.

Learned that flying for the Germans in March / April 1917 is not at all like flying for the British in summer of 1916.
You want action – you got it – every mission.
And the German fighters, least my Jasta so far, do not fly far from base maybe 20-30 miles at most.

Created new Pilot Bernd Bohme
Started him late March, when I knew the Jastas would be getting Albs, so I would not have to fly that darn Halberstadt again.
Ohh, and the weather sucks in Spring 1917 – Seems to be raining or heavily overcast every day.
Bernd first mission was great. Got confirms on TWO Strutters in a single mission, one a flame.

Second Mission – Escort.
We meet planes and complete escort – Bernd kind of strays away from formation.
Flight starts heading for home – Bernd gets jumped on by a Spad VII – He shoots Bernd up and does some engine damage.
The rest of the flight apparently did not see anything – they all just kept heading home.
Bernd manages to dive away and keep his plane in the air long enough to get to home air base.

Third Mission – Patrol behind our lines.
Well this the flight did not see anything – again weather was horrid.
Ended up do a return to base much quicker that I thought we should.
Flying – arrive over our base – Start circling to come down from 10000 feet.
One of the other planes in our flight turns to start his landing and runs into Bernd.
That’s all she wrote – straight down from 10K feet.

This would have been the time to use the restore pilot mod – if I had installed it.
Oh well, lesson learned..

Time for Carsten Crossmann, going to start him, same Jasta 3, same time end of march 1917.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 12/24/15 08:01 PM

wave

Straight down from 10000 ft ? What a Splat! Good luck on the next pilot winkngrin
Posted By: Stache

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 01/02/16 05:41 PM


Feldwebel Carsten Crossmann, Jasta 3, Flanders

I hear this is being called “Bloody April”, not sure who’s blood is being refereed to, ours or theirs. It’s April 27th, I’ve only been here a month now. Recently it seems we are constantly outnumbered in the skies. We used to take off with two flights of six to seven planes each. This afternoon it was me and Schlenker alone. It was strange seeing only a single plane to the left of me and none to the right. Half of the other pilots in our squadron are either dead or in the hospital. I just got back after spending five days in the hospital myself.

Mission today calls for balloon defense, weather is clear with blue skies and clouds on the horizons, nowhere to hide today. Off we go to start our patrol, as we climb and get to altitude, the sky is empty. I am thinking maybe we will get lucky today and not run into the enemy. The patrol continues uneventful, I have a hard time keeping up with Schlenker in my DII. His DIII (early) is just a bit faster, I find I have to keep turning on his inside or he will quickly be out of sight. Certainly do not want to be alone out here.

Nearing the end of our patrol, I am thinking ahh, will be heading home soon, then off in the distance some dots appear. Schlenker starts heading for them and I follow. They are a pair of N23 and a pair of Strutter 1B1’s. The N23’s are a bit closer and we go after them, hoping the Strutters will just continue on home. Such is not the case and it is soon four against two. I find myself separated from Schlenker, weaving and dancing, I occasionally spot him off keeping one N23 busy. I have both an N23 and Strutter paying me attention, the fourth enemy decided to head for home.

Going around in circles for what seemed forever, I never really get a clean shot at them but they only manage a few holes in my plane. Eventually they both decided to go home. After breathing a sigh of relief, I look for Schlenker and see he is still occupied with an N23. As I turn to help out, the N23 breaks off and heads for home. For a short second I think of pursuing, but see Schlenker has already turned to the East. I follow, maybe tomorrow we will be able to put up more planes.

I keep hoping I will soon get a DIII assigned.

Posted By: lederhosen

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 01/12/16 10:34 PM

Who-ha, now that was a mission. DOP early 1916, 17 km over Hunland

sry for the mass of pics








Posted By: lederhosen

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 01/12/16 10:35 PM




Posted By: MudWasp

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 01/13/16 03:39 AM

thumbsup
Posted By: Dark_Canuck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 02/25/16 11:30 AM

Well, It's been a few months since I have had any flight time due to a serious medical issue with my son, that is fortunately no longer an issue. I fired up WOFF amd promptly went through three pilots in less than an hour. Glad to see I didn't lose any skills :S
Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 02/25/16 11:49 AM

Mmuahahahahaaa!!!
Good to hear that the issue is overcome, Dark_Canuck!
Check WOFF website for the latest patches!
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 02/27/16 05:47 AM

wave

Another surprise in WOFF V2 I was flying my Pilot in Jasta 10 when a Fire broke out. To my complete surprise, I was able to make a rough landing and Survive! Albeit, my pilot was at 73 Health and will be out for 9 days. I have never had a pilot make it thru one of those unexplained Fires. This game just gets better !
Posted By: Dark_Canuck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/02/16 12:27 AM

Had quite an experince today in my 46 Sqn Campaign. My flight met up with a flight of six DVa over the lines in the middle of a driving rainstorm.

Everyone picked a partner and began the usual dance. We quickly lost sight of everyone in the clouds and I found myself alone with a DVa pilot who was clearly better than me. He had me on the defensive for a good 10 minutes putting numerous holes in my poor Pup, yet miraculously not hitting me or anything vital. I finally dove through some fortuitously located clouds and gained some separation.

I thought I had lost him and began to relax, heading back to the airfield. Of course, as soon as I let my guard down: Daka daka daka, more holes to patch. I put the Pup in as steep a dive as I dared and prayed the lads on the ground were paying attention.

Fortunately, they did not fill me full of lead and the DVa broke off for his side of the lines. It was a rough day at the office but I can still head to the mess for a pint!
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/04/16 10:53 PM

If you are playing a 46 campaign I will guess you have read the book "No Parachute"?
Posted By: Dark_Canuck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/05/16 11:32 AM

Indeed I have. Olham recommended it to me on the last page actually. It was a great read biggrin
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/16/16 12:45 AM

Some where over France.

3 Spad VII,s mix it up with 6 DFW.s Results: 1 Spad Shot down in flames + 2 Damage. The flight didnt get Squat !


picture share


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Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/20/16 07:25 PM

Some where in the Marne Sector
1917, Airfield Attack by Spads


upload pictures online
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/20/16 08:08 PM

Nice work, which pilot is this?
Posted By: Aidan

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/22/16 09:31 PM

10/10/1916 - Jasta 6 - Flanders

From the diary of Roland von Fünfkirchen:

After yesterday, which ended in a catastrophe for the Staffel, I had mixed feelings about this one.
I was a bit worried, if I might end up crashlanding again. But what if this time, I can't make it back to our lines? Yesterday I only got lucky with it.
I tried to get rid of these thoughts, as we prepared ourselves for today's first patrol. The sky was clean and the autumn air wasn't colder than it was supposed to be either. According to the plan, I was in Schwarm 2 and we were supposed to patrol the front lines, while Schwarm 1 will assist us. Getting into the cockpit, I quickly checked if everything is working. All looked good to take off. The moment, everyone was ready, the engines started. I love the sound of the Albatross, it kind of calms me down. Firedrich and Ernst took off without any problems, so it was my turn. It went well, no problems, everything was still working.
We flew a round above the airfield to form up, than, we hit the direction of our patrol-route and started climbing. The clouds were quite low, so we decided to fly above them. The skies seemed to be empty. We didn't see any movement, except for a squad of some Roland CII.s and their escort of Halberstedts, from a nearby airfield. Schwarm 1 was far faster, than us and they went ahead for some reason. After a few minutes, we saw them flying towards us. I tried to look at Friedrich on my right, but he was at the end of his wits, just like me. Same for Ludwig on our back. Ernst our flight leader sloved down a bit, so we could catch up with him. Schwarm 1, flew by above us and we spotted two enemy aircraft chasing them. They were quite far yet. Ernst waved at Friedrich and me to attack the enemy, while, he and Ludwig turned back and started flying home.
And then it hit me. I used to be quite a brave man in the trenches, but now I felt fear. It's only Friedrich and me against two Nieuport 17s and our Albatrosses. I spat out of the cockpit and started following Friedrich. He is our ace. Nothing can go wrong, if he is here with me. I was wrong. As I closed in on one of the Nieuports, I lost both Frierdich and the other enemy. The frenchman flew towards me, than turned. I tried to chase him, when I found the other one... or some of his bullets at least. The #%&*$# ended up behind me somehow. I stopped chasing the other one and tried to shake this clown off. He was good. Seemed to be better than me at least. He kept staying behind me, so all I could do is to try to avoid giving him a clean position to shoot. My plane still took some holes, but thankfully nothing serious. I took a steep dive, hoping, he will follow me and so he did. Shortly, before I hit the ground, I pulled the plane up while the frenchmen set his plan straight. This gave me the opportunity, I wanted. I was behind him and I didn't intend to let him go. I heard some shots from afar, which meant Friedrich and the other Nieuport are still fighting. I shot a few rounds towards the french and I hit. He tried the same moves, I did, to avoid hits, with lets success, so I could land a few other hits and he actually became slower! I was about less than a hundred meters behind him, when suddenly something crossed my path: the burning wreck of a Nieuport. It almost hit me! I closed on on the french from behind and shot another rounds. Suddenly his plane turned sharply to the left and fell to the ground in front ouf our observation balloon. I couldn't even believe, I won! As I looked around, I found Friedrich. He just landed his plane next to the same balloon. I saw him getting out of his plan, so I waved at him and started heading home. They will bring him back soon anyways.
When I reached our airfield, I realized, I was quite quick on the way back, as Ernst and Ludwig were about to land. I reported, I shot down a Nieuport 17 and Friedrich another one, but he will only arrive later as he was forced to land his plane. Thankfully, right next to one of our balloon-crew. Before the evening, Friedrich returned and confirmed my kill, while the balloon-crew did the same in their report.
I officially scored my first kill, after 6 days of service. It is a great feeling. I hope there is more to come. Tonight, we are going to celebrate a bit and tomorrow, we are ready to hit the skies again and hopefully we return in one piece again, but there is always the chance, that the french get the better of us next time.


Graf Roland von Fünfkirchen
10/10/1916
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/23/16 03:21 AM

wave

Mr Rawlings: Its my Non-DiD pilot using DiD rules. ( ? ) Anyway, Its a standby for when my DiD pilot is in the Hospital or whatever. I use it to practice taking Pics during fights and limit Patrols to 3 a/c or less. thumbsup In this manner , I get my daily Fix of WOFF.
Posted By: lederhosen

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/23/16 06:55 AM

I too can't fly anymore without using DID. I have one pilot named "Fill in Pilot" for when I cant fly using the DID rules...wounded, grounded etc. I've tried flying around just to actually see different aircraft types, but a career without DID rules is just toooo boaring for me.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/31/16 08:24 PM

Somewhere over the Marne in France
1917.

3 Spads mix it up with 5 Albatross D-III,s


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Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/12/16 04:14 PM

Somewhere over France
1917.


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Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/21/16 04:08 PM

Combat Patrol in a D-III


Posted By: Jammer28

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/20/16 04:59 PM

Originally Posted By: carrick58
Somewhere over the Marne in France
1917.

3 Spads mix it up with 5 Albatross D-III,s


picture upload sites


upload picture


image upload no limit

Fantastic shots Carrick! I particularly like the third one.
Posted By: Jammer28

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/20/16 05:02 PM

Six of us started off on a patrol over a friendly aerodrome. After forming up Lt. Fred Peirce peeled off and headed back home. Half way through our sortie another machine leaves formation and then another as we start back. No encounters during the flight. When I land I find out the fate of Peirce. It appears his his engine burned out but he managed to crash land before dying. Nice chap, twenty three years old. The other fellows landed ok. I know our mechanics are doing the best they can but this needs to be looked into. Until today I haven't been too concerned about our machines reliability. Now I have something else to worry me.


Posted By: Olham

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/20/16 05:06 PM

Geeze - spooky!
Posted By: lederhosen

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/20/16 05:59 PM

creepy...but cool at the same time
Posted By: CaptSopwith

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/28/16 01:33 AM

Enjoying a new campaign with the legendary RFC 56 Squadron. Fresh from England and equipped with the brand new SE5. My second mission was an intercept assignment and we certainly found the enemy. Almost a dozen German Albatros fighters and two-seaters prowling near the front. My pilot (hopefully) accounted for one Albatros! We'll see if HQ actually approves his victory.


Posted By: 77_Scout

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/01/16 07:31 PM

This young fellow has been in action for over 2 months pushing a docile Aviatik two-seater around the western front. After 57 hours of flying he's only had two brief brushes with the enemy; the skies aren't very active in December 1915.

(Side note: This probably sounds as boring as heck to most people, but I am having fun trying to become an early German ace following a semi-historical path and working my way up from the very bottom. I'm nuts, and freely admit it.)

Now something exciting is starting to happen; Hans has just been assigned a well-used Eindecker E1 to fly and a new fellow named Boelke has just joined the squad. In a ploddingly realistic career such as this, for me this counts as big news.



Gawd, I hope I don't kill him on my first time up in the Eindecker.
Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/01/16 08:00 PM

77_Scout, you should join us in the Centenary DID. We are now in June of '16 but we all started back in June of '15. My British pilot just completed his first year of war flying and I know what you mean about it being plodding sometimes, but it is satisfying at the same time.
Posted By: 77_Scout

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/02/16 10:51 PM

Originally Posted By: Banjoman
77_Scout, you should join us in the Centenary DID. We are now in June of '16 but we all started back in June of '15. My British pilot just completed his first year of war flying and I know what you mean about it being plodding sometimes, but it is satisfying at the same time.


Thanks Banjoman. I was in Olham's DID challenge last year and had fun. I'll have a look at the Centenary DID to see what it is all about.

Some time in the future, I'd really like to get into a 'full real' challenge, where everyone tries to survive using no aids of any kind ('clean' screen, cockpit view only).
Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/03/16 02:03 AM

77_scout, that's how I'm flying the Centenary DID and for that matter Olham's DID.
Posted By: MFair

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/03/16 03:07 PM

Originally Posted By: 77_Scout
Originally Posted By: Banjoman
77_Scout, you should join us in the Centenary DID. We are now in June of '16 but we all started back in June of '15. My British pilot just completed his first year of war flying and I know what you mean about it being plodding sometimes, but it is satisfying at the same time.


Thanks Banjoman. I was in Olham's DID challenge last year and had fun. I'll have a look at the Centenary DID to see what it is all about.

Some time in the future, I'd really like to get into a 'full real' challenge, where everyone tries to survive using no aids of any kind ('clean' screen, cockpit view only).


Scout, up to my "Q" pilot in the DID now flying full real and its all your fault! Never had so much fun. And thank you again for dragging me to the dark side.
Posted By: zifnow

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/28/16 03:10 PM

My first try:

April 1916
RFC 24th
Mission assigned: Patrol deep in enemy territory. Target, enemy airfield east of Bapaume.

A Flight: cover
B Flight: Ltn.Hawker - sLtn. Bellerue (me) - Ltn.Andrews - Ltn.Thinders

About 8:30am, close to the objective at 9000feet, Ltn.Hawker initiated a moderated dive. Followed about 150feet behind, after a while I spotted a white Aviatik two-seater, about 6000 feet.

Short after, spotted a flight of 6 ea, north of us, 1000feet above; 3 of them dived on us. Ltn.Hawker engaged the two-seater.

I keep following Hawker, while Andrews and Thinders engaged the three diving ea. Hawker fired few rounds on the Aviatik and zoomed away. I entered and fired few rounds from about 20m, and zoomed too. The observer fire was accurate, but I received apparently no hit.

Lost sight of Hawker and the Aviatik, I turned west to join Andrews and Thinders which were engaged with 3 Fokker monoplanes. Andrews chased a Fokker and put several bursts into it. I closed up and fired a long strafe to the same ea from distance. Andrews fired again, and the Fokker start diving, then burst into flames.

Suddendly bullets were hitting me, I made an evasive maneuver and spotted the white Aviatik passing under my plane, which observer was firing at me. Another Fokker closed the distance, so I turned west to the front and disengaged by speed.

Flaks were being fired so I guessed my squadron mates were heading the same direction away. The Fokker ceased the pursue after a minute. Looking behind I have seen the white Aviatik forced to land some hundred meters away from the aerodrome, and a DH2, probably Hawker, above it.

I reached Andrews about 5000feet above enemy lines, and togheter we returned to the base.

Witnessed: Andrews shooting down a Fokker monoplane in flame - Hawker forced to land an Aviatik two-seater.

No losses.


Ps: during the after landing mission briefing, it turned out that A flight engaged the 3 Fokker monoplane which didn't dived on us and shoot down one. Nice mission, really.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/24/16 04:51 AM

Some where over France.


Posted By: lederhosen

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/04/16 09:08 AM

Posted By: Polovski

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/12/16 12:57 PM

Great pic Lederhosen,

It seems to be quiet in this thread - probably most are posting them in the DiD Centenary Challenge forum instead.

It may be time to unstick this one.

Posted By: lederhosen

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/23/16 02:38 PM

Gents .... I'm having my "coming out"






Found her while googling. Seems she was quite a person, too bad there is so little known about her.
And yes, although not being allowed to join the air force she did have a pilots licence (1 of 3 women).
She did make it to the front as an infantryman in cognito until dicovered. Later as a nurse in Toul, she heard a bomber pilot
lamenting about his voison missing the next bombing mission.
So she jumped onto her bike, she was turned down from the tour de France due to her gender (but did complete the tour herself 3 times), and rode off to the airfield where she "Volunteered" to fly this Voison in the next raid.
Marie must of been quite convincing to of pulled it off, but she did pilot the aircraft on 2 raids of Frescaty airfield, earning the Croix de Guerre later.
Posted By: maxpeck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/24/16 09:08 PM

Good day at the front for me

Niels Bohr, Sept 1916 flying an Alb DI

First flight, a patrol over the frontlines

My formation keeping is getting a lot better smile2







The new graphics in UE look simply awesome, cheers OBD

Pounced on a couple of Morraines
These shots are just after my second pass





Sadly my victory is not confirmed rolleyes

And one of my squadron gets the second one



About 2 minutes later my engine just stopped
I cannot see any damage, maybe it is just a malfunction?



Look for a field to put down in



Clipped a fence at about 10 feet off the deck, got down safely though



I haven't played WOFF for about a year
I am so impressed with how far it has come along in that time

My entire patrol from start to finish was so immersive, and beautiful to look at and experience

Man - what an awesome game
biggrin

EDIT
Next time I will not JPEG the images
They look a little bit blurry
The originals look pin sharp
Lesson learnt
Posted By: Trooper117

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/24/16 10:05 PM

If you have random failures checked in workshop you can expect engines to conk out at any time...
Last time it happened to me I did a lovely dead stick landing, but didn't see a fence ahead... dead pilot, career over, lol!
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/24/16 10:09 PM

Trooper

At one time a fence was a guaranteed kill for your pilot. That is no longer the case and survival rates are much better. Best to always check for fences if time allows, before touching down.

Cheers
Posted By: Trooper117

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/24/16 10:37 PM

Well, I try to Robert... sometimes they seem to just appear out of nowhere, lol!
Posted By: maxpeck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/24/16 10:37 PM

Originally Posted By: Robert_Wiggins
Trooper

At one time a fence was a guaranteed kill for your pilot. That is no longer the case and survival rates are much better. Best to always check for fences if time allows, before touching down.

Cheers


That's what I figured

I remember from a year ago, a fence was certain death

But it has changed

Did not put it into my OP but I was about 10-20 feet off the ground, saw a fence coming up on my right, quickly pulled up to skip it, then pushed forward so I did not stall it

Skimmed the fence and managed to get down safely winkngrin
Posted By: maxpeck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/24/16 10:39 PM

Originally Posted By: Trooper117
If you have random failures checked in workshop you can expect engines to conk out at any time...
Last time it happened to me I did a lovely dead stick landing, but didn't see a fence ahead... dead pilot, career over, lol!


Yep - this is just the first time it has happened to me biggrin
Posted By: Kremmen

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 12/01/16 09:57 PM

Managed to land my Aviatik into midsection of a tree once. 3 days in hospital. Nothing serious. smile
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 12/03/16 02:39 AM

Some where over France:


Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 12/08/16 06:52 PM

Great screenshots, carrick! That first one, especially! thumbsup
Posted By: Dark_Canuck

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 12/31/16 11:16 AM

My first time properly flying in formation (just upgraded from a gamepad to a proper HOTAS setup) and things are going good. Keeping in my spot and not slamming into my compatriots is taking about 95% of my attention, but I feel fairly safe being in the center of the formation.

And then the sound of bullets and death. I look behind me and I see the yellow spinner of a German HA about two inches off what is left of my tailplane. I was too shocked to take screenshots.

What to name the next guy...
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 02/11/17 04:43 PM

2nd Lt Archie Berry, flying a Fe-2b with 20 Sqn, RFC.

Dearest H,

I've fiddled the RFC mail system with the aid of a corporal in the records office, he's quite a rake. Cost me an arm and a leg but I should be able to write to you without the censors bothering us. Now you're a good girl and I trust you not to show these letters to anyone nor talk about anything I say in them. Mainly because I want someone to know the truth about life here and the war and not that guff they print in the papers. Please keep them under lock and key!

I arrived at Clairmais by tender (It might be in the home atlas if you look it up) in mid March, 1916. They didn't have a machine for me at St Omer and I got tired of waiting around. Luck had it that there was a Sgt there after spark plugs or some such nonsense who was headed to Clairmais so I rode along with him. The weather was terrible when I got here, for a few days there was nothing to do but play cards, drink in the mess and break gramophone records. We have a piano but it is missing a few bits and pieces.

The fronts is quiet in our sector, we mainly conduct line patrols and deep offensive patrols. They're fairly self explanatory, we fly up and down the lines or over Hunland. Deep offensive patrols give me the willies, we're often sent over at 5,000ft which is stupid. It's too low to be 10 miles deep in Hunland. Engines aren't magic carpets, they break quite often and I don't like the thought of having to walk home through all that mud. When I'm ever flight commander we shan't be flying at 5,000ft 10 miles into Hunland, that's for damn sure.

Was lucky enough to bag an Aviatik on my first trip out, we snuck up behind two of them at 7,000ft between Oppy and the Lys. My gunner, Lt Alan Osborn, gave him a drum of Lewis and his wings fell off. Flamer. Lt Reid (HA) confirmed the victory and bought me a drink. The bus had a few holes in the left wing so I had another drink for her as well, a large one.

After that they sent me on a navigational exercise, not sure why, maybe they forgot that I'd already shot down an Aviatik and made it home alive. Bit of a lucky break though, my engine quit just miles from home and I had to deadstick at St Omer, the bus spend 1 day in the shop. Just as well that didn't happen on a DOP. I was fuming that I didn't have enough height to make it all the way home but nobody seemed to care.

Since then I've tangled with various Fokker E.III's on patrol a couple of times. They're the Hun's favourite gag these days, they think it's a hell of a laugh pottering around over the lines and looking for Quirks to blow to buggery. I drove one down the other day around Oppy somewhere, thought we'd nailed him but he was just foxing and spun away from the fight after taking a solid burst from Osborne's Lewis gun. I didn't go down after him, the ground down there has all kind of nasty things in it, most of them German and all of them armed with something. The Fee is a good old bus, she doesn't deserve the coarse handling and leering of barbarous and rapine German infantrymen so I try to keep her high enough to be out of their sight. Those poor E.III's can't do much against a well flown Fee, their engines aren't as powerful as ours her but I will still be taking pains to make sure I'm always above them, that seems to be the key. If I'm not above them I need to be close enough to our lines if things go pear shaped. They are still a danger though, one got poor old Evelyn Paget on the same trip I just mentioned. THis keen young fool in his E.III came screaming in from above and flew right into Paget, guns blazing all the way. I saw the whole bloody mess and I get repeats of it in my sleep at night. Lucky for Paget he's a historical figure so he was able to use this black magic called "programming" to resurrect himself like Lazarus from the wreckage, much to the surprise of the Tommies who came over to poke around at what was left of his Fee. His observer wasn't so lucky though, when I mentioned him to the adjutant he started off muttering about sandbags for some reason. Chap's gone off his rocker.

Must go now, we're on 2 or 3 trips a day since the weather started to improve. Love you my darling, I'll write you when it looks like we'll get some leave. Try to keep the garden in order for me will you, the help have no clue about gardening and I know I can trust you to see to it. The sunshine will do you good.

Fondly, your very own 'King of the Skies' (Since that's how I often feel upon my mighty Bearmore powered throne, provided to me by the aptly named "Royal Aircraft Factory" no less)

2nd Lt Archie Berry.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 02/12/17 06:07 PM

Some where over France.


Posted By: lederhosen

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 02/12/17 06:36 PM

holy cow---- I've never seen a zepplin yet!
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 02/13/17 12:21 AM

2nd Lt Archie Berry, Clairmarais.

20th March, 1916.

Dearest H,

Hello my darling, and thank you for your letter. I'm glad to hear that you're keeping the estate in such fine order. As to your inquiry, if the War Department want to use the back field for an encampment then I suppose we must do our duty and oblige them but I do not want those men intruding upon the nearer grounds. Tell old Tom Smith to keep his shotgun handy and a weather eye out for any "scroungers" in the orchard. Better still, if it does eventuate that this encampment goes ahead, make sure to send one of the help over with a few baskets of fruit and whatever else from the garden to prevent any nosey parkers from trying to help themselves and ending up with their buttocks perforated by buckshot.

I'm sorry if my handwriting isn't entirely up to snuff today, I'm writing this by candlelight while my machine is prepared for a dawn patrol. It's cold here but the weather has been generally pleasant so that means two or three patrols a day.
Things are still much the same here, Alan (Lt Osborne, my observer) and I have been having a jolly old time knocking the spots off of every Hun machine we see. I've put in three more claims since I wrote to you last, three Fokker E.III's. It must be Eindecker season because that's all we see lately.

No matter how many we knock down Master Fritz seems to have more in the big German cupboard that Eindeckers come from. I'm not particularly impressed with these aircraft but we did have rather a close shave the other day, ran into four E.III's in the area near Loos which you will have read about in the papers. Three of us (Paget-Graves, Reid and myself) were around there patrolling there at 6,000ft or so and along comes this cocky #%&*$# trying to attack us from head on and below. I decided to steam off after alone him as he was singleton looking for a fight and nobody else from B Flight seemed inclined to offer this German fellow battle. It wasn't hard to get Alan in position and when he eventually remembered where the trigger was on his Lewis gun he took a few shots and then stopped firing, his Lewis had jammed. Thankfully he sorted it out while I stayed with the Hun and he ended up making short work of the Fokker, sending it down trailing smoke after putting his Lewis gun to rights. Once again however, this Hun employed the ruse so popular with his ilk upon being out maneuvered, namely spinning for the deck and fleeing home. I decided not to follow as we were close to the Hun trenches and, as I said before, I'm not in any way inclined to afford those gentlemen the courtesy of a social visit. A lesson I learned back in 1915 in my poor old Morane Parasol.

Having lost height from a spin while attacking this first Fokker I made for Armentiers at about 5,000ft, spotting A flight at about 7,000 as I made my way West and it was at this point that I learned a valuable lesson: Never climb while over the lines. You see I thought that, since B Flight was nowhere to be seen, I would join A FLight instead and was climbing to reach their altitude when Alan started shouting and pointing and, just in time, I saw that we were in the company of three more Eindeckers! It was a running battle from there on in, they didn't get any shots in at since I kept pur Fee out of their way us but all I could do to further the "Offensive Spirit" was single one out briefly and let Alan have a crack at him before breaking off to maintain my line of retreat towards Armentiers where I knew out foes would be loath to follow.

Alan knocked one down with the pillar mounted gun which surprised me, I've always thought the thing to be a useless extravagance, dead weight really since using the silly thing is more of a danger to Alan than it is to the enemy but Alan is a very determined chap when he gets the bit between his teeth, he has quite the allotment of pluck when things get hairy and sees no problem in climbing out of his nacelle to shoot backwards over the tail. I didn't see much of what was happening behind me as I had to be looking out for three aircraft at the same time but Alan claimed that he sent one of the Fokkers down and his word is good enough for me. Fortunately for us both members from A and B Flight saw our actions and confirmed both Fokkers as being destroyed and, just this morning, the adjutant got a wire from an observation balloon crew who spotted our Fokker from yesterday going down so this brings our score to four machined confirmed destroyed.

We were lucky, what I should have done was make for Armentiers at full speed and THEN climbed back to join A Flight but the sight of them above gave me a false sense of security. Lesson learned.

In other news I've been poking around with a little black magic called "file editing" that I learned from a travelling gypsy who stopped by Clairmarais to sell us some eggs (Corporal May, the one in the records office has some deal with her). I consulted her in ways to instill the proper fighting spirit in the other members of 20 Squadron so that they might take the fight to the enemy but to no effect. Such is the spirit here that, while I may refer to my "Farman Experimental Model 2b" as a "Fighting Experimental", the others here operate their machines as "Fleeing Experimentals" which is a damn shame really. If they'd buck up their act then, between the lot of us, we'd be sending a lot of these Fokkers and Aviatiks down in flames and the war would be over by Christmas. As it stands right now, Alan and I are waging a one man war against the entire perishing Deutsches Luftstreitskrafte!

My machine is almost ready so I must sign off soon but, before I do I was wondering if you have heard from Lord Elliswood about having his stallion sire a foal over Black Bessie, the two should produce a fine progeny for hunting don't you think? If he does agree and deigns to pay a visit, be liberal with the Courvoisier and make sure he keeps his hands to himself. Rotten old lecher. I'm not above reaching for my duelling saber even in this day and age. Speaking of horses though, I've been thinking that we should do some fox hunting when I come home on leave. How would you like that? Just the two of us of course. We can fill our flasks, take a hamper out and make a day of it. There's some good country south of the estate for hunting and "picnicking" Just don't let on to your friends that I take you out on jaunts like that or we'll never hear the end of it! The fitter Sergeant has just informed me that my machine is ready to fly si I must end the letter here my darling.

Devotedly yours,

Archie.

P.S. It's late enough in the season now to begin summer planting, I don't think we'll be getting any more frost so do remember to get the vegetable patch in order.
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 02/14/17 12:17 AM

21st March, 1916

Dearest H,

A quick note in case you read anything in the papers, we got into a bit of a scrap the other day on afternoon patrol and HQ is sending a correspondent, I don't want you worrying if you happen to see 20 Squadron or my name in the paper. The Huns have just captured Vimy and things are heating up here in our sector, Fokkers are on the warpath as well. Alan and I have just put in two claims in after the last patrol, an Aviatik (Sort of like a German Be2c but much better organised) and a Fokker.

Alan and I got into a grand old beano with three Fokkers and ended up landing, well, crashing really, near an army camp north of Arras but we're both unharmed so don't worry if you read about it in the newspaper. I say this as I have been ordered to report to Corps HQ to speak with a press correspondent regarding the action over Arras. Neither Alan nor I thought much of our scrap at the time except for regret that our dear old Fee had to be driven home on the back of a tender but it seems that HQ wants a positive story to counter the bad news about Vimy I suppose and, rumour has it that some Froggy chap recently raised his score of victories to ten so, if our victories are confirmed, that will put Alan and I at a total of six and give our papers a chance to show the people at home that the RFC is keeping its' end up and not being outdone by a bunch of wine swilling Frenchmen.

I'm sending this missive with one of the troops who is going home for training as an observer. We often take NCO's up and show them the ropes just to maintain an emergency reserve. He's a good lad, name of Sergeant Darling. He's not a public school boy so he may feel somewhat out of his element at the estate. Make sure that he gets a good meal before he leaves and please do try not be too embarrassed if he insists on calling you 'ma'am' or 'your ladyship', which he may. Have old Tom lunch with you both and then drive him to Farnborough in the motor.

Also, we're running a little short of various sundries here. If you could arrange to have the following list delivered to Clairmarais then all of us here should be eternally grateful:

1 x Cricket bat, the last one got broken on mess night.
A dozen gramophone records (The chaps here love 'Rag', you'll know best what to get.)
10 x safety razors.
A crate of plum jam, marmalade or whatever conserves are available.
A case of whisky.
A case of stout.
5 x tins of pipe tobacco

Use my chequing account with Lloyds to pay for it all please dear and have Harrods deliver them using my name. I will also be writing to Lloyds to increase the household funds and transferring a sum in your account to provide for you in the event that any of the help get drafted or sent to do war work which I now feel is inevitable, please let me know if and when you require more money sooner rather than later should things get tight. I don't want my dear little tulip going without, war be damned. Enjoy the spring my love, I'll be home on leave as soon as I can manage it but, with the way things are right now, you may not be hearing from me for a while.

Yours, with ardour and devotion,

Archie.
Posted By: Raine

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 02/14/17 12:29 AM

Jimmy, some fine letters with good period flavour. I'll look forward to reading more. You should consider joining the Centenary DiD, where there are a few of us who like the creative writing as much as the flying.

Cheers, mate!
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 02/14/17 12:47 AM

Thanks Raine,

I'd like to join the DiD but I only have WoFF 1 so that might put me at a disparity with other players for various reasons. As soon as I upgrade to WoFF UE I'll definitely look into giving it a shot since I follow the thread avidly.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 02/15/17 07:02 PM

Some Where over France.



Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 02/17/17 10:52 AM

From the Daily Telegraph, 22nd March, 1916.

Our Airmen's War in the Air.

Many Telegraph readers will by now be familiar with names like Roland Garros and Oswald Boelcke, men who have been dubbed by many as "Aces" of the skies over the Western Front. Today, it is my privilege to report to you today the exploits of one of our own emerging "Aces", 2nd Lt Archie Berry of 20 Squadron. Royal Flying Corps. 2nd Lt Berry, the son of Lord Berry of "The Great Vale" Estate near Elmstead has recently joined the growing ranks of the "Aces", men who have destroyed several enemy aircraft in combat. With eight confirmed German aircraft destroyed to his credit, Berry has been involved in numerous actions against the formidable Fokker aircraft favoured by Oswald Boelcke that has been so commonly employed by Germany over the front to harass our own men and machines. Berry was well know at Eton for his fencing prowess and now he is well known in his squadron for his aggressive duelling tactics against the Fokker scourge and his willingness to fight the Hun even when outnumbered.

The skies over the city of Arras played host to his latest exploit, the destruction of a Fokker aircraft in aerial battle. The German aircraft lost control and crashed within view of the residents of the town, encamped soldiers and this correspondent alike. As one rapt human mass we watched in awe and terror as Berry piloted his machine against no less than three German aircraft, wheeling through the air as gracefully as a hawk, hounding the Germans and driving two away before sending the third out of control to his end, face down into the mud. According to Berry this is not an uncommon feat for the men of the RFC, when I spoke to him a day after his action over Arras Berry said "Our men are with at least two of theirs and we have two of them in our busses to their one, Master Fritz doesn't stand a chance no matter how many Fokkers he comes along with." Inspiring words from an officer fresh from battle and a dramatic crash landing which occurred as a result of damage to his aircraft after the gallant action, both Berry and his observer were unharmed. I had thought that my story would end here but, as though to prove his statement to the press true. our offices have today received a communique that Berry has been credited with two more Fokkers today after yet another battle with no less than four (with some sources claiming five) enemy aircraft in the area of Ypres.

It's our pleasure to inform our readers that 2nd Lt Berry has been recommended for a decoration by his commanding officer, Captain Edward Skidmore. What we anticipate as being the first of many decorations for Archie Berry, an officer of true British stripe who is taking the fight to the enemy wherever he may find him.

Editor's Note: We have received news after proofing that 2nd Lt Archie Berry has been awarded the Distinguished Service Order and will be gazetted in tomorrow's morning edition of the Daily Telegraph. His investiture is expected to take place at Buckingham Palace some time in April.



Telegram to "H"

Dearest H (stop)
Have been in the thick of it (stop)
Prepare for a visit to the Palace (stop)
More in the Telegraph (stop)
They didn't even mention Alan (stop)
Please have Harrods send 5 Wreaths (stop)
I am fine (stop)
Fondly, AB (stop)


Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 02/17/17 07:10 PM

Some where over France.


Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 02/17/17 08:42 PM

What's that one at the top with the funny tail Carrick? A Hannover?
Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 02/17/17 09:27 PM

Yep, that's a Hannover.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 02/18/17 06:59 PM

yep thats it. I will put up better pics later.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 02/18/17 07:03 PM

Some where over France


Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 02/18/17 07:20 PM

On the Enemy Side of the Lines.

Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 02/25/17 10:44 PM

Some where over France



Attached picture CFS3 2017-02-25 14-25-24-31.jpg
Attached picture CFS3 2017-02-25 14-38-15-03.jpg
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/13/17 09:50 PM

Somewhere in France.




Attached picture CFS3 2017-03-13 14-58-04-12.jpg
Posted By: Raine

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/15/17 03:10 PM

Beautiful pics, Carrick!!
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/16/17 04:57 PM

wave

We need a larger format for pics in order to do justice to WOFFUE
Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/16/17 06:39 PM

+1
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/08/17 07:03 PM

Jimmy, I agree with Raine. You are putting up some dandy reports Sir! Keep it up, it's fine reading with my morning coffee.
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/09/17 04:05 AM

Originally Posted by Robert_Wiggins
Jimmy, I agree with Raine. You are putting up some dandy reports Sir! Keep it up, it's fine reading with my morning coffee.


Thanks chaps, sorry to be a lag on the writing front. Old Archie's taking a hiatus at the moment as I am busy with other things but I'll get back into the swing of it soon enough. I have my work cut out for me livestreaming and making videos among other things at the moment, never fear though, Archie, Alan and their mighty Fee are still with us, just waiting for me to be able to fit them in somewhere..
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/13/17 10:10 AM

Ok, due to reasons Archie Berry has been retired from service.

Introducing, Augustin Kolb. Latterly an accountant in a small finance firm in Cologne, now undergoing training at Maubeuge airfield, Belgium.

March 25, 1916.

Maubeuge aerodrome and zeppelin yard Belgium.

Liebliche Marie,

I am writing to you from Belgium after a long week of obstructions, bad food and uncomfortable travel. When my approval for flight training was granted by the certification board I felt sure that the problems and obstacles standing in the way of me realising my dream of flying would be over but it seems that they were just the beginning. No sooner had I arrived at the aerodrome here than did the weather take a turn for the worse, we've spent the last few days huddled next to a coke stove in the hangars the learning theory of flight and cockpit drills. Our flight kommandant, Hauptmann Auslösers, is a strange man, very uptight and with a tendency to hysterical outbursts but at the same time he can be quite lax in a very ungerman way. We're not quite sure what to make of him and his strange and capricious attitude but being in his presence is unsettling to say the least since, although his behaviour is altogether eccentric his eyes tell a different story to his actions. I can see him summing each and every one of us up like a hawk surveys a mouse on the field far below him. Auslösers has no time for jests and expects immediate obedience and complete focus during his classes which can be difficult to maintain in the freezing cold, with a poor diet and considering that we are kept awake half the night by the background noise of the aerodrome at night and our fears and misgivings taking their toll.

After four interminable days of snow, shouting and sleeplessness I finally went aloft for the first time and I must tell you that it is a marvellous experience. The weather cleared enough for us to wheel out an Aviatik biplane onto the field. Every pupil got to experience flight from the observer's cockpit which is situated ahead of the pilot while the others watched on, keeping an eye out for a change in the weather and hoping that their turn would not be delayed (or that it would in some cases). I was fortunate enough to be first, Hauptmann Auslösers helped me to situate myself in the front cockpit, checked that I was correctly secured by the safety harness and then clambered in behind me. The preparation for the flight seemed to take longer than the flight itself, which was over in what seemed like no time at all. I was giddy with excitement when we left the ground, there was so much to look at all of a sudden, the long grey rectangle of the Zeppelin shed which dominates the landscape of Maubeuge like the great barn of some fantastical leviathan. A long column of 30 or so trucks were rattling along the road East out of the aerodrome at what seemed to me to be impossibly slow speed compared to the 140 or so kilometers an hour that we were travelling at and Forests, Marie, as far as the eye can see. To see such things defies description.

Many people report a feeling of airsickness, I had fretted about this but the problem never eventuated until the very end of the flight when Hauptmann Auslösers pulled back on the throttle to make the aircraft descent for landing, the sudden lurch downwards and the fact that we seemed to come very close to the trees below caused quite a turmoil in my stomach. I managed to maintain my honour for the remaining duration of the flight but upon being helped down from the cockpit I'm ashamed to admit that I disgraced myself by vomiting on the Hauptmann's boots. Expecting a blow or some harsh words from Auslösers I flinched, looking up sheepishly at his sharp, fair skinned face. He was grinning broadly, obviously trying not to laugh.

"What do you think Flieger Kolb? Is flying the game for you?"

"Jawhol Herr Hauptmann!" I blurted out, straightening myself and wiping my mouth in an attempt to regain some dignity.

"Gut, we'll go up again then this afternoon, go have some breakfast." and then he did a strange thing, he slapped me on the back and cried "Hals und Beinbruch!". I'm not sure what that means yet but I did feel as though I had passed some kind of test.

[Linked Image]
Maubeuge Zeppelin Shed housing L.30.

[Linked Image]
Aviatik with Hauptmann Auslösers at the controls
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/13/17 11:31 AM

Just as an interesting little addendum:

German Triggers got Flieger Kolb killed on his second orientation flight. Useless idiot crashed into the trees on the approach to Maubeuge and killed them both. Luckily I intervened and taskmanagered Kolb back to life but the gods were angry at me for abusing time travel to resurrect him and gave me a black screen at the end of my next orientation flight (Which I landed personally from the front seat since I no longer trust German Triggers with Kolb's safety.) Finally, when I reloaded the game, the campaign had been corrupted somehow so I have been forced to battle these arcane and generally unfair attempts by some malevolent force to terminate Flieger Kolb's career prematurely by plugging him into "Der Matrix". In the space of two days he has been resurrected, re-enlisted and manually redeployed to KEK West (Jasta 12) Where he occasionally has strange dreams about being in a blank white room with Lawrence Fishburne while some mysterious force teaches him Kung Fu, how to roll his own sushi and the peculiarities of flying a Fokker E.II.

Flieger Kolb is not sure why the universe hates him so much but he feels as though a benevolent force (whom he imagines as being a tired, bearded man with sad eyes, illuminated by the glow of some arcane device through which he monitors the universe and watches over Kolb) is mitigating the worst of what malevolence an unfair and capricious universe throws at him.
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/13/17 01:31 PM

Flieger Augustin "Boots" Kolb KEK West (Jasta 12) Vivaise, Marne Region, France.

27th Mar 1916, 1030hrs.

Liebchen,

It's only been few days since my last letter but I wanted to tell you that I have made my first successful operational sortie and seen, with my own eyes, the Western Front. The weather here is terrible, worse than it was at Maubeuge even, and I spent the best part of an hour over the lines patrolling one of our observation balloons being buffeted and thrown about by the March winds. I am completely exhausted and the nip of schnapps that is partaken of by all pilots on returning a patrol is making me sleepy so I will try to write quickly before I retire to my quarters to take a nap before lunch. 5 aircraft took of from Vivaise, Fokker E.II's and E.III's (Although I can't tell the difference between them yet, they all look the same). I have been assigned an E.II and, after the old Aviatik, it doesn't seem like there's much aircraft between me and the outside world.

It's bitterly cold here and I reek of whale grease and lanolin, substances we use to prevent frostbite. I have to wear so many layers of clothing that I need two men to assist me in finding the stirrup with which I must mount my aircraft and lift me aboard. You know how I never liked the cold, well, I can tell you that this place is hell but it is also fascinating. As I said our patrol took us within sight of the lines and I saw them, a wilderness of pockmarks and snow that stretches beyond imagining. The perverse absurdity of such massive destruction is fantastic, I cannot fathom how we as a species have come to this when I recall the few brief glimpses I got of that hell between struggling with my Fokker in the gusts and turbulence. Four of us set off, with another in reserve for top cover and for most of their flight we struggled along through the icy blasting of the French March wind. At one point I looked to my left and saw that an aircraft was missing, Leutnant Laack. He was with us one second, gone the next. We continued on, I learned what became of Laack later but his absence filled me with dread and, as though to mirror my apprehensions, the weather closed in half way through our flight. I felt as though I were lost in a forest, a forest in which I was very much a stranger but the other two Fokkers soldiered on and so I stayed with them.

It's very hard to see anything below you in the Fokker E.II, the broad wing hides the ground most of the time and I soon realised that I had precisely no idea of where I was, I just followed and followed for what seemed an age until the flight leader suddenly turned and descended. During our descent I saw ahead of us a distant aircraft. Initially I thought it may have been French but our course and the descent told me otherwise, it was our top cover aircraft, we were on the way home. The weather cleared a little just as we neared home, enough for me to see from the position of the sun that we had been up for an hour. I couldn't even see the airfield until we were right over the top of it, somehow it had hidden itself under my wing, so I have a lot of catching up to do in order to be a competent and useful pilot around here. Anyway, I was pleased to find Leutnant Laack waiting for us in the duty room, he had even stoked the stove for us and for the first time in forever I started to feel my circulation returning. It was painful but I daren't show it since we all suffer the same and Leutnant Laack's story of engine failure and his glide back to base made me feel as though my trials for the day had been minimal to say the least, he could very easily have been killed but he is an experienced pilot with 4 victories already!

We seem to have enough to contend with against the elements and our own aircraft here dear Marie, adding the increasingly hostile French aircraft to that equation is something that causes me grave concern. I am keen to hear from Laack about his victories and stories of fighting the French machines but he is taciturn and sometimes hard to approach, perhaps in time he will open up and divulge a little but I must be tactful.

Tschuss,

Augustin.

[Linked Image]

Leutnant Laack silhouetted against the sun and sky shortly before his engine failure.

[Linked Image]

Life at Vivaise, taken after landing.

Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/14/17 02:26 AM

Ace Pilto;

I am enjoying your reports immensely Sir! Prime reading with my morning coffee! You have a real talent for writing! Keep them coming!!
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/14/17 09:34 PM

Thanks RW, consider yourself one of my sources of inspiration for giving it a go. Old Flieger Kolb is kind of a dress rehearsal in a sense for a larger work I'm planning and also for participation in one of the great historical challenges you guys have going.
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/15/17 12:11 AM

Originally Posted by Ace_Pilto
Thanks RW, consider yourself one of my sources of inspiration for giving it a go. Old Flieger Kolb is kind of a dress rehearsal in a sense for a larger work I'm planning and also for participation in one of the great historical challenges you guys have going.


Ace;

You use fine descriptive phrases that paint the picture well. I should have such talent! The are a few writers on this forum I aspire to, three of which are Four of which are RAF_Louvert, Raine, Lederhosen and now yourself. There are others as well, but these four set the bar for me personally. Lou is pretty much on the road these days and modding so has little to contribute to the tales of the DiD. Raine is also away in old Blighty on family business, so you and Lederhosen are now the men! Thanks again for your contributions, and I look forward to any of your renderings!

Cheers
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/15/17 01:37 AM

Well it's always motivating to have such a gracious audience Rob, I'll try to keep Kolb alive long enough for his story to evolve.

As such Flieger Kolb's latest jaunt was a cross country navigation flight to Sissonne, Guignicourt and Bruyeres-et-Montberault and back. There is little to report except that the front is quiet and snow is still on the ground. Right now a long hot soak in the bathtub rates highest among Kolb's list of dreams for the future.

I do have a very good time while flying with Kolb, he is my complete immersion character so I fly very differently when I have him active. After his last flight I just sat on the airfield and waited for A flight to return and, during that time I sat and waited I noticed that some genius had given the ambient soundtrack the faintest hint of a gramophone playing in the distance (or maybe that is my overactive imagination) anyway, we sat there in the weak sunlight under the watery blue sky until the buzz of rotaries announced that both of A flights machines had returned and I watched them spiral down and land. One of them came down a little hard, bouncing over the grass and snow, the other made a smoother job of it and rolled to a neat stop beside the first. I daresay Kolb is feeling pleased with himself for finding his way around the waypoints and getting a cheeky look at the front while doing so.

Not worth a letter to Marie but that's the latest news from Vivaise.
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/17/17 09:22 PM

The snow at Vivaise slowly gave way to rain, icy slush and mud began to make life difficult for everyone.

A machine broke it's tether and embedded itself deep in the thawing ground after a brief uncontrolled flight caused by a sudden gust of wind. It took a team of men to dig the machine out and smooth over the rut that was left as best they could but that part of the field would be a danger until the ground was once more firm enough to be rolled flat. Kolb and his compatriots spent most of their time trying to get warm around one of the many coke stoves scattered around the airfield and flying was restricted to local patrols only since the threat of the weather closing in and leaving a flight with nowhere to land was too great. There was no sign of the French in the sector and the "Hours Total" column in Kolb's logbook was slowly increasing.

The only sign Kolb has seen so far that there was really a war hidden among all this bad weather was anti-aircraft fire. Dirty white puffs of explosive appeared in the sky on one patrol over the lines and were replaced by black puffs upon crossing the lines. Kolb had heard of the difference between German shells and those used by the enemy and the sight of black smoke in the air caused him to scan the air vigorously, banking too and fro and craning his neck to cover as much sky as possible. The sight of german anti aircraft shells bursting all around convinced Kolb that there may have been a French machine in his immediate vicinity but it was not the case. No machine revealed itself. Kolb asked Leutnant Laack about the flak, Laack laughed.

"They were probably aimed at us dear Kolb"

Kolb supposed that it was possible for the German gunners to have glimpsed their machines above and failed to correctly identify them as friendly but to open fire without certainty seemed to him irresponsible to say the least and potentially a downright dereliction of duty!

"Nevermind Kolb" Said Laack, poking at the stove in a half hearted attempt to coax more heat from the coals. "Just mark the area on your map and be careful over there in future, never expect everyone to do the right thing all the time. This is war, not a parade."

That night Kolb dreamed of Marie receiving a telegram telling her that her husband had been killed by his own side's flak. She burned the telegram in a stove identical to the ones on the airfield. The creak of the hinge as she closed the stove door awoke Kolb abruptly and he saw the dim silhouette of Laack crouched over the stove in their quarters. They'd moved into the same room. Rain drummed on the roof as Kolb's wits slowly gathered themselves to lucidity.

"The flight commander wants us up in an hour, better get moving Kolb."

"What's the fuss?" Kolb asked

"Airfields, we're on defensive patrol. HQ thinks the French may try to send some planes through the muck to snoop." Laack handed Kolb a cup of coffee.

"It's the good stuff, someone found a sack of real coffee beans. Deserving of a Pour le Merit in my opinion."

Kolb grinned and drank.

*****

The patrol was nothing particularly eventful. Laack, Kolb and the Flight commander who went by the nickname Kobes bounced around in the grey wilderness for over an hour while A flight lingered in the air 2,000ft above them. Kobes was a good formation leader, conscientious about the ability of his flight to keep pace and never one to linger in the air when conditions were poor in the vain hope of sighting an enemy. In fact the clouds were so numerous and thick that the entire French air force could have been aloft and B flight would have been none the wiser. Eventually Kobes led the formation back to Vivaise where they spiralled down out of the grey and gingerly alit upon the treacherously slushy ground of the field without mishap.

It was the last day of March.

[Linked Image]

Kolb, Laack and Kobes being fired upon by "friendly" flak.
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/19/17 10:42 AM

2 Apr 1916.

Kolb landed at Vivaise and steered his Eindecker toward the canvas hangar where his rigger and fitter Werner and Klaus were waiting, he switched off the engine and sat staring blankly at the instrument panel. Werner and Klaus could tell something was wrong, usually Kolb couldn't get out of his machine and in front of a stove quick enough but today he just sat there, not moving. Werner and Klaus shared a concerned glance and approached the machine to see if Kolb had been injured or if he was ill.

"Are you ok sir?" Klaus asked.

Kolb said nothing, just stared forwards.

"Sir?"

Klaus placed his foot into the stirrup of the machine and swung himself up alongside Kolb, placing a hand on his shoulder and shaking him gently. Kolb flinched and stared at Kaus, his eyes slightly unfocused.

"Sir! We thought you might have been wounded, are you alright sir? Where's Leutnant Laack?"

It hadn't even occurred to Kolb on the flight home that he would have to be the one to announce the bad news, Laack was dead, hit aircraft had been hit by flak while attacking a balloon a few miles SW of Soissons, it had all been over faster than it takes to draw a breath.

"Was hier passiert?" called an approaching, authoritative voice. It was Hauptmann Meinecke, he'd seen Kolb land alone and ridden a bicycle across the field to ask Kolb what had happened.

"We don't know sir, he seems to be-- frozen."

"Step down."

Meinecke produced a silver flask from his hip pocket and fumbled with the lid, he proffered it up to Kolb, waving the opening beneath his nose. Kolbs blue eyes slowly wandered down toward the flask and then his hand reached for it. He took a draught and handed it back to the Hauptmann.

"Where's Laack Kolb?"

Something uncoiled in Kolb, his frozen, upright posture relaxed as he spoke as though ice were sliding from his veins.

"He's dead Herr Hauptmann, flak got him."

They'd taken off together early that morning, accompanied by the usual grey clouds and rain. It had been a day just like any other . It had even looked like it might clear up at one stage of the flight with the sun peeping through the overcast at broken intervals but it was all an illusion. The sun only wanted to watch the show. After reaching Soissons Kolb had led them both down through an opening in the clouds, they were hunting a balloon which had been directing a particularly troublesome artillery exchange to the north. The balloon was reported to be alongside the road out of Soissons by about 5 miles and the pair were following the road at 4,000ft to find out if it was still there. It was there alright, Laack saw it first. Kolb had been too high to attack but Laack was in perfect position, he dove for the balloon and Kolb watched as the dirty grey clouds of flak appeared around Laacks machine, one of them materialised near enough to touch Laacks Eindecker and Kolb gasped, the Fokker twitched and then plunged headlong and uncontrolled toward the grey gasbag with Laack slumped at the controls. The machine and the balloon merged and a brilliant orange glow momentarily lit the underside of the overcast in the immediate area while Kolb watched, horrified, circling above and staring in disbelief as the tangled remains of the balloon and Laack made their way earthward, entangled perversely like a pair of doomed, blazing lovers. Kolb was reaching the end of recounting Laack's demise when the sound of an inline engine made them both pause and be silent.

"Ours or theirs Herr Hauptmann?"

"I'm not sure Kolb, there is a unit of Aviatiks over at Sissonne, maybe one of them could have gotten lost. Stay in your machine, with A Flight still away you might have to take off again and chase it if it turns out to be French."

Kolb nodded and they waited, along the front to the south some cannons began roar but the engine noise was still audible between the screech and boom of the shells. Among the increasing din Kolb fancied he heard the distinct 'Thwack-thwack" of flak shells, Meinecke also heard it and he glanced sharply at Kolb.

"Start her up!" he cried to Werner and Klaus who had been waiting at a polite distance, hoping that they would be allowed to wheel the machine in out of the rain before lunch. Now their thoughts of lunch were forgotten as they rushed to restart the engine. The engine should have started immediately, it was still warm from the morning's use but, for some reason, it refused to roar into life no matter how they cajoled and cursed it. The drone of the inline receded and, a few minutes after that the cannons fell silent again. Werner and Klaus were already probing at the engine.

"Bad luck Kolb, it seems as though you won't see your first French machine today." sighed Meineck. "Come on down and get something to eat, I'll need your report on Laack by this afternoon."

Kolb nodded, he dismounted and helped Werner and Klaus push the machine back into its' canvas hangar. He lingered while they clambered over her, manufacturing excuses to keep him on the field while he waited for A flight to return. Kolb knew he was putting off writing the report, he was hesitating because he knew that, once the report was written, it would be official. Kolb wanted a few more moments with Laack, remembering his long beak of a nose dripping with condensation over a steaming cup of coffee, his wry grin and especially the gentle and patient tone that Laack used when explaining something perfectly obvious to the neophyte Kolb.

The report, breakfast, Meinecke...

They could all wait until A flight returned.

[Linked Image]

Kolb above the clouds, returning alone from Soissons.
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/19/17 06:57 PM

I hope you all don't mind me using this thread as my personal waffling space, I've become very invested in Kolb. almost 12 hours of flight time and we know all the clouds above the Aisne by their first names

Kolb had no time to mourn Laack, he was flying again after lunch. The weather cleared and he was sent to patrol over Rosnay, keeping an eye on the field for signs of enemy activity. It was an uneventful flight, Kolb spotted Kobes on the way to Rosnay and flew alongside him for a while. Flak greeted them when they arrived and they circled, climbed and dove to throw off the gunners aim. Kolb was quite busy evading flak, watching the field and scanning the sky, too busy to keep track of Kobes who vanished after a while, leaving Kolb alone over Rosnay with nothing but dirty white puffs of flak to keep him company. Kolb was starting to hate flak, the indifferent brutality of it and the knowledge that if a shell has your name on it then, the fact that it bears your name is immutable. Looking down at Rosnay Kolb could see the indistinct silhouette of a French machine on the ground, he didn't recognise the type but he took consolation in the fact that he had finally sighted his first enemy machine. Kolb left Rosnay and headed towards Reims, it was a short flight, 15 miles or so and it had occurred to him that there might be French machines aloft in the area, perhaps patrolling Guignicourt or using Reims as a staging point for a patrol. He thought he saw another machine over the lines but it was merely a balloon, the balloon reminded him of Laack so he flew away from it and headed for home.

*****

In the mess that night the emptiness of Laack's chair drew a few glances from the others but little discussion, Meinecke had told them what happened. They glanced at the chair occasionally, then at Kolb between mouthfuls of stew. Kobes, Kolb's flight commander broke the silence,

"Kolb, I heard that you took your training at Maubeuge under Hauptmann Auslosers?"

Kolb, who had been avoiding the gaze of the others fearing that he may be judged for returning alive when Laack, an experienced pilot with 5 victories, had not was surprised to be the object of curiosity and not resentment.

"Yes Herr Leutnant, I was at Maubeuge with Hauptmann Auslosers for flight training"

"Please Kolb, two 'Herr Leutnants' a day only, once in the morning and once at night ok. Between hours call me Josefs, survive here a month and you can call me Jacob."

The other two, Weiss, a white haired Balt from Peenemunde and Dombrowe a stocky Swabian chuckled, Meinecke smiled thinly.

"Is it true you puked on the Hauptmann's boots after your first flight?"

A tide of crimson flooded Kolb's cheeks, his ears began to tingle. He nodded.

"He took it quite well, I had them cleaned for him of course"

"Well, we shall have to call you 'Boots' then."

Weiss and Dombrowe erupted in gales of laughter, even the stern Meinecke tittered. Kolb listened to their laughter and noticed that It wasn't directed at him, it was laughter for the sake of having something to laugh at. It was infectious laughter and it swept Kolb away with it. Looking at their faces Kolb began to feel as though he were beginning to be accepted among this group of withdrawn, sardonic, often intense and penetratingly perceptive strangers.

"Did you know that Laack suffered terribly from nausea?" Kobes asked, Kolb nodded, Laack has confessed to him that he often felt queasy in even mildly turbulent air. The laughter slowly faded at the mention of Laack and Meinecke discretely gestured to one of the mess attendants. He whispered something to the man when he came over and the attendant promptly went over to the bar and brought back a bottle of schnapps and six glasses. He placed a glass before each man and the final glass in front of Laack's empty chair. Pouring a tot of schnapps into each glass as he went.

When the attendant was done, Meinecke lifted his glass. The room became silent.

"Hals and Beinbruch." He toasted, raising his glass toward the empty seat, the others followed suit and drained their glasses. Laack's glass stood untouched for the rest of the evening at his place. His ghost, if he had one, would drink it in Valhalla.

*****

3th April, 1916.

"#%&*$#." Kolb swore.

He didn't swear often but this was a unique circumstance. Kolb was at 5,000ft over Fismes and the sound of his own voice shocked him. It was strange to be able to hear it so clearly at this height and the hollowness of his single expletive seemed to resound among the absence of the usual clattering racket made by the Oberursel engine of his Fokker E.II which, at this moment, was silent having been starved of fuel. Apart from his own vocalised sentiment pertaining to the situation, all Kolb could listen to now was the whistle of the air through the bracing wires and the faint buzz of Kobes and Weiss' machines circling above him as he descended towards the Aisne. It was clear to Kolb that he would not be making it home to Vivaise that day, there was no way he could stretch out his glide to the brownish haze of no man's land in the distance. Distantly, the guns rumbled their agreement with Kolb's assessment.

Flak had been the culprit, over Rosnay. Kolb had been assigned to Sperrflug, watching over any two seaters operating in the area, and had reached his patrol sector only to find the air completely devoid of any two seaters to protect as usual so he had decided to snoop around Rosnay in search of French machines. The gunners had been waiting for Kolb, they didn't like having Eindeckers visiting their field and they had prepared for Kolb's visit by using trigonometry to estimate the cloud base and range their guns accordingly. Kolb had been surprised at the accuracy of the flak when he arrived at Rosnay and quickly turned away, but he had come too close. Kolb had heard the impact of shell fragments striking his machine and frantically slammed open the throttle and veered North towards safety, jinking, diving and climbing as he went. He escaped the barrage but the smell of petrol alerted him to the fact that his machine was in trouble, a glance at the fuel gauge confirmed it, his fuel was running out fast. Kolb climbed as steeply as he dared, knowing that he would need all the height he could get but it was no use, the lines were too far distant and the Eindecker was a reluctant glider. The thin, shining ribbon of the Aisne cut across the landscape below and Kolb decided that he at least would have to make it over the river if he were to have any chance of escape. He nosed the Eindecker down toward a flat looking field on the northern side of the river and steered his machine deftly between two stands of trees at the edge of his chosen landing ground.

Fortunately the field was quite large and, except for a gentle incline, relatively flat and well grazed. Kolb's machine rattled and bumped to a stop and Kolb sat for a moment waiting for a sign or an idea as to what he should do next. His problem was solved for him when a quintet of blue clad figures emerged from the trees along the riverside and pointed their long rifles at him. Kolb dismounted from his machine and they took him with them to an outpost where, after some animated jabbering and gesticulating, they pushed Kolb into a small shed and locked the door behind them while they presumably went to find an officer to interrogate him. The shed had one door, a table, chair. some shelves that were strewn with dusty tins and papers and one window that was closed over with wire instead of a window. Kolb sat on the chair and, much to his chagrin, a bolt of pain shot through his left buttock. Reaching down and expecting to have sat on a nail Kolb was surprised to find a ragged tear in the backside of his flying breeches and blood on his hand. The wound wasn't serious, the undercarriage strut had absorbed most of the force from the shell fragment and sent it spinning though the bottom of the Eindecker cockpit, the wicker chair and Kolb's breeches where it finished it's tumultuous journey by making a small nick in Kolb's backside.

Eventually an officer came to interrogate Kolb, his German was terrible and the man seemed more interested in the long black pipe that he had brought with him to smoke than he did in any of Kolb's replies. Kolb managed to impart to the officer that he was hungry and that he had been injured, the officer sniffed, prodded his pipe some more and agreed that Kolb should be seen to by the camp medical officer and then fed. They took Kolb to the infirmary where he was given a perfunctory examination and a small dressing for his battle honour and then they took him to the field kitchen where they served him some kind of gruel and stale bread. Kolb choked the stuff down and they marched him back to his cell shed when he was done. Kolb sat and waited, there was nothing for it he supposed, at least his backside wasn't aching too much but he felt as though a cushion would make sitting more bearable. Looking around the room Kolb spied a blanket on one of the shelves, that would provide some padding at least. He walked over to the shelf and reached for the blanket and, as he did, his hand closed over something hard and cold that had been left lying underneath it. It was the head of a claw hammer, the handle had long ago been broken and the broken tool must have sat abandoned in the shed for some time. None of the soldiers had thought to search the place it seemed or they had not been very thorough. Kolb eyed the glassless window and the wire that secured it, he could easily use the claw of the hammer to prise away the nails that had been hastily hammered in place to fasten the barbed wire across the gap and prevent egress via the window but Kolb would have to wait until night, or someone may see him. Kolb replaced the blanket and the hammerhead, went back to his chair and distracted himself from the ache of his buttock by praying that nobody came to move him from here until tomorrow.

His prayers were answered.

[Linked Image]
Kolb's machine in a meadow on the north bank of the Aisne.
Posted By: Adger

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/19/17 07:26 PM

Ace I love your screenies and reports mate..brilliant stuff cheers
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/19/17 07:40 PM

Another fine report Ace. You have some real talent there for writing. You have left us with a cliff hangar with this one. I look forward to each report. Glad to see Kolb has a chance to escape. I am very much looking forward to the escape story.
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/19/17 08:01 PM

Thanks guys. I'm glad you're enjoying Kolb's story along with me. The whole glide down I was fretting that this would be the end, it was a tense few minutes for me, realising I would land inside the lines having never even seen an enemy machine in the air in my entire 12 hours of flight! Fortunately, for those of you who are following Kolb's adventure, the RNG gods were kind to me and Kolb does escape after spending two days as a guest of the French so Kolb will return.

Interestingly, his name derives from the word "Kolbe" which is the high German for a mace or war club as I found out today. Hopefully he will survive long enough to live up to his name by striking the foe rather than being renowned solely for his inadvertent befouling of German Triggers' boots.
Posted By: BuckeyeBob

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/20/17 11:37 PM

Great story, Ace! You have a true gift. I actually became a little choked up after reading about Laack's demise. Bravo, sir!
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/21/17 05:54 AM

Glad you're enjoying the tale Bob, it's good to know that I'm hitting the mark that I'm aiming for. (One of the great things about the internet, writing fiction has become performance art and is no longer having the life strangled out of it by greedy publishers.)

Anyway, back to Kolb...

Kolb watched the small patch of light that shone through the wire covered window make its' way across the floor and up the wall where, as the sun set, it eventually evaporated altogether. There was a sentry sat outside the door of the shed assigned to guard Kolb and Kolb knew that his best bed would be to work on the wire in the dark and while there was enough noise in the French army camp, which is where he presumed he was, to mask the noise that his efforts were sure to make. The camp obliged Kolb with plenty of opportunity to do this just this, it was fairly abuzz with activity. Tenders clattering and jolting up and down heavily rutted roads, columns of troops on the march, officers shouting and the typical hum of army life going on all around. The wood in the frame was also damp from the almost incessant rain of the previous week which had made it soft and workable. Kolb set to work when he thought it was near midnight and it took him no time at all to work the wire free from one half of the window. He'd work a nail loose, replace the hammer and blanket and creep to the door to listen for movement. Kolb knew that he had to take this one step at a time, if he was caught at the window he would certainly be moved, or worse, so his excessive caution was founded in his calculation that spending as little continuous time at the window as possible gave him the best chance of completing his task and making his bid for freedom.

Patiently Kolb continued his labours until the entirety of the barbed wire blocking the window fell free, then he rolled up the blanket, slipped the hammer in his pocket and climbed through the window. The night was especially dark, the French were careful not to show any light of a night time in case it drew the attention of a German bomber crew and this blackout meant that Kolb found it relatively easy to slip out of the camp and into a nearby wood where he rested for a few minutes to take stock of his possessions and situation. He had no food or water, his clothing was immediately recognisable as that of a flier but it concealed his uniform. He had his watch, the hammerhead and the blanket. Judging bu the position of the moon Kolb estimated that he had 5 hours to get as far as possible from the camp until someone noticed that he was missing so he took a bearing off of Polaris and started to walk north. He sensibly gave roads a wide berth but made a mistake in passing near some houses in search of water or food. His approach alerted a dog which began to bark, this barking started other dogs barking and Kolb instinctively turned and dashed towards the nearest stand of trees. He heard a voice call out in French followed by two blasts from a shotgun, the pitter-patter of shot falling through the leaves above him seemed to mock him for being such a fool.

It became clear to Kolb, as he walked and as he remembered the activity in the camp and the general disinterest displayed in him by the French that something was brewing here, the French seemed to be preparing for a push. If this was the case then they were sure to hunt him with vigour and determination, the realisation startled Kolb and he doubled his pace, trotting where he could safely see open ground in order to travel as far as possible. As Kolb blundered through the dark French countryside the sky began to lighten, the glow of dawn illuminated the eastern horizon and also illuminated Kolb's complete ineptitude in astro navigation, he had not been following Polaris at all, he'd been chasing Venus! Kolb's efforts had carried him in a wide arc around the camp and he was now further from the lines than he was when he started! The realisation sunk it's clammy claws into Kolb's gut and he felt the exertion of his efforts overtake him, he made his way to yet another stand of French trees and sank to the grass in exhaustion and frustration. Kolb knew it was hopeless, he couldn't hide with all the activity in the area and he had no uniform, no papers, no French, no food and no water. He might as well try to fly home on sheer willpower as persist in this folly. As Kolb sat beneath the Birches in which he had taken cover the glow of dawn grew brighter, a light mist began to form in the fields and a vague, dun coloured shape took for in the distant corner of the field.

Kolb wouldn't need sheer willpower to fly home at all, not if he had an Eindecker.

Coincidence, providence, call it what you will had led Kolb back to his machine and, upon careful examination there didn't even appear to be anyone guarding it! The urgency of preparations for the offensive meant that all men must be employed in that regard and Kolb's machine was not of sufficient priority to the French army as to warrant even a single picket. Kolb also remembered that the Fokker's auxiliary fuel tank might still contain enough fuel to get him across the lines, the feed mechanism had been damaged by the flak shell but it was entirely possible that to may still contain fuel. All Kolb would need to do was to remove some tubing from the main tank and splice the fuel lines to bypass the damaged valve. This work was simple enough and Kolb quickly had it done. It was time to start the machine.

This was a problem that Kolb had overlooked in his rush to fix the fuel line. He somehow needed to start the machine but usually this would be done with him seated in the cockpit. This would be a difficult task, in order to get the Oberursel running Kolb would have to prime the engine and swing the prop himself but, since the Oberursel only had a rudimentary throttle, the machine would begin to roll forward on the start setting if he was not in the cockpit to pull back the throttle and blip the engine after it had burned off the prime from the startup, in all likelihood the machine would run Kolb over and escape if he couldn't get to the controls fast enough. Kolb ran through scenarios in his mind, sitting on the cowling would be too dangerous, the machine would roll forward and might toss him off like a frisky colt on a cold morning. What Kolb needed was a long piece of string.

No! he had no string.

Perhaps wire would do the job? A bracing wire!

Using the hammerhead once again Kolb worked a bracing wire free from the rigging, it would be risky flying the machine in this condition but Kolb had no choice. He secured one end to the throttle and then wound it around through the wicker seat and trailed the slack back forward over the leading edge of the wing, using the control cables as a guide so that when he pulled the wire from the front of the aircraft the tension would return the throttle to idle. Grinning like a lunatic and humming to himself Kolb primed the engine, pulling the prop through several degrees until each cylinder was primed with fuel, then the rushed to the cockpit and switched on the magnetos. As he jumped down the crack of a rifle shot rang out and a bullet whined overhead, Kolb jumped, flabbergasted and looked up to see that a group of Blue clad figures, probably his erstwhile captors, were running across the field, rifles aimed in his direction, shouting and gesticulating to him to cease and desist. Kolb, despite himself and his predicament began to laugh. He leaped from the cockpit and rushed to the front of the fokker where he swung the heavy propellor with all his might and a prayer to the gods of the air. The engine crackled, spluttered and roared into life on the first swing and Kolb yanked hard on his throttle wire to avoid being run over. The Poilius were no longer running, they were still a good distance from Kolb and had decided that while he might be able to outrun them in his Fokker, he could not outrun their bullets which they sent fizzing and whining at Kolb, their shots were wild, spanging and cracking off of his machine, Kolb scrambled aboard the Fokker, discarded the wire from around the throttle and roared into the air. He was alive, he was going home and he could not stop laughing, in hysterics now he turned the machine about and flew it directly at the Poilous, watching them scatter and dive to the ground as the wheels skimmed mere inches over their heads. A line of trees loomed up ahead, Kolb hauled back on the stick and the obedient machine soared out of danger, leaving them swaying in it's wake. The amazed Poilius were too stunned to shoot anymore, they watched as the machine wobbled and jerked off into the distance. Kolb turned in his seat and waved goodbye to them, shouting into the slipstream as he did.

"Hals und Beinbruch you poor French bastards!"



Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/23/17 12:04 PM

Ah Ha! Ace, you got me with that last story. I never suspected he would be escaping with his own craft! When he failed with his orientation I thought for sure he was going back to the internment camp. Good one!
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/24/17 02:39 AM

Hehe, thanks RW. I tried to keep the Deus Ex Machina to a minimum but it's hard to contrive an escape scenario and keep it to a reasonable length without it. Hopefully Kolb can keep his machine from landing on the wrong side of the ditch in future because the narrative is going to get increasingly bizarre otherwise.
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/24/17 03:06 AM

Originally Posted by Ace_Pilto
Hehe, thanks RW. I tried to keep the Deus Ex Machina to a minimum but it's hard to contrive an escape scenario and keep it to a reasonable length without it. Hopefully Kolb can keep his machine from landing on the wrong side of the ditch in future because the narrative is going to get increasingly bizarre otherwise.


Ah, borrowing from Greek Mythology! A classical man I see!
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/24/17 01:56 PM

Can you imagine it though? Kolb landed to be greeted by Jean-Claude and Pierre for the third time that week, they led him past the tunnel he'd dug under no man's land, past the airfield with the Nieuport he'd stolen last week and right past the camp with the prototype tank that Kolb had stowed away in on his last escape.

In other news, Kolb finally saw his first French machines, here's a teaser.

Funnily enough the encounter did leave him gliding back to earth yet again but on the right side of the lines this time.

[Linked Image]
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/26/17 11:28 AM

12,000 feet is high for a Fokker E.II.

At 12,000 feet the engine struggles to breathe, the wings run out of lift. The rudder sags and responds sulkily, requiring more and more boot to keep the aircraft pointed in a straight line. The Caudron G.4 however handles the air at high altitude with comparative ease, it's two large engines huddled in their acorn shaped nacelles provide enough thrust to take the seemingly ungainly bomber with it's crew of two to over 13,000ft. Kolb was not long into his patrol when he spotted the Caudrons, they were about 4,000ft above him and coming from the direction of Saint Quentin, presumably returning from a dawn bombing raid in the area. It was a long and slow chase, not an exhilarating rush of adrenaline but a wearing test of endurance, would Kolb be able to coax the machine high enough with his current fuel load, would he close to within firing range before the machines reached the relative safety their side of the lines and put their noses down in order to outrun him.

Minutes ticked by and the shapes of the two G.4's slowly drew nearer, Kolb began to pick out details on the hindmost machine, the lattice like tail, the head of the observer who was watching Kolb approach, waiting, as Kolb was, for the moment to fire. When he was within 300 yards Kolb began firing short bursts in an attempt to get the Caudron to turn and lose speed, he didn't expect to hit at this range but both Kobes and Laack had told him that enemy aircraft would often respond in such a way, despite not being in any particular danger, out of sheer reflex. This French pilot was made of sterner stuff however and it wasn't until Kolb had closed to 200 yards and his rounds began striking the bomber that the pilot veered into a graceful right hand turn, carrying the two merging aircraft East. They were over the lines now, Kolb could not keep up the pursuit much longer for fear of ending up stranded behind enemy lines again or having his line of retreat potentially cut off by enemy scouts. He urged his machine on, closing steadily and firing bursts as the opportunities presented themselves.

At 100 yards the enemy observer began to return fire, Kolb jinked, careful not to lose speed but needing to maneuver behind and under the tail of the G.4 in order to stay out of the observer's fire. The duel went on this way, a game of cat and mouse which the observer eventually won with an accurate burst that holed Kolb's fuel tank and forced him to turn away to the north. Kolb swore, his fuel was running out fast and he was over the wrong side of the lines. At least he had plenty of height, he would make it home. Provided nothing else went wrong. Laack's words came to him subconsciously.

"There's no problem in flying that you can't make worse Kolb."

Mindful of this advice from his departed friend Kolb considered the foolhardiness of his pursuit and the inept manner in which he had engaged the enemy. Of course Kolb didn't have many options given the circumstances but he identified his major mistake in this instance as having been too keen, too hot headed in his pursuit. The problem was that, given the relative parity of his aircraft with the Caudron, Kolb was left with precious few options so far as engaging advantageously. He would have to talk to Kobes and the others about tactics, using the sun, patrolling the right places at the right times.

"Live and learn, but live first." Kolb mused to himself as he descended. He picked a field from the myriad below and landed on it safely.
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/26/17 02:26 PM

So...Kolb preaches to himself to re-enforcing the things he should not repeat. biggrin
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/26/17 04:09 PM

He's dodged the headman's axe twice within a week. I'll have to sneak in a few sorties with him over the next couple of days.
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/30/17 05:38 AM

Weiss was from the Baltic coast, he has white blonde hair and extremely fair skin. They called him "Moonbeam" because it was jokingly stated that he could sunbathe and get a tan by the light of the full moon. Fatigue and the weather killed Weiss, windshear to be exact. He had been coming in to Vivaise after a long patrol, been careless on his approach when a gust picked up and he flew slap into a tree on the edge of the field. His comrades buried him in the cemetery at Bruyeres et Montberault. The next day Kolb went up before dawn. A warm front had moved into the area overnight and the air was turbulent and gusty. Towering stacks of cumulus and the occasional cumulonimbus cloud dotted the air as far as the eye could see and Kolb's machine bucked and thrashed about wildly. He had intended to test the rigging and perhaps catch a French night raider on his way back down south but Kolb had to cut his flight short due to the extremity of the weather and the uneasiness of his stomach. They had given Weiss a fitting send-off, the four of them that remained, even Meinecke's stiff Prussian manners had been loosened enough for him to participate in the mess games.

Werner and Klaus eyed Kolb's machine proprietarily as he taxied to the canvas hangar where he customarily parked, they could see that the rigging was already loose again in places and that their morning's work was already cut out for them.

"Bit rought up there this morning Kolb?" Asked Klaus who saw to the rigging.

"Rough? Even the ducks are landing with scrambled eggs." Stated Kolb and strode off to the mess for breakfast since he'd left a good deal of his dinner somewhere between Vivaise and Sissone.

Kolb took a quick breakfast in the mess, which was empty. No serviceable machines except for his own and only four pilots meant that the rest of the squadron got to sleep off their hangovers while Kolb, being the neophyte, had been assigned the morning's flight. After eating he returned to his quarters and slept until a Gefreiter awakened him at lunch time with the news that his machine was ready for the afternoon patrol. Feeling much more chipper now Kolb had a quick sandwich and coffee in the mess before walking out to his machine where Klaus and Werner awaited him.

"All ready?" He asked

Werner nodded. "Yes and please try to bring her back in the condition you found her."

"Of course dear Werner!" exclaimed Kolb, heaving himself aboard.

The weather had settled a little and Kolb took off from Vivaise with a minimum of fuss, the wind was still strong but nowhere near as extreme as it had been that morning and Kolb was able to climb to 6,000ft whereupon he set off towards the juncture of the Oise and the Aisne rivers where he would be patrolling today. He'd hardly made it 10 miles from Vivaise when he spotted two large, dun coloured aircraft below him making the same heading at about 4,000ft. Kolb blinked, he couldn't believe his eyes. Two Caudrons lower than him and in perfect position to attack! Kolb switched the ignition of the Oberursel engine back to the half position where it would only fire on every second stroke so that he would not gain too much speed in his attack and then he dove after the French machines. Their observers were competent as they saw him attacking and the lower of the two aircraft seemed to panic, veering out of formation, Kolb selected this machine as his target. He made several passed but the turbulence interfered with his aim, it also prevented the observer on the Caudron from bringing his gun to bear and, so, overall Kolb had the advantage as his gun was easier to aim. He made several passes at the French machine, Machine gun hammering Tak-tak-tak-tak on each pass like an absurdly grateful Pole. Pieces flew from the lumbering French machine which staggered and lurched through the rough air but, by sheer skill and the willpower of its' crew, the machine stayed aloft. Kolb would attack, break away, climb then dive to attack again but the stubborn Caudron refused to go down under the hail of his bullets. Finally, both Kolb and the Caudron crew noticed a bank of cumulus approaching. The Caudron plunged towards it with Kolb in hot pursuit. Kolb made it within range and hammered a final burst at the Caudron before the cloud swallowed them both whole.

It only took a few seconds for Kolb to lose his bearings inside the cloud entirely. he cut the engine to idle and watched his RPM gauge like a hawk, easing back on the stick if it climbed even slightly. Eventually he came out of the cloud left wing down and in a slight descending spiral. He glanced frantically around for the Caudron which was above him by about 500 ft and heading towards Vivaise. Seeing Kolb the French pilot plunged his machine back into the cloud once more, preferring the uncertainties within to the inevitable fate that would befall him before Kolb's gun. Kolb decided not to follow but to wait, circling in the area and searching for his quarry. The Caudron did not emerge again, it somehow eluded Kolb and, after waiting for some time, Kolb gave up and decided to make for the front where the French machines would have to cross in order to remain home. Kolb was exhilarated, he'd seen his rounds striking the French machine, the splinters of wood flying, canvas flapping, neat rows of holes. He'd seen the terrified faces of the two Frenchmen staring at him aghast as he bore in. This was Kolb's second taste of blood and he wanted the kill but he also knew that he had made a mistake in following the Caudron into the cloud. A cooler head would have climbed away and waited for the machine to emerge but Kolb had pursued it like a fool into the murky fog and he could very well have been killed as a result. These thoughts occupied Kolb's mind as he flew to the front along with other thoughts about which route the French would choose to take home. Kolb guessed that they would climb above the clouds, ready to duck back into their safe embrace should Kolb reappear.

Kolb made it to the lines and wheeled about at 7,000 ft, waiting for the French machines to come into sight, he circled and circled but they did not appear. 'This is hopeless' thought Kolb after some time and he decided to try looking under the clouds incase the French machines were skulking underneath. There was nothing under the clouds either, this time the mice had escaped.

Or had they?

In the distance to the north kolb spotted an observation balloon and this gave him an idea, perhaps the observer had seen or heard the French machines, perhaps he could point out to him the direction of their passage. Kolb opened his throttle wide and roared off in the direction of the balloon which he arrived at in good time to find the observer, bobbing up and down in his basket and waving lazily at him in the most frustratingly casual fashion, like one would brush away a fly. Kolb circled, gesticulation to the observer in a futile attempt to convey his inquiry about the French aircraft while the observer watched him, bemused at the peculiar spectacle.

"Obviously a complete moron." Kolb muttered under his breath and he was about to fly away home when the observer suddenly became very animated, thrusting his arm outward and pointing to the North. Kolb wheeled his machine around and, sure enough, there above the clouds was a single Caudron G.4 with flak bursting all around. Kolb climbed hard to maneuver into position for a shot. It wasn't long before he was in range, the French machine turned hard to the left but Kolb easily matched its' turn and hammered off a burst which smacked into the Caudron, sending chunks of wood and canvas flying. Kolb squeezed the trigger for a second burst but his guns were silent. No ammunition. By now the French observer was furiously firing back and Kolb broke off the attack, muttering to himself about his poor aim and watching the Caudron wing its' way south towards home.

[Linked Image]

Kolb and the Caudrons

[Linked Image]

Kolb attempts to communicate with the observation balloon.
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/30/17 02:05 PM

Ace

Very compelling story. I was totally immersed in it. Nice touch adding the tech stuff about the Oberusal ignition. I really enjoy the accurate details along with the emotional content. It's a shame to see the carrot always dangling just out of Kolb's reach!
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/30/17 02:18 PM

Thanks Rob, I try to fly the E.II according to the rules of how the engine is supposed to work. Blipping and limiting myself to full on, half on and idle settings.
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/30/17 11:34 PM

Kolb awoke to see Kobes standing over him.

"Wake up sleepy head, it's time to go flying"

"Mein gott." Muttered Kolb. "Why can't you people understand that I'm not a bat."

It was still dark outside, Cauldrons had been making regular early morning raids and the Fokker Eindeckers of KEK West were the only aircraft available int he region to intercept them. There were some Aviatiks based at Sissonne but their aircraft were busy on other duties so KEK West got the unenviable chore of ascending to 10,000ft each morning to hunt the French. Kolb went through the motions and it wasn't until he was standing before his machine with Klaus and Werner fussing over his flying kit that he truly woke up, it was a feeling of mingled fear and excitement building in his stomach.

'Perhaps today would be the day!' he mused, or 'Perhaps today would be the day...'

Kolb briefly thought of Marie, it had been a while now since he had written to her. A pang of guilt teased at him but was soon overrun by nervous excitement as the sound of a siren cut through the morning air and reached his ears. This morning he would do hid damndest to bring down one of the cursed French monstrosities.

*****

5,000ft over the trenches, the sky was full of cloud and the red glow of dawn began to peep through the gaps in the clouds from the east. Kolb had made good time to get to the lines, the air was relatively calm and a wind from the SSW gave his wings a little more bite as he climbed on his way to the Aisne where he would begin his hunt. Kolb didn't have long to wait. Ahead of him anti aircraft fire burst into the air, picking out Kolb's target for him.

"One, no two of them."

It was a long chase, the Frenchmen spotted Kolb and opened the throttles on their machines, climbing with all the power they could muster, Kolb climbed in pursuit, keeping pace with them until they reached 10,000ft where the lumbering French machines lost the climbing race and Kolb began to catch them when suddenly they turned toward the northeast. Kolb was surprised, these men were very confident in their machines. He had expected them to remain over their own lines until or to flee but these men meant to go about their business despite Kolb's presence, they were brave men. This was Kolb's first clue that he had a fight ahead of him. Kolb managed to maneuver underneath the French machines after they made their turn and he continued ahead of them, looking back over his shoulder to make sure that they had not changed course. Soon enough he was a mile or so ahead and at the same level. He turned as tightly as he dared for this height and aimed his cowling at the rearmost machine, hoping to cause such consternation in the French formation as to cause them to break up and thus allow him to attack one machine without needing to concern himself with return fire from the other. The tactic was a dangerous one, his closure speed would be high but Kolb had lost some height in his turn and it was all he could do to bring his gun to bear in time. He managed a brief burst into the number two machine before they merged and then he made a wide, climbing turn that positioned him above the pair, poised, like a hawk preparing to swoop.

Kolb focused all of his with on the second machine, allowing nothing to distract him. He watched as it grew in his gunsight, an ungainly lattice of struts, canvas, engines and men. When it seemed as though he could reach out and touch the rudder of the French machine he opened fire. Kolb's burst hit the crew compartment, a sort of bathtub type arrangement suspended between the wings and engines. The Caudron lurched, staggered through the air sideways for a bit and finally fell out of control. Kolb, watching in disbelief was aghast, what had he done? Had he killed them? He, Kolb, who calculated business earnings in a small Cologne firm? Was this a trick? Surely they must pull out! Arcs of tracer from the first machine sped over Kolb's machine, a ranging burst, Kolb ducked instinctively and veered away while attempting to see what had become of the second machine but ultimately losing sight of it. Kolb didn't know but there would be empty chairs in the French mess at Rosnay that night, his burst had killed the pilot, and wounded the observer, almost severing his arm. The observer sat, looking at the blood that was pouring from an artery sloshing in the cockpit around his feet to the ground that was spinning up to smash him to pieces. Mercifully he fainted before things got any worse for him.

There was still one French machine in the air and Kolb was confident that he could force them both down, he had plenty of ammunition and fuel and he had a better machine. The French pilot on the other hand was equally confident, he was a veteran and he'd dealt with Fokkers before. Kolb had lost a little height in evading the gunfire aimed at him after he had shot down the first G.4 and the pilot of the lead machine knew his aircraft well, leading Kolb in a climbing left hand turn that Kolb found almost impossible to follow due to the gyroscopic forces generated by his rotary engine, the thin grip his monoplane's wings had on the air at this altitude and the tiny rudder of the Fokker. The Caudron seemed to hang in the air above Kolb, ahead of his turn and just out of reach, try as he might he simply could not bring his gun to bear without nearing a stall. The only thing to do was to gain speed in order to be able to cut across the turn of the French machine, Kolb eased the nose down and let the rudder bar feel the full force of his left boot, struggling to balance the angle of bank as his aircraft plunged into a sharp turn that first descended and then ended in an ascent that placed the Caudron within reach of his Spandau machine gun. Tak-tak-tak-tak-tak-tak-tak-tak-tak the gun roared as Kolb fired a long burst into the Frenchman, seeing his hits strike all over the starboard engine and wing. Kolbs maneuver had brought him dangerously close to the machine and he cut his engine back to half, blipping to stay in position and fighting the Fokker's tendency to stall in the thin air. Kolb closed again, fired. No Tak-tak, his gun had jammed. Kolb's long burst had overheated the barrel and now the Spandau refused to chamber another round. Kolb leaned forward and struck the cocking lever, thumping the gun with his gloved fist, struggling to stay behind the French machine all the while. He inadvertently climbed while struggling with the gun, placing himself in the line of the observer's fire and a hail of lead spattered across the cowling, starring his windscreen which sent a few razor sharp fragments into Kolb's cheek. Kolb wouldn't notice until after he landed.

For minutes Kolb struggled with the gun, the Caudron, his Fokker until the reluctant Spandau finally accepted another round. Kolb felt the cocking lever slide home and he pointed his aircraft once again at the enemy. Tak-tak-tak-SPANG. Return fire smacked into his Oberursel which began making an alarming metallic clanking to accompany its' usual disharmonious buzz. Kolb fired a final defian burst and broke away to the Northeast, heading for Bruyeres, checking his fuel, RPM and the general state of his machine. The Caudron, now much the worse for wear also, was in a wide descending spiral over the front. Kolb glanced at it, hateful and pitying at the same time, conflicted between being denied his victory and the feeling of respect he couldn't suppress, they had put up a good fight. Kolb couldn't spare anymore time for the Frenchmen however, more pressing matters required his attention. The clanking racket his engine was making alerted Kolb to the fact that he had probably lost a cylinder from his engine. It was no problem, provided the leaking fuel didn't catch fire, or providing bits of connecting rod didn't find their way into another cylinder or providing the fuel and oil lines weren't completely destroyed. Apart from those factors, losing a cylinder wasn't as bad as it sounded, the engine could run one or even two cylinders short provided the others weren't compromised. Kolb would just have to be extra careful.

He nursed his machine home, switching back to half ignition when he could to give the strained Oberursel what respite he could and taking care to stick to terrain which afforded him a safe landing ground should worst come to worse. When Kolb finally arrived back at Vivaise he made a quick check of his height, picked a clear patch on the field, switched off his engine to avoid the possibility of a fire and landed heavily just past the stand of trees that still bore the scars of their encounter with Weiss. Werner and Klaus had heard the hesitant spluttering of Kolb's machine approaching and they ran to his machine to help him from the cockpit. Kolb was deathly pale, exhausted, his face spattered with blood from his superficial wound and, despite it all, he grinned at them.

He'd put a score on the board.

[Linked Image]

Kolb discovered that he was reasonably safe from return fire beneath the tail of the Caudron
Posted By: AceMedic88

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/30/17 11:42 PM

You're a fantastic writer, Ace. I'm loving these reports.
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 04/30/17 11:54 PM

Hehe, thanks Ace. It's the game that does half the work for me though to be honest.
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/01/17 01:10 PM

Thanks for that GR8 read over my morning coffee and biscotti at my fav cofee house.
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/02/17 10:12 AM

10th April, 1916.

Meinecke knew that there was something wrong the moment he heard Kolb's aircraft approaching the field.

It was a rough day, warm air was flowing in from the NNW and meeting cold air in the South from the Alps, the result was gusty conditions, scurrying cumulus and cumulonimbus clouds and severe turbulence. Meinecke knew that Kolb was an experienced pilot with almost 20 front hours but experience is not a hand to trump fate, as was well known to all who flew from Vivaise. Meinecke could tell that tt wasn't just the engine. Kolb wasn't flying with his usual relaxed ease, he was struggling. Fighting the aircraft, fighting the air, and he was losing.

"Power on you bloody fool!" Shouted Meinecke, his face taut as though he were struggling with the controls himself.

Kolb was coming down too quickly, not trusting his ragged engine Kolb had pulled back the power, thinking he had enough height to make the field but Freya had other plans for him downdrafts and gusts toyed with Kolb's Eindecker as he struggled to manhandle the machine in for landing, the trees ahead of him that had seemed far below a moment ago now loomed ahead, grasping. Kolb almost made it, he side slipped deftly between two trees but Freya reached out and plucked him from the air, sending his Fokker spinning into the ground with a sound like a giant beating his fist into the earth. Meinecke winced, poised like a watchful hawk for the first sign of fire, thankfully it never came. Meinecke shook his head and turned his back on the scene. There was no hope, Kolb was certainly dead judging by the wreckage strewn across the field and Meinecke had other things to do in order to retain what remained of his squadron.

When Werner and Klaus examined the Kolb's machine they found it riddled with bullet holes, Kolb wasn't though, Freya had mercifully snapped his neck on impact like a farmer kills a chicken.

*****

Several miles South a severely damaged Caudron met a similar fate. Two other members of the formation had seen what transpired. A lone Eindecker had attacked them, singling out the left side machine of the trio since it was struggling to maintain formation. The Fokker has isolated the Caudron and the two had fought each other but the rough weather had mastered both combatants, sparing both the Caudron and the Fokker for a few more minutes of existence. A young, square jawed and olive complexioned pilot named Hector Magnier listened to the old hands chatter about the combat. The Fokker had been very unlucky, having to fight the air currents to maintain position. On a calmer day he'd have made short work of the Caudron, the German's shooting had been precise and the French machine was badly hit in the encounter, trailing smoke and losing height all the way home but the weather had doomed the German flyer, causing him to lose position and stray into the path of the observer's machine gun which was used to good effect, driving off the German machine and bringing the French crew a temporary reprieve. The observed died in the crash, the pilot was badly injured.

Magnier's stomach felt hollow, his turn to face the Fokker scourge was growing nearer.

*****

P.S. The Story now continues with Hector Magnier who will be flying the Caudron for C.21.

P.P.S Thanks JJJ, your bloody mod got Kolb killed. Bugger you and your incredibly realistic bloody gusts and turbulence. ~S Outstanding work pal.

P.P.P.S Thanks to all of you who are following the tale, sorry for the long wait.

Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/02/17 11:19 AM

Ace, it was well worth the wait. an excellent report. I felt as though I were there listening to the tale.
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/02/17 11:25 AM

Thanks RW, I'm planning to cede my mortality to the enemy unit nearest or directly involved in my previous pilots' final moments. (If you hadn't guessed already) So this should carry on until the armistice.

So it's going to be Caudrons for me until I get Fokkered or whatever else might befall me.
Posted By: JJJ65

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/02/17 11:41 AM

Sorry to hear that, Ace_Pilto sigh .
I swear I did not have on mind to do any harm to your belowed pilot(s).
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/02/17 03:32 PM

Hey, I'm just glad someone knows how air moves in this game (sims in general) at long last. Keep up the good work mate.
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/24/17 03:00 AM

(Writer's Note: Hello everyone! I am continuing my British career [see main forum for "Geoff Williams" thread detailing my last flyer] in the Dead-is-Dead style of playing with a new pilot. Here are my rules of engagement:

1) Dead - is - Dead! I believe this can be modded, however, I'm not running the mission editor for this one, and therefore I have no backup pilots, so Dead is truly Dead for any reason. If I do die, I will be starting one day after death with a fresh, new, different named (but still British for now) pilot.

2) Flying rules set to (mostly) "historical"...the only "non-historical" setting I have is I have reduced the accuracy of rear gunners...I have read many posts that suggest this is a good idea. Also, I am going to use Bucksnort's Reduce Rear Gunnery Accuracy mod on Moderate...in my previous career (Geoff Williams) I noticed Pfalz A.I craft opening up on me (and hitting) at about 200 yards.

3) All aces included, and historical weather. I actually tend to prefer games that allow you to change history (think Hearts of Iron or Victoria series), however, based on posts, and my own experiments, I feel it will be best to go ahead and play into history as opposed to changing something I cannot (within the framework of this sim). Yes, I might shoot down Boelke six times, and in flames even, but it is more the challenge of facing pilots like him that make this fun, interesting, and challenging.

4) Controls. I will not use labels, I will not use the "z" button for stats, I will use in-flight maps for now, but I hope that I can abandon them one day, or at least clear out the green airplane cursor that tells me exactly where I am at. I will turn off the text display (shift-D) ...you know, those messages at the top of the screen when bad stuff and other stuff happens (low fuel, health, stall, etc.), but use it for bombing. Now, because of how some planes are set up, I might feel compelled to use F5 just to see the compass to get an idea of my direction, however, when I have the time, I can also use mouse-tracking to look down, or even fidget with eyepoints, to find my compass. But, with all of this said, it really doesn't matter too much, as I am not going for DiD points, but survival. I am going to do my best to survive to November 11, 1918! Flame-outs especially scare me (see poor Geoff Williams), and so do structural defects, but otherwise I feel OK about the possibilities...

5) Controls, part deux. I have an old Logitech Wingman with a left throttle control slider, and except for a trigger and top joystick button, no other programmable buttons exist! It is from another era. I may use the slider throttle in either all up or all down to simulate a blip button on rotary engines...a bit gamey, but I must admit I prefer it to trying to find the "b" button on my keyboard! duh

6) Transfers. I have found one source of an obscure pilot (Lt. Daniel Joseph Sheehan) who original flew for the RNAS in at least 1915 and perhaps 1916 before being injured. He was then allowed to transfer to the RFC and he became a trainer until being let back into combat. He became part of 66 Sqn RFC and was killed on 10 May 1917. If our WOFF:UE squadrons are accurate, it looks like he may have been flying a Pup...either way, it shows that transfers between the air services did occasionally happen, so, I am willing to judicially transfer between services if the opportunity arises. Not terribly historical, but I found one instance, so hey!

7) Game speed...I will use time compression, especially in situations that seem "safe" or "dull"....if I am going to get through a career, I feel it will be necessary to do this

OK, this is pretty much the framework, now to some background biographical information about my second British pilot, George Lyons!)...

George Lyons

[Linked Image]

From York, North Yorkshire

5 December 1883 (31 years old at time of enlistment as a pilot with the RFC)

Bit of a troublemaker in school, more of a prankster, and things had transitioned to compulsory schooling in England around the time of Lyons' childhood.

[Linked Image]

Came from a lower class family, went to school until age 13 (thanks to recent compulsory school act in England), and then did odd jobs for a few years as a teenager to help his family including selling food in the streets...

[Linked Image]

catching rats...

[Linked Image]

and for a while, a chimney sweep, although he was a bit too large for this...

[Linked Image]

Was fortunate enough to meet some young people who took an interest in billiards, and he learned how to play...very well. He became a decent professional billiards player, being able to live well enough off of his proceeds, and this took him around many parts of England and Wales.

[Linked Image]

Lyons enjoyed tinkering with things that were fast like motorcycles, and taught himself how they worked and how engines worked as well. Being a “happy bachelor” he also enjoyed a bit of drink and also women, but he balanced that with his continued passion for billiards and continued to do fairly well for himself. He eventually made his way to Southend-on-Sea was able to purchase a flat on Heygate Avenue...

[Linked Image]

and Lyons spent considerable time at the billiards tables at the Kursaal Southend amusement park (by the way, this actually came before Coney Island in the USA and is considered to be the very first theme park in the world) in the later part of the first decade of the 20th century,

[Linked Image]


...and this is where he first became acquainted with aeroplanes, seeing some of the first craft at the Rochford aerodrome in 1914, but also coming into acquaintance, by chance a few years before, with Victor Forbes and Arthur Arnold who had been testing a homemade aeroplane in the vicinity (Westbarrow Hall Farm to be exact, abutted to the place where Rochford aerodrome eventually went up).

[Linked Image]

In addition, Lyons noticed the work then being done by the “Colony of British Aircraft” just up the way in South Fambridge run by Noel Pemberton-Billing and had folks such as Frederick Handley-Page and others testing out new designs.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

Even though the “Colony” turned out to be a bit of a failure, Lyons became keenly interested in flight. Of course, this tied in well with his enjoyment of motorcycles, having owned a few including a Trusty Triumph (1912 Triumph model)

[Linked Image]

...and a 1907 Norton.

[Linked Image]

Lyons taught himself about motors and became very good at it, eventually on occasion having the chance to work with aviation motors and other aeroplane parts. Lyons' reputation spread as some one who was good with mechanics in the Southend area. In addition, Lyons had made some flights in Farman and then Blériot aircraft, part of his daring but collected nature.

[Linked Image]

Eventually, war clouds came on the horizon, and whilst not particularly inclined to join the armed services, some acquaintances convinced Lyons to join the Royal Flying Corps at their new Rochford aerodrome, where he was directly entered at the rank Air Mechanic 2nd Class (after passing the trade test) in the late summer of 1914. Excellent work helped Lyons develop a great reputation, and although he had now suspended his professional billiards career, he had banked enough quid to maintain his flat, making him someone who was unusual in the ranks, being a bit older and more world seasoned. His hand-eye coordination and natural aiming abilities (seasoned in billiards play) made him an excellent candidate for becoming a pilot, and he was encouraged to obtain his Royal Aero Club certificate 1051 which he earned in January 1915.

[Linked Image]

He then encouraged relatives take care and live in his Southend flat as he headed first to Sutton's Farm to complete his training, and then to Flanders as a part of RFC 3!

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]



(and thus, another saga begins!)

Regards,

Jeff

Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/25/17 04:21 AM

George Lyons

Training at Sutton's Farm, 19 April 1915.

Training flights...mostly uneventful, however, on my first navigation flight, I had engine failure! The thing just would not rev beyond idle, and while I did have an aerodrome in sight, I could not make it and had to glide to rest in a farm just beyond some railroad tracks (NW of London).

For my first solo flight, I took a spin above Southend to once more see the sights of where I most recently lived. There is my flat...can't you see it?

[Linked Image]

Still not too far away from where I am now, but soon, it will be just a bit harder to get back once I'm across the Channel.

[Linked Image]

I finished with 7.72 flying hours:

[Linked Image]

Got to meet some of the blokes in the squadron (Writer's Note: these amount of kills look much more reasonable than those of RNAS in March 1915 wink ):

[Linked Image]

Housed at Chocques field in Flanders flying the Morane Saulnier type L, also called the Morane Parasol...

[Linked Image]

Ready for my first mission as a pilot!
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Regards,

Jeff




Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/25/17 12:59 PM

Very well researched story Jeff and really very interesting background on your pilot. I look forward to continued reading of his exploits
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/25/17 02:30 PM

Originally Posted by Robert_Wiggins
Very well researched story Jeff and really very interesting background on your pilot. I look forward to continued reading of his exploits


Thanks Robert_Wiggins! For a while I wore a goatee, and this is my best attempt at representing an Edwardian beard hahaha

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/29/17 09:54 PM

Whew!
Was gonna post in here with some weak arse screenshots and text but you have set the narrative bar rather high sir!
Better get a gang-buster mission.
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/30/17 12:49 AM

Originally Posted by DukeIronHand
Whew!
Was gonna post in here with some weak arse screenshots and text but you have set the narrative bar rather high sir!
Better get a gang-buster mission.


Just having fun with it DukeIronHand! I like "fleshed-out" characters....if I survive enough I might tell some billiards stories wink

Since I'm doing two-a-days, I'll be posting every half of a game week...I have one more mission to go before an update. Real life has been intervening more than anticipated recently, but I am still doing my best to be steadfast.

Show us what you have Duke...WOFF:UE is so varied, and there are so many stories to tell smile

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/01/17 12:15 AM

(Writer's Note: Now borrowing carrick58's opening methodology for reports wink )

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders

First mission 19 April PM...A nasty day for my first flight with 3 RFC. The Morane Parasol handles quite a bit differently then the RAF BE2c, and takeoffs and landings are tricky. Especially getting used to blipping the engine.



Difficult to see much with the rain and clouds, but occasionally some blue sky did poke through. Uneventful otherwise....

[Linked Image]

(Writer's Note: Where in the heck is the altimeter???...I will add a HUD altimeter on occasion. I have read that it was not above air crews to add their own gauges on occasion in real life, so here is my contribution, lol)

Second mission 20 April AM...Weather still not very good. B Flight was tasked to do some artillery spotting and watching of troop movements, but it was difficult to see much of anything so high up and also with clouds. At least it did not rain.

[Linked Image]

Third mission 20 April PM...The weather did not hold; it rained. We were tasked to view enemy movements, however, it was difficult to see and, well, we did not see much of anything except clouds and rain.

[Linked Image]

2nd Lieutenant H. D. Harvey-Kelly (Note: a real life Ace in the future!) sustained some rather heavy engine damage and was forced to land, and the Bosche were sending some archie our way, but I do not believe he was hit with any of that...just some old-fashioned engine trouble. Now, "Bay" (what H.D. Harvey-Kelly is called) is an interesting fellow, and my cup of tea! Here is an "official account" of the first aeroplanes that flew over the Channel from England to France during the beginning of this war...left me laughing! (Note: from WIkipedia):

Quote
Whilst Major Burke planned to be the first to land in France, Harvey Kelly took a short-cut over some woods and landed just before him.[8] Commanding Officer Major Charles Burke wrote in his diary: "Just as I was gliding down I saw another machine. Landed at 8.22. It was Harvey Kelly."[9] The route was straightforward, however given the limited range and reliability of the aircraft it kept close to points of safety: Swingate Down, Boulogne, south hugging the coast, then east along the Somme valley to Amiens. At 06.25 on 13 August, No 2 took off led by Major Burke flying Dover - Boulogne. From Boulogne they followed the coast as planned - except for Bay, who continued inland, apparently following a pre-planned cross country route. He landed, together with Air Mechanic Harris, in Amiens at 08.20, Major Burke arrived 2 minutes later. Although understandably annoyed at the flagrant disregard for his orders Burke took it as yet another example of Bay's playfully competitive nature and nothing further was said. A fellow pilot, Archibald James, described Bay as " .... the funniest man I have ever met. He kept me in roars of laughter the whole time". It's very likely that Bay's impact on Squadron morale also came into Burke's thinking.


...and a picture having a smoke after landing (Note: rofl ) :

[Linked Image]

Fourth mission 21 April AM...Weather cleared overnight, a fine day for flying! Also, first real action as we were tasked to recce over Phalempin enemy aerodrome, but were given the go ahead to drop some bombs! Intell told us that we scored some good hits, and indeed I dropped to about 150 feet to accomplish this! However, we took some moderate machine gun fire, and while neither of our craft were hit, it was a bit harrowing. (Note: Bah, turned off computer too quickly again, so no vids or pics frown )

Fifth mission 21 April PM...I suppose our morning success spurred Command to give us a bona fide bombing mission, this time to Houplin. However, Harvey-Kelly was in the lead, and we bombed from about 6ooo feet for this mission. I decided to try a little trick; not having done much high altitude bombing (or much of any bombing for that matter), I aligned my aeroplane behind his about 200 yards, and then when I heard his bombs go, I counted to three and then released mine. Intell tells us that I actually scored some hits whilst 'Bay' did not. Still, at these heights it is probably more luck than skill, sort of like trying to pocket a ball on a billiards table, but from five tables over.



When I landed, I heard the klaxons going off at a nearby aerodrome, so I decided to take off again to see if I could find any enemy aircraft, but to no avail. I made about 1000 feet, but did not see anything or any friendly archie to guide the way.

Sixth mission 22 April AM...Command decided we should visit the Harboudin enemy aerodrome; although officially a recce mission, since I was flight leader (B flight), I requested and was granted permission to bomb. I decided for a low attack, and while successful, our aeroplane was also shot up rather well. Not too far from our field, I lost revs and decided to glide in for a landing as opposed to risking something worse. Ended well, but our craft will need at least three days of repair so the mechanics tell me.




[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]


(...the saga continues!)

---------------------------------------------

Regards,

Jeff

Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/09/17 05:49 PM

(Writer's Note: The photobucket situation threw me for a bit of a loop, but after some investigation, I have chosen imgur as the best alternative)

Seventh mission 22 April PM...second machine today that failed under me, but this time not due to enemy action. Was assigned with 'Bay' to patrol Houplin aerodrome, but this time bombs were not allowed. Probably all for the bast, as about 2 miles into enemy lines, one of my cylinders seized up, and while I still had some revs, it was not enough for me to maintain altitude, so with a wave to HK we headed back to our side of the lines. I was fearful of fire, so I turned off the engine for a while, but then after some quick calculation, I realized we would not make an aerodrome, so I turned it back on for a bit. We barely made La Gorgue, and not knowing the lay of the field I came somewhat close to some trees (looks like someone else had to force land here as well [see video]), but all is well that ends well. The mechanics told me it was a blown cylinder...sounded like it (Writer's Note: I do not know much about rotary engines, so this will have to do, lol)! Caught a ride back to Chocques and ready for the next day. I hear they took the motor out of that plane and replaced it for now.



Eighth mission 23 April AM...Beautiful day for flying! And an absolutely uneventful mission. As a matter of fact, I have not once seen any other aeroplane in the sky other than our flights.

Ninth mission 23 April PM...More good flying weather. Based on the recent successes of our bombing missions, Command decided on an attempt to bomb front line positions. Sometimes, I am willing to risk a low level bombing of an aerodrome, but low level trench bombing is nothing short of suicide by my estimation, especially as a leader of B flight with three aeroplanes. My observer, and one of the leaders of the squadron Captain Reinar has instructed me not to be so rash, so we kept it to the letter and bombed from about 7ooo feet, hitting absolutely nothing and adding a few more craters to the landscape. However, a mission with no mishaps is always a good mission!

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

Tenth mission 24 April AM...An “art obs” mission, attempting to direct our artillery where to shoot. Weather holding nicely, but communication with ground leaves a lot to be desired. I should mention, this is the first time I have seen other aeroplanes that our not part of our flight. I believe they were French Moranes, and they were far away. They seemed to be heading away from us, but I had to stay in formation and eventually lost them in the distance.

[Linked Image]

Eleventh mission 24 April PM...Command has seemingly considered our bombing missions a success, so we once again were sent out to bomb, this time the front lines again. 'Bay' was leading us, and he scored the only hits (according to intell). Weather, and machines, holding nicely.

[Linked Image]

Twelfth mission 25 April AM...Another “art obs” mission with 'Bay' as lead for B flight. Got there, 'Bay' saw what he needed, got back. (Writer's Note: No pics somehow, but uneventful)

Thirteenth mission 25 April PM... A bona fide bombing mission, this time to Harboudin once again. Lieutenant Jack Alwin (fine chap) lead our flight today, and he choose a high altitude strike. Intell surveyed the situation later and reported that our bombs had hit some sheds...good show! But then, my engine failed to hold revs (once again), and we had to glide over the lines. Fortunately, I found a good spot to land, just inside of our front lines. Always fearful of enemy artillery smashing us to bits with a landing so close to the lines, Captain Reinard and I scrambled out of there into the relative safety of a thicket a few hundred yards away. So now three failed machines in only a few days time, with two of them going for no good reason...makes me think I should consider working on my own engines to make sure they are in tip top shape!

(Writer's Note: current stats at end of last video)



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

(...the saga continues!)

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/18/17 09:31 PM

Fourteenth mission Monday 26 April AM...Another “art obs” over the lines near La Gorgue...a misty morning, and rather difficult to make things out on the ground, but otherwise uneventful.

[Linked Image]

Fifteenth mission Monday 26 April PM...A short mission to bomb the front lines just to the east of Loos, led by 'Bay'. We did not score any hits, and all flew back uneventfully. (no pics :/)

Sixteenth mission Tuesday 27 April AM...'Bay' was our B flight leader, and we were tasked to bomb the Harboudin aerodrome once again. The wind was gusty today, and I experienced a rather nasty stall that I did not recover from until after losing about 3ooo feet. I had to circle around a bit and get into position, but I managed to drop my bombs not long after 'Bay' dropped his.



Intell says we both scored hits.

[Linked Image]

I then gained some altitude as archie was a bit fierce, and then headed back for home. The winds were coming out of the west, so it was a bit of a challenge, but Captain Ben Halifax (good chap) and I (as his "chauffeur") made it, as I have been assigned to Captain Halifax (Captain Reinard is on well-deserved leave). (Writer's Note: after gaining some height, I decided to use “level flying autopilot” and realized a sobering thought: the level AI cannot handle flying the Morane L, especially in the wind [and maybe with JJJ65's awesome roll mod that I am using]. I lost altitude all the way west, to the point where I had to take the controls to maintain height. I really like that actually, because I have to pay attention!)

Seventeenth mission Tuesday 27 April PM...'Bay' and I once again piloted our aeroplanes for a bombing mission, this time over the front lines. No hits according to Intell. Also, I was denied leave...I could use some rest!

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

(...the saga continues!)

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/20/17 02:55 PM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
April 1915

Eighteenth mission Wednesday 28 April AM...An “art obs” mission to the front nearest our aerodrome. Uneventful, except is seems Jack Alwin's plane (our B flight leader) was having trouble getting to altitude, and our first pass by the front we were only at 4ooo feet. We circled back towards Loos and then made another pass at about 55oo feet, a little more of a safe height. (Writer's Note: No pictures or video, because I had taken the W10 creator's update and wanted to see if I could run WOFF:UE in regular W10 mode [instead of Windows 7 compatibility mode]. Program runs fine, however, my video capture program did not capture any of the action, just the pre and post screens. I did a quick test back in W7 compatibility mode, and video of the action was captured well...and also, I will now be writing a report for each mission as this suits my schedule a bit better)

[Linked Image]

-------------

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/20/17 07:59 PM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
April 1915

Nineteenth mission Friday April 30 AM...I was given a 48 hour pass! Went into Loos...not a whole lot going on there.

[Linked Image]

Came back for our mission; not a bad day for flying, with haze and low clouds.

[Linked Image]

...assigned with 'Bay' to bomb the front lines, without result.

[Linked Image]

Captain Reinard seems to have chosen 'Bay' as his pilot, while I have now been assigned to Captain Halifax for the near term.

[Linked Image]

-------------------------------------------------------

Regards,

Jeff


Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/22/17 04:51 AM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
April 1915

Twentieth mission Friday April 30 PM...A sad day for our squadron: 2nd Lieutenants Jem McAully and Todd Stanley were killed today as their aeroplane burned out. I noticed their plane leave the flight (led by 'Bay' and Reinard),

[Linked Image]

and it looked like they landed well, however, they must have been on fire and I could not see it. Our recce flight went over the lines and made our patrol not knowing their fate. On the way back, I spotted what I thought were two Aviatik crates

[Linked Image]

...however, they were two of ours upon further inspection.

[Linked Image]

Our hearts are heavy for Jem and Todd. They are the first, and hopefully last, deaths for our squadron since I arrived. A dreary way to enter May.

------------

Regards,

Jeff

Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/23/17 06:32 PM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

Twenty-first mission Saturday May 1 AM...Our squad is still in grieving for the loss of our mates, but the war goes on.

[Linked Image]

An 'art obs' to the front with 'Bay', uneventful.

[Linked Image]

----------

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: BuckeyeBob

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/23/17 08:47 PM

Things are likely to pick up - eventually! Thanks for the report.
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/23/17 09:39 PM

@ Buckeyebob....ha ha, yeah, it is likely be quite a while actually, mechanical failures notwithstanding! That is OK...I've read more than a few stories about pilots who started early, made it into 1917 or 1918, only to be eventually shot down. I believe Harvey-Kelly was one of those too, which, by the way, even though WOFF:UE has him as an "Historical Ace", I do not believe he shot down five planes. Still good to see him in the game for his historical significance (I never would have put it together he was the first Brit to land in France in WWI) nonetheless.

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/23/17 11:50 PM

(Writer's Note: in response to last post, I should also mention that I am biding my time, hoping not to get killed, seeing how many missions/hours I need to get promoted, and then one day hope to be the highest rank so I may transfer to where I choose with what aeroplanes I choose...I could do this by selecting these options at the beginning of a career, but what fun would that be? wink )

Twenty-second mission Saturday May 1 PM...We led B Flight today over the front lines for some recce. Fairly quiet, and uneventful. (Writer's Note: a good pic of BuckeyeBob's great clouds!)

[Linked Image]

(...oops, I meant this one! wink )

[Linked Image]

Here are my stats up until now:

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

------------------------

Regards,

Jeff

P.S. Just noticed that my status was changed to "rookie"....hmm, I wonder what that is about, lol?
Posted By: BuckeyeBob

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/24/17 06:08 PM

In that first pic, you are right in the thick of the soup!

I am glad that you like using the cloud mod and that more and more people are integrating the weather into their after action reports!
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/24/17 06:21 PM

@ BuckeyeBob....sure thing! I especially like the low cloud effect...looks a bit like smoke coming off of a battlefield at times

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: BuckeyeBob

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/24/17 06:35 PM

Yeah, it would be cool if I could figure out how to get that particular cloud effect at a particular place on the map or battlefield!

I know there is a setting for either "battle raging" or "all quiet on the western front." There are also files that contain the longitude and latitude of the front at various points in the war. I think there is also a setting that controls whether you see gas on the battlefield. If only I could combine this information and merge it into the DynamicWeather file. Hmmm.....
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/25/17 03:18 AM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

(Note: A two-fer!)

Twenty-third mission Sunday May 2 AM...My first bombing mission in a few days, this time to Houplin. Intell says we had a smashing success! (Note: airfield mod really adds much! smile )



My trick seems to work, lining up straight behind the flight leader. This will not work when I am the flight leader!

Twenty-fourth mission Sunday May 2 PM...Another bombing mission, this time to the front lines just east of Loos once again. This was a rare three crate flight, but none of us made any substantial damage to the entrenchments. Much more difficult to bomb the front lines.

[Linked Image]

(Note: and now for some attempts at his-res pics like Fullofit and many others...)

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

...I noticed a new type of aeroplane in front of the hangars...looked like a single seater.

[Linked Image]

--------------------------------------

Regards,

Jeff



Posted By: JJJ65

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/25/17 05:44 AM

Thanks, Jeff, for your reports. Great reading thumbsup .
Posted By: Adger

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/25/17 01:16 PM

Originally Posted by JJJ65
Thanks, Jeff, for your reports. Great reading thumbsup .


Agree with you totally Triple J. Fantastic shots and reports Jeff.
I don't have a great deal of Time to fly much but when I do grab 5 I always look at your reports thumbsup
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/27/17 03:10 AM

@ JJJ65 and Adger...thanks for the encouragement! biggrin

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

Twenty-fifth mission Monday May 3 AM...A bombing run to Douai this time, a new place for me. We were the B flight leader, and after discussions, we decided to go in low. Intell says our plane scored many hits, however, upon returning from the enemy side, Sgt Bill Falkland and Captain Reinard crash landed at a friendly field. They were OK, but their plane was completely destroyed.

[Linked Image]



-------

Regards,

Jeff

Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/27/17 07:24 PM

Call me crazy, but I love the Morane. It has such a good field of fire and even though it is slow as molasses, it is a stable and steady plane.
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/28/17 01:29 AM

Originally Posted by Banjoman
Call me crazy, but I love the Morane. It has such a good field of fire and even though it is slow as molasses, it is a stable and steady plane.


Yeah, and I'm hoping they don't burn out as much as the BE2c! Fun to fly though, and reminds me of an ultralight.
pilot

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/28/17 01:32 AM

I don't remember that many engine problems.
Posted By: CaptSopwith

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/28/17 02:50 PM

Really fantastic reports, Jeff! Just spent a good little while this morning reading through them. I'll have to fire up an early-war British campaign!

Cheers!
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/30/17 03:33 PM

@ CaptSopwith....glad you are enjoying the reports! Flying in 1915 is quite different than later times, but I am looking forward to the "Fokker Scourge" just to see what happens (other than losing my own head of course wink )

------------------------------

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

(Note: A three-fer!)

Twenty-sixth mission Monday 3 May PM...An art obs to the front lines near our aerodrome, led by Alwin and Reinard. Low haze and clouds made things difficult,

[Linked Image]

but Captain Reinard dropped a bag (Writer's Note: A message bag with a streamer attached, kind of like this one shown below)

[Linked Image]

and hopefully they got the message as to where to aim their shot.

Twenty-seventh mission Tuesday 4 May AM...A bombing mission to Bertincourt; Command must think we are doing a good job as we are being sent to aerodromes farther and farther away from our home base! Intell says we scored some hits.



The enemy airplanes had an interesting paint scheme that made it difficult to see from the air, but we could tell where they were, and following 'Bay' and Reinard, our bombs scored.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

Twenty-eighth mission Tuesday 4 May PM...A recce mission to the front near our 'drome. The ground haze has cleared, and visibility was good. Uneventful.

[Linked Image]

----------------------------

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: Pooch

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/30/17 04:23 PM

Born in 1883. That would make him 32. A bit of an oldster compared to the other lads, isn't he? I figure career soldier. Cavalry maybe. Transfered to the air service just before the baloon went up. Sent over to France with the first bunch to go in 1914. I would take that "Rookie" out of there, though. At 32 and still a rookie Sergeant...well....we hope our boy has been a better soldier than that.
Wait a minute! I just noticed his date of enlistment. April 1915. So one month after joining up, the old codger is not only a Sergeant, he's graduated flight school, been posted to a squadron, and is already flying combat missions. Hmmm..........
Good screenies, however.
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/30/17 05:38 PM

Originally Posted by Pooch
Born in 1883. That would make him 32. A bit of an oldster compared to the other lads, isn't he? I figure career soldier. Cavalry maybe. Transfered to the air service just before the baloon went up. Sent over to France with the first bunch to go in 1914. I would take that "Rookie" out of there, though. At 32 and still a rookie Sergeant...well....we hope our boy has been a better soldier than that.
Wait a minute! I just noticed his date of enlistment. April 1915. So one month after joining up, the old codger is not only a Sergeant, he's graduated flight school, been posted to a squadron, and is already flying combat missions. Hmmm..........
Good screenies, however.



Pooch

Consider the following, and they were'nt the only ones over 30:
Oblt. Friedrich Christiansen
*12 December 1879
1918 he was 38 years old

Lt.Jakob Wolff. At the outbreak of war he was 46 years old. He served with Jasta 17 in 1916 and 1917 and achieved 4 victories before he was WIA on 27 Jul 1917.

What about Boehme? having scored 24 victories and beeing born on July 1879?
On the Allied side, wasn't Mannock well over his thirties? Propably not the oldest but respectively well known.
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/30/17 05:49 PM

@ Pooch....glad you have taken fancy to my pilot! smile

Mr. Lyons is still 31 (December 5th birthday) and basically fell under this category: "...direct entry to the service was permitted, primarily in order to obtain a sufficient quantity of trained mechanics. By the end of the war the vast majority of RFC men were direct entry." (stolen from http://www.airhistory.org.uk/rfc/people.html). I have him gaining a good amount of knowledge from messing around with motorcycles, but also hanging around some other characters in the Southend area, and a little less from the “Colony of British Aircraft” just up the way in South Fambridge...he took his "trade test" in late summer 1914 (check page 24 of this thread), so he was actually 30 when he enlisted (WOFF only shows when he becomes a pilot [however, JJJ65's pilot log editor might change this!])....and this:

[Linked Image]

(stolen from WIkipedia)

....but you are absolutely correct in that he is an "oldster" for sure compared to pretty much all of his digital squad mates (I think one was born in 1886). He took the RAC cert in January of 1915 because he was encouraged to by superiors (hey, that's my story wink )...yes, definitely moved up the ranks pretty quick, and maybe some resentment among his colleagues, but (lol) here he is wink

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/30/17 05:51 PM

Originally Posted by Robert_Wiggins
Originally Posted by Pooch
Born in 1883. That would make him 32. A bit of an oldster compared to the other lads, isn't he? I figure career soldier. Cavalry maybe. Transfered to the air service just before the baloon went up. Sent over to France with the first bunch to go in 1914. I would take that "Rookie" out of there, though. At 32 and still a rookie Sergeant...well....we hope our boy has been a better soldier than that.
Wait a minute! I just noticed his date of enlistment. April 1915. So one month after joining up, the old codger is not only a Sergeant, he's graduated flight school, been posted to a squadron, and is already flying combat missions. Hmmm..........
Good screenies, however.



Pooch

Consider the following, and they were'nt the only ones over 30:
Oblt. Friedrich Christiansen
*12 December 1879
1918 he was 38 years old

Lt.Jakob Wolff. At the outbreak of war he was 46 years old. He served with Jasta 17 in 1916 and 1917 and achieved 4 victories before he was WIA on 27 Jul 1917.

What about Boehme? having scored 24 victories and beeing born on July 1879?
On the Allied side, wasn't Mannock well over his thirties? Propably not the oldest but respectively well known.


Ha ha, yes Robert_Wiggins, I was thinking about old Jakob Wolff...he was my current age at the outbreak of war, but definitely an outlier....IIRC, Manfred von R said he was a fine fellow, but just too damned old biggrin

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: Pooch

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/30/17 07:40 PM

Ah....I should have read the entire post before commenting. I have a bad habit of doing that. I see that you already have your man's background thoroughly thought out. Well done. So much for my cavalry idea. Hope he makes it long enough to make it back to home and blighty but, well...we're all aware of the odds against it I'm afraid.
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/01/17 02:26 AM

Originally Posted by Pooch
Ah....I should have read the entire post before commenting. I have a bad habit of doing that. I see that you already have your man's background thoroughly thought out. Well done. So much for my cavalry idea. Hope he makes it long enough to make it back to home and blighty but, well...we're all aware of the odds against it I'm afraid.


Yes, odds not too good, for any pilot really. Best hope of survival might be injury beyond repair (like amputation...I always remember that graphic from Red Baron 3D). I do have more traditional ways of entering service in mind for next pilot careers (if needed), but then again, every life story has interesting points, eh? And I really have no idea of actual history of WWI pilots, only what I find on the internet....you could call me "fullofit jr." biggrin

-------------------

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

Twenty-ninth mission Wednesday 5 May AM...an art obs to the front with 'Bay' and Reinard. Weather was dubious at takeoff with rain, however the rain stopped and it wasn't half bad, except for not being able to see the ground all that well.

[Linked Image]

Nonetheless, Reinard dropped a bag and we headed home.

-------------------------

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/02/17 04:01 PM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

Thirtieth mission Wednesday 5 May PM...a recce mission over Haubourdin and Phalempin. Weather poor, with thunder and lightning (Note: using Panama Red's lightning mod)!

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

As bad as the weather was, I believe I understand why we were sent. Both aerodromes had what appeared to be new kinds of monoplanes in front of their hangars. A biplane of some sort was also landing at Phalempin, but that was second fiddle.

[Linked Image]

Indeed, the archie was rather fierce, even up at 65oo feet where we were at, and in a rainstorm nonetheless.

---------------------------------------

Regards,

Jeff

Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/03/17 09:17 PM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

Thirty-first mission Thursday 6 May AM...a recce mission with 'Bay' and Reinard over the front. On and off rain, but some glorious views, and also some terrific wind.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

...we made it back without incident.

----------------------------------------

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/03/17 09:52 PM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

Thirty-second mission Thursday 6 May PM...another recce mission, but with three aeroplanes. Captain Halifax tells me that we will start to see more of these three plane flights as time goes on. The weather was poor (Writer's Note: haven't had any time off due to poor weather as of yet), but yet we slog on.

[Linked Image]

Everyone made it back without incident.

------------------------------------

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/04/17 05:02 AM

There will be a lot of "Slogging on" flying the Morane, I hope you have a good book to read. There's also a lot of "Holding on" if the weather is rough and you had a big breakfast. A few times I found myself in the position of wanting to scrub a mission because the weather was just too rough and dangerous. You really get the early war feeling where even the weather can kill you.
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/04/17 05:04 AM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

(Note: a two-fer!)

Thirty-third mission Friday 7 May AM...an art obs mission to the front just to the north-east of Arras.

[Linked Image]

Captain Reinard noticed some stuff and dropped a couple bags for the artillery men on the ground.

[Linked Image]

Thirty-fourth mission Friday 7 May PM...a bombing mission to the front with 'Bay'. He scored some hits, I did not.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

-----------------------------------------------

Regards,

Jeff

Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/04/17 05:08 AM

Originally Posted by Ace_Pilto
There will be a lot of "Slogging on" flying the Morane, I hope you have a good book to read. There's also a lot of "Holding on" if the weather is rough and you had a big breakfast. A few times I found myself in the position of wanting to scrub a mission because the weather was just too rough and dangerous. You really get the early war feeling where even the weather can kill you.


Chuckle....yeah, I actually do read some books on occasion when I have auto pilot on, but ones I can put down right away...and adding JJJ65's roll mod makes things even more interesting concerning "holding on"! I (and even AI flight leaders) have struggled to gain altitude in some situations, but burnouts (knock on wood) have been much less than with the BE2c career....good flying to you!

PS, I enjoy your videos....they often come up on youtube autoload right after mine thumbsup

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/05/17 11:39 PM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

(Note: a two-fer!)

Thirty-fifth mission Saturday 8 May AM...another art obs just to the east of Loos. Mission went well, with better weather.

[Linked Image]

Thirty-sixth mission Saturday 8 May PM...a bombing mission to the front near where our art obs was earlier today. No hits were scored, however, Captain Halifax noticed an aeroplane heading east about 5oo feet below us. It had no markings that we noticed, however, after some investigation later at base (Note: in other words, checking out the 'skins' file lol), we were told that some of the French squadrons do not have roundels on their top wings, nor their tails.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

It was a bit harrowing for a moment as it could have been a Pfalz (Note: during the war, Pfalz built licensed versions of the Morane L!), but it all ended well, except no hits on the Bosche. Lastly, we landed at our base allright, but 'Bay' landed a bit close to a tree...he heard about it!

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]
--------------------------------------------

The saga continues!

Regards,

Jeff

PS, I'm now having an issue with my screen recorder as the audio is out of sync with the video....am looking to fix it.

EDIT: And, after spending about an hour yesterday evening to no avail, today I remembered reading the Geforce Experience has video capture...tried it and it works great! Also it has a screen frame capture (for pictures as opposed to video) and that is great too! Small issue of popups happening during flying, but I think better than being out of sync!
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/06/17 03:12 AM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

Thirty-seventh mission Sunday 9 May AM...a fairly routine recce mission to Haubourdin and Phalempin. A nice takeoff and good flying weather with some low clouds.



(Note: takeoff views an homage to Robert_Wiggins smile )

Only moderate archie, and those new monoplanes were not present.

[Linked Image]

It seems 'Bay' and Reinard's crate was having issues keeping altitude as we drooped to around 45oo feet as we crossed the front, but we made it back.

---------------------------

Regards,

Jeff

Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/06/17 01:11 PM

Very nice video Jeff. I see you gave serious Justice to the views of the dromes and the wonderful WOFF clouds.

You may want to start thinking about getting some serious armament soon. It won't be long before those Fokker make their presence felt!!
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/06/17 02:16 PM

Originally Posted by Robert_Wiggins
Very nice video Jeff. I see you gave serious Justice to the views of the dromes and the wonderful WOFF clouds.

You may want to start thinking about getting some serious armament soon. It won't be long before those Fokker make their presence felt!!


Thanks Robert_Wiggins!

Alas, Command will not let me put my own forward firing gun on my aeroplane for fear I will shoot off my own propeller (real version: alas, I do not know how to mod a WOFF:UE Morane L to add a forward firing gun biggrin ...actually, it shouldn't all that difficult, as the Pfalz E.III was a close copy of the A.II, which itself was a "beefed up" copy of the Morane L, and WOFF:UE has the Pfalz E.III; but I've not flown one (or against one) to know if it has a forward firing gun....I'll have to check on that today!)

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/06/17 02:25 PM

Originally Posted by stljeffbb
Originally Posted by Robert_Wiggins
Very nice video Jeff. I see you gave serious Justice to the views of the dromes and the wonderful WOFF clouds.

You may want to start thinking about getting some serious armament soon. It won't be long before those Fokker make their presence felt!!


Thanks Robert_Wiggins!

Alas, Command will not let me put my own forward firing gun on my aeroplane for fear I will shoot off my own propeller (real version: alas, I do not know how to mod a WOFF:UE Morane L to add a forward firing gun biggrin ...actually, it shouldn't all that difficult, as the Pfalz E.III was a close copy of the A.II, which itself was a "beefed up" copy of the Morane L, and WOFF:UE has the Pfalz E.III; but I've not flown one (or against one) to know if it has a forward firing gun....I'll have to check on that today!)

Regards,

Jeff



If it works, then all you would need is a new allied skin.
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/06/17 08:36 PM

Originally Posted by Robert_Wiggins

If it works, then all you would need is a new allied skin.


Well, I'll be....it worked quite well by my estimation; better than I thought it would! The only real concern for me is that I can see the pilot's goggles from inside the cockpit the way I usually sit (all "[" and all "cntl-enter" possible), but this is a fairly easy adjustment with the eyepoints....good enough for base ball!



I have not used the mission editor at all, so a question I have (and will investigate): Can a British player use German planes? Of course, it happened in real life, especially with the Germans using captured French and British planes semi-regularly.

Another question I will find the answer to: How many Morane L craft used forward firing machine guns? Did the British have and use them? So many questions, lol

...and that poor Bosche wingman didn't have a chance! And I got a stern warning too, never to destroy my wingmen again rofl

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/06/17 09:39 PM

Way to go Jeff!! But I really think you need to find a head tracking device. Once you try one you will never go back.
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/06/17 10:17 PM

Originally Posted by Robert_Wiggins
Way to go Jeff!! But I really think you need to find a head tracking device. Once you try one you will never go back.


I actually like the mouse tracking for some reason...but I do have to figure out how to get rid of the cursor....just found out that cursor elimination in games is NOT native to Nvidia Geforce recording.

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/07/17 01:42 AM

Ha ha, well, I solved the mouse issue by creating a tiny black dot for a cursor...of course, it can be a bit difficult to navigate around the menu screens, but it is about the size of an in game fly (or smaller)...nothing like workarounds wink ...ask Hawker and Strange about that biggrin

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/07/17 04:03 AM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

Thirty-eighth mission Sunday 9 May PM...a bombing mission to the front with 'Bay' to the east of Loos

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

...he scored a few, Intell says I scored none.

[Linked Image]

-------------------------------------

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/07/17 09:01 PM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

Thirty-ninth mission Monday 10 May AM...a recce mission to the Houplin aerodrome. Nothing much happening there, however, on the way back, we happened upon a burning Hun Aviatik aeroplane flying back over the lines to their side of things. Not sure the physical state of the pilot, but the amount we viewed them they seemed to be fairly in control of their burning up crate.



Of course, I decided not to give chase because those poor bastards were about to burn up anyway, and 'Bay' and Reinard were not following him either. This was the first enemy aircraft I have seen in the air since the start of my flying career.

-----------------------------

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/08/17 04:38 AM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

(Note: a four-fer!)

Fortieth mission Monday 10 May PM...a recce mission to the front just southeast of the ruins of what was once the town of Arras. Fairly uneventful.

[Linked Image]

Forty-first mission Tuesday 11 May AM...an art obs with Lt. Ken Breton at the helm of Captain Reinard's machine this time. But our crate was not to make the destination, as first there was some spluttering at 21oo feet, and then next thing petrol was on the windshield

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

...fortunately, we were right above Merville aerodrome, and we glided down to a landing after I shut the engine off to avoid a fire.

Forty-second mission Tuesday 11 May PM...after catching a ride back to Chocques and the ack emmas getting together one of the reserves for me to fly, I was back up doing another art obs mission just to the east of Loos. Great visibility and high clouds and no threats made for a nice flight.

[Linked Image]

Forty-third mission Wednesday 12 May AM...a three crate mission to bomb our colleagues at Houplin! We breezed in so quickly that they seemed to not notice us coming! No archie until we were done bombing and almost out of range...even the klaxons were late to sound! Hope the Bosche always sleep late; it would certainly help this war go more quickly.



[Linked Image]

...for once, 'Bay' didn't score, and the new guys got most of the hits.


------------

Regards,

Jeff

Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/08/17 12:31 PM

Jeff you are getting lots of flying time in thumbsup
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/08/17 04:47 PM

@ Robert_Wiggins....yes, well I do use a lot of time compression, and that helps to speed things along. Once the flying gets fast and furious (kind of like what you are experiencing!), I will not be able to get as many flights in.

-------

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

Forty-fourth mission Wednesday 12 May PM...aktion! What shaped up to be a routine recce mission over the area southeast of Loos became a heart-pounder as I spied two crates heading over the lines...and this time they were Bosche! Of course, we have all heard of the exploits of PĂ©goud and then Garros from the French side of things. In addition, Intell has told us that the Aviatik B-type do not have regular armament, just the occasional rifle that has been shown to be wildly ineffective. So, we fought! They probably did not notice us at first, and they were headed southwest, not at full revs (most likely a recce mission of their own); we managed to catch up to them. Not having practiced this sort of flying much before, I decided to get in front of and below them to give Halifax a good shot.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

...he did, and then I heard some whizzing and crumpling of fabric! Did they have a gun after all?!? No, I think that Halifax actually hit our own craft (we will keep that one a secret to this record), or perhaps Reinard in the other plane hit us? Either way, once the shooting commenced, the Huns headed back for their side of the lines. They were now at full throttle, and also being a bit more dangerous to fight them over their side, we let them go. Based on what Halifax and Reinard said, they both got some hits in, but not enough to cause major damage to the enemy, and ultimately this meeting was a draw. Meanwhile, our craft took “moderate damage” and will be in the shop for two days...time for another reserve.



----------------------------------------------------

The saga continues!

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/08/17 11:33 PM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

Forty-fifth mission Thursday 13 May AM...A glorious morning to lay some eggs on Douai!

[Linked Image]

...and indeed 'Bay' and I did, so says Intell. As a matter of fact, they had some of those new monoplanes out on the field that I managed to hit

[Linked Image]

(Note: I know, not the 'super-best' pic, but it shows the visceral carnage! wink )

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

...while 'Bay' started some fires to their structures, all in all a good show!

[Linked Image]



--------------------

Regards,

Jeff

Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/09/17 04:24 AM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

Forty-sixth mission Thursday 13 May PM...still good flying weather, although the wind picked up a bit. A recce mission to the southeast of Loos once again that was fairly uneventful, save for the moment we chanced upon a craft headed east. Turns out it was one of ours, although a bit unusual to see just a single aeroplane. Perhaps dropping off or picking up a spy?

[Linked Image]

------------------

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/13/17 05:06 AM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

Forty-seventh mission Friday 14 May AM...Bombing, and then action! A bombing mission to the front at one of our usual places just to the southeast of Loos. Just after the bombing was completed (and I had a delayed release of the bombs, perhaps because of a kink in the release wire), I viewed what I believed to be another Morane L-type heading towards the east. I could not confirm that, and then just about a minute later, I witnessed a biplane heading west...this one an Aviatik B-type! Once I got close enough to confirm, another one appeared. I broke formation to attack, and while I did receive a bit of a dressing down once I arrived back at base, I was also given congratulations as our action managed to drive both Bosche craft back over the lines. This time, Halifax expended over 2oo rounds, but with little success

[Linked Image]

...then we got caught in a rather large cloud and lost about 5oo feet before righting ourselves and losing the prey. Once this happened, I caught a bearing and realized we were a fair bit over the lines. I then decided to head back to base with inconclusiveness being the order of this flight, as our bombing also resulted in zero hits according to Intell.

----------------

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/13/17 07:59 PM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

Forty-eighth mission Friday 14 May PM...a routine recce to the northeast of Loos. Uneventful, except it seems we were not over the front for very long.

Here is a view of our takeoff:

[Linked Image]

------------------------------------

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/14/17 12:10 AM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

...as 15 May came, I was granted a 48-hour pass! Having planned this for the last three weeks (since my last pass to Loos was a dud), I hit the sights of Paris!

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

I then made it back to base in the early morning hours of 17 May, catching only a few hours sleep. Upon awakening and heading to the duty room, the message was posted “due to poor weather, all flights canceled for 48 hours”

[Linked Image]

...so back to bed I went! Indeed, the skies opened up and it rained for two days straight, so much so that on 19 May, flights were canceled again, but only until 20 May. I have been at this more than a month now, and I must say that the pace is grueling and exhilarating at the same time.

Forty-ninth mission Thursday 20 May AM....I was a bit concerned about being a bit “rusty” after not flying for five days, and today was certainly a day to be aware! Perhaps all of the air services felt the need to get back out in to the air at the same time, because I have never seen the skies busier than I saw them on this mission. 'Bay', Simmons, and I (with our respective Officers) were given a bombing mission to the front lines just east of the River Lys and a bit west of the occupied town of Lille. The runway was soggy but we managed to get in the air without incident. As we reached altitude and headed towards the lines, two crates appeared in front of us. These were BE2s and seemed to be headed back to a friendly aerodrome.

[Linked Image]

Then right before we bombed the enemy front, two other planes appeared, and these were Bosche! Aviatik B-types!

[Linked Image]

However, after my dressing down from the last time I broke ranks (which even Halifax gave the go ahead, but I was too eager), and especially carrying bombs, I stuck right to formation and let the Huns go. Then, after we bombed, two more Aviatik appeared!

[Linked Image]

I wasn't sure if they were the same ones we saw earlier (probably were), but either way, 'Bay' and Reinard in their lead crate did not go after them; at some point, they got close enough for observer 2nd Lieutenant Jeffrey Alden (fine chap!) to shoot a few rounds at them with no discernible result however, we maintained formation all the way to base. It seems to me, since we have some of the best and most armed aeroplanes in the skies, we should be going after our enemies when the situation presents itself, and I will do this when I am flight leader and I get permission from the observer/leader. However, when I am not leader, I will from now on not deviate from the formation unless we come under attack, and attack from the sky is not likely based on reconnaissance showing only one or two squadrons of Pfalz A.I in our area (these are copies of the Morane L we fly). If we only had a Vickers Gunbus at our disposal (Note: wink ), although I hear they are rather ungainly, but at least they have a forward firing gun that could give us an advantage in the skies.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

-------------------------

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/14/17 10:46 PM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

Fiftieth mission Thursday 20 May PM...we were cleared to bomb the factory at Perenchies just to the west of Lille. However, only our aeroplane made the target as we got lost in the clouds and then separated.

[Linked Image]

It also seems that 'Bay' and Reinard's crate could not drop their eggs! They had to land with bombs on the rack, always harrowing. Ours dropped and hit nothing, although Intell says we were not too far away. Also, this particular factory has already been rather devastated, but it was revealed that there was an archie post there.



---------------------------

The saga continues!

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/15/17 09:00 PM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

Fifty-first mission Friday 21 May AM...a routine recce mission over a familiar spot just east of Loos, but not without a bit of trouble. Our plane was the leader (Captain Halifax as usual), and the other plane had Captain Reinard as observer with a different pilot, Lloyd Cromwell. 'Oily' as we call him is a bit fidgety but gets the job done.

[Linked Image]

Nonetheless, as we were over the front, I noticed that he was a fair bit lower than we were,

[Linked Image]

...and getting lower.

[Linked Image]

After pointing this out to Halifax, he gave the go ahead to head back to base as we did not want to strand them over the front or worse. Upon arrival, Cromwell and Reinard explained that their aeroplane was just sluggish for some unknown reason...perhaps the engine needs an overhaul? (Note: WOFF:UE is great to simulate situations that are outside of tight flying formations!)

--------------------------------

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: CaptSopwith

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/16/17 01:25 AM

Jeff,

These reports are fantastic. Can't tell you how much I've enjoyed reading them and how much I'm looking forward to getting in some flight time myself - it's far overdue. I hope to be posting in the boards again in short order.

Cheers!
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/18/17 05:59 AM

@CaptSopwith...thanks much for your kind words.....now get out there and get some flight time in! wink

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

Fifty-second mission Friday 21 May PM...we were tasked to bomb the Phalempin aerodrome for the afternoon flight. The weather turned on us, and while there were peeks of blue on occasion, there was also thunder and lightning.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

Lieutenant Ken Breton was piloting Reinard's craft, and Halifax and I followed right behind him as is my bombing trick. This time, not so many hits, but enough to damage one of their headquarter buildings.

[Linked Image]

Moderate archie, and made it back without incident.

---------------------------------------

Regards,

Jeff

P.S. Lyons is still my main pilot, but I have started a DiD Centenary pilot over at that forum...he will be my "fun" pilot wink
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/20/17 01:50 AM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

(Writre's note: a two-fer, and my DiD campaign is a bit stalled waiting for the calendar to catch up)

Fifty-third mission Saturday 22 May AM...A bombing mission to one of our usual spots, the front lines east of Loos.

[Linked Image]

Still haven't managed to score any hits on the Bosche installations at the front.

[Linked Image]

Also, we were what I considered to be a bit low at only 5ooo feet (Writer's note: actual WOFF:UE assignment), but fortunately no machine gun fire nor archie to speak of. Ah yes, and then just as we were landing, a splat of petrol landed on my windshield! Ack emmas tell me that a fuel line had become severed (again), but it was an easy fix and there would be no need for extended maintenance on our machine.

[Linked Image]

Fifty-fourth mission Saturday 22 May PM...an art obs with 'Bay' and Reinard leading the way, and Halifax in our bus of course. We tried a new formation, I guess it could best be called an in-line formation, where I followed right behind 'Bay' and his machine, however, a couple times we got a little too close to one another, and we will likely go back to chevron style, except for bombing when right over a target.

[Linked Image]

Otherwise, Reinard saw some targets and dropped a couple of bags, and we headed home.

--------------------------------------

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/20/17 03:59 AM

(Writer's Note: ha, my schedule opened up a bit more this evening, so I accomplished two more missions!)

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

Fifty-fifth mission Sunday 23 May AM...a bombing mission to Houplin that was not to be for our crate...not too far east of Merville, our engine started clanging like the Dickens...of course, we had eggs on the rack! I heard of an unfortunate incident that happened to some poor blokes over at Escadrille MS 12...they landed with eggs on the rack after engine failure, and their bombs went off and blew them and their bus to pieces! So, we were close to the River Lys, therefore I flew over it, checked to do my best not to hit anyone on or near the river (Writer's Note: ha, there is NO ONE around except for airbases and the front, lol), and dropped my bombs into it with a mighty explosion and splash ensuing. We then made Merville and said a quick hello to the chaps of 2 RFC, many of whom we have met before.



Our crate was hauled into the shop, and we caught a ride back to Chocques.

[Linked Image]

Fifty-sixth mission Sunday 23 May PM...our regular crate will be in the shop for a few days, so we hopped in a reserve Morane for our next mission, a bombing of the front southeast of Loos. I still have not got the knack of it, and neither we or our mates (Sgt. Bill Falkland and Captain Reinard) scored any hits.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

---------------------------

The saga continues!

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/20/17 05:00 AM

Good Lord, man! You have fifty five missions in on a Parasol?!? I think I did 20+ ish once before I was *miraculously* transferred to scouts! I found them to be surprisingly survivable, but I'm not sure I would describe the experience as fun...
salute
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/20/17 06:10 AM

Originally Posted by Rick_Rawlings
Good Lord, man! You have fifty five missions in on a Parasol?!? I think I did 20+ ish once before I was *miraculously* transferred to scouts! I found them to be surprisingly survivable, but I'm not sure I would describe the experience as fun...
salute


Ha ha, fifty-six!

Also, I've been combing over the DiD Centenary thread, and I noticed the user Kuroken had at one point at least 173 missions on a Morane! Link: 173 missions on a Morane L!

It is "fun" in its own way to me...still can't bomb the front lines with any luck, and I've had a few engine failures, but not as many issues as I had with the BE2...not only that, but the 'Fokker Scourge' is about to begin! popcorn

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/20/17 06:44 AM

Hmm, in my scans of the DiD Centenary thread, I found a post by lederhosen about "Temporary Gentlemen" ..

I'm debating how I will handle this if and when I get promoted. It takes much time off from flying....here is a quote from a website about the many roles of teachers in the great war:
Quote
During the Great War 247,061 commissions were granted in the British Army. Some 100,000 of these went to men with OTC experience gained in the Public Schools and universities. High attrition rates, however, meant that demand for officers soon outstripped supply. From January 1916 new Officer Cadet Battalions (OCB) were formed. These provided a four month course for ex-rankers, many of whom were men of working and lower-middle class origins. New officers were granted commissions for the duration of the war. The Temporary Officers were often referred to as 'Temporary Gentlemen'. This became a term of derision for those who were not from the 'quality' classes.
http://www.ww1schools.com/temporary-gentlemen.html

Mr. Lyons is from a lower class origin...on the one hand, it will speed me along to a time when single-seaters are in the air, but on the other hand, I will miss out on what I have been savoring with this campaign...what it was like to witness the changing of flying during 1915. Hmm, I will have to decide, but not right now. I'm leaning towards fudging it for the sake of fun, and can make up some outlandish story about it all wink

Also, @ Rick_Rawlings, it looks like kuroken may have had as many as 282 missions in the Morane L! Also, fullofit had a lot on a Morane, too, so it seems.....

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/20/17 10:14 AM

Somebody give this guy a Barmy WoFFer badge.

56 Parasol sorties indeed.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/20/17 01:41 PM

Originally Posted by stljeffbb


Also, @ Rick_Rawlings, it looks like kuroken may have had as many as 282 missions in the Morane L! Also, fullofit had a lot on a Morane, too, so it seems.....

Regards,

Jeff


Yikes!!! explode
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/20/17 03:17 PM

@ Ace_Pilto...aww, shucks...I don't think I deserve a badge quite yet wink I did find this thread: http://simhq.com/forum/ubbthreads.php/topics/4276528/1 ...are they still selling them?

Concerning my Morane L flying...yes indeed, some squadrons flew these things until 1917! As a matter of fact, my current unit (3 RFC) flew them in WOFF:UE until..... 9 October 1917! jawdrop and then overnight they switched to Camels on 10 October (and also went from recce to fighter in that span as well)...

Now, the FE2a is coming very soon near a neighborhood near me, and I'm thinking of transfer except I do not have the rank to fly them.

I wish that I could fly in a bit more of a realistic way, however, real-life keeps me very busy. I use a lot of time compression and I still use a map to get around much of the time. I have been lazy and have not found in the files how to disable the cursor on the inflight map, but I do not use labels, and unless I'm the flight leader I intend on staying in formation and doing my bit. I only turn on the messaging when I am bombing (to make sure that I have the bombs loaded) and then I turn it off when I remember to, etc. etc. etc.

This simulation can be tweaked even more to reflect real life...thanks to other's postings on the subject, I see that engine failure is reflected in an .xml file, easy stuff to mod. I see over at Sandbagger's mod page that Oldhat created a "hardcore mod" that I should check out. Lastly in my asking the simple question "who flew the most missions in WWI", it seems there is not an easy answer but it led me to William Barker who's Wikipedia page says he flew over "900 combat hours in 2 /12 years"! jawdrop jawdrop

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/20/17 03:50 PM

Originally Posted by stljeffbb
@ Ace_Pilto...aww, shucks...I don't think I deserve a badge quite yet wink I did find this thread: http://simhq.com/forum/ubbthreads.php/topics/4276528/1 ...are they still selling them?

Concerning my Morane L flying...yes indeed, some squadrons flew these things until 1917! As a matter of fact, my current unit (3 RFC) flew them in WOFF:UE until..... 9 October 1917! jawdrop and then overnight they switched to Camels on 10 October (and also went from recce to fighter in that span as well)...

Now, the FE2a is coming very soon near a neighborhood near me, and I'm thinking of transfer except I do not have the rank to fly them.

I wish that I could fly in a bit more of a realistic way, however, real-life keeps me very busy. I use a lot of time compression and I still use a map to get around much of the time. I have been lazy and have not found in the files how to disable the cursor on the inflight map, but I do not use labels, and unless I'm the flight leader I intend on staying in formation and doing my bit. I only turn on the messaging when I am bombing (to make sure that I have the bombs loaded) and then I turn it off when I remember to, etc. etc. etc.

This simulation can be tweaked even more to reflect real life...thanks to other's postings on the subject, I see that engine failure is reflected in an .xml file, easy stuff to mod. I see over at Sandbagger's mod page that Oldhat created a "hardcore mod" that I should check out. Lastly in my asking the simple question "who flew the most missions in WWI", it seems there is not an easy answer but it led me to William Barker who's Wikipedia page says he flew over "900 combat hours in 2 /12 years"! jawdrop jawdrop

Regards,

Jeff



You are definitely a candidate for the BWOC badge! I do believe that RAF_Louvert has a stache of them. You could send him a PM but be aware he is currently dealing with the death of his brother and so may not be able to respond for awhile.
I for one, really appreciate all your reports and enthusiasm.
Posted By: Banjoman

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/20/17 06:51 PM

My British DID pilot had 133 missions in a Morane. In WOFF, it is the dominant plane until the E.I and E.II arrives.

Edit: I don't want to be a killjoy, but I went back and checked and Ken started on B.E. 2cs and flew those for a month or two, so in reality, he didn't fly 173 missions in a Morane.
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/21/17 05:03 AM

@ Banjoman...wow, 133....yes you speak from experience! Indeed, as you say, the Morane L one of the most used and better planes of the era...until outclassed by others!

@ Robert_Wiggins... I'm happy that you think of me as a candidate for a BWOC badge (http://simhq.com/forum/ubbthreads.php/topics/4123820/1) I will be researching this thread with reckless abandon to be sure I qualify....starts with a dodo...I'm probably already close! And I'm glad you enjoy my material... biggrin you are an inspiration as well kind sir salute

OK, now for some research news! Dezh taught me about the book RAF Squadrons: A Comprehensive Record of the Movement and Equipment of All RAF Squadrons and Their Antecedents Since 1912 and I picked one up. This book shows 3 RFC using the Morane L from December 1914 until September 1915, then being replaced by the Morane LA (a version of the L fitted with ailerons!) until January 1917.

Interestingly, 3 RFC also received some Morane N aircraft in October 1915 until July 1916, and then some Morane BB aircraft from December 1915 until December 1916...any news on those modded Morane Ns? Of course the 'N' was a scout (fighter) while the BB was a biplane observer with the gunner in the back seat.

Lastly, 3 RFC received Nieuport 16 aircraft in May 1916, but then the line item for their exit only shows "( 16)" which may or may not indicate that they had them until the end of 1916, but perhaps evidence is inconclusive?

Ha ha, they were even still flying Bleriot XI type craft until June 1915! I noticed at some point they also had at least one Bristol Scout and at least one SE2. Anyhoo, I might need to start thinking about using the mission editor to include a bit more variety of plane-ige to the squadrons I fly with...and ha ha I did notice that Bleriot in the Centenary thread: http://simhq.com/forum/ubbthreads.php/topics/4128279/re-did-centenary-challenge#Post4128279

OK, now to the report:

-----------------------------

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

Fifty-seventh mission Monday 24 May AM...a bombing of the front lines again to the east of Loos, and no luck once again. Ruins my percentages these runs to the front do.

[Linked Image]

Fifty-eighth mission Monday 24 May PM...an art obs with the usual crew: 'Bay' and Reinard in one crate, and myself and Halifax in ours. It had some points of interest: first, as we were passing over Merville, a BE2 from 2RFC was exploding as they were readying for takeoff. I've heard bad things about that style of bus, and I'm glad we fly the 'L' which seems to be a bit more reliable. I hope everyone escaped without injury!

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

Then as we approached the front, a lone Aviatik headed opposite our direction.

[Linked Image]

If we were the flight leader, we would have gone after it, however, Reinard decided to stick to the mission, dropped some bags, and then we headed home long after we lost sight of the Hun.

---------------

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/24/17 04:31 AM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

---------------------------

Fifty-ninth mission Tuesday 25 May AM...an art obs with the usual crew once again. A great day for flying with white puffy clouds.

[Linked Image]

Reinard took some notes, dropped a couple bags, and we headed home without incident.

Sixtieth mission Tuesday 25 May PM...this was going to be a bombing mission to the front, however, as it turns out, both of our crates were having issues, so we dropped our eggs in the River Lys (once again) and made it back without incident. (Writer's note...this was the first RTB crash I've had since starting a career. I've had them in some other instances with test pilots...this target was a new place that I'd not been to before, oh well)

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

---------

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/25/17 10:29 PM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

Sixty-first mission Wednesday 26 May AM...a bombing of the front east of Loos with the usual crew. Intell informed me that I scored a single hit, a first for my bombing of the front lines. I lined up just behind 'Bay' and Reinard, but this time laid my eggs almost exactly when I heard the spinners of their bombs.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

Sixty-second mission Wednesday 26 May PM...another egg-laying mission, this time scheduled to Phalempin, but it almost ended in disaster! At about 8oo feet, my bus suddenly lost all revs and started descending towards Earth! I was over a field and didn't have much time to see if there were people or animals, and I decided to lay my eggs right there...I was able to land in a fenced-in area, just avoiding a collision. Halifax was relieved that we made it down in one piece, but the ack-emmas tell us that engine is beyond repair, with extensive damage to the fuselage near the engine compartment on both sides (Writer's Note: insert favorite half-engine-destroying ailment here!).

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]



(Another Writer's Note...this happened while at 12x...probably the closest "going west" experience with Mr. Lyons so far, as I finally took control of the craft at about 4oo feet, so only 3oo feet off the ground!)
-----------------------------

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: CaptSopwith

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/29/17 03:46 PM

A Short Life in the Royal Flying Corps

It is with a heavy heart that we announce the loss of our newest and perhaps, ablest pilot in months, 2nd Lt. David Crutchfield.

[Linked Image]

Crutchfield had trained extensively in England and, after much of the bloodletting in April of this year, was one of the first of a new crop of pilots who had been spared Bloody April's carnage. He was an able airmen, a crack shot, and spent hours working on his SE5, which he nicknamed "Maria." His first few missions were spectacular, and he showed great leadership potential within this esteemed and established outfit. A few days before his death, Crutchfield led B-Flight well behind enemy lines in pursuit of a flight of Albatros scouts. He attacked the Boche with gusto and even knocked one of the German airmen out of the sky right over his own airfield - giving 2nd Lt. Crutchfield his only confirmed victory.

[Linked Image]

He completed just six sorties in his time with us. Bishop is particularly rattled by Crutchfield's death, which he called "a bloody waste." The details of Crutchfield's death are unclear. He flew as part of a larger patrol that morning, and attacked a flight of German two-seaters where, it can only be assumed that his SE5 was hit, as he disengaged and immediately headed for home, something uncharacteristic for him.

Our home field reports that Crutchfield appeared high over the aerodrome with his engine off. He turned and began to lose speed and altitude, however, his angle of attack was entirely too high. Presumably he was struggling with the controls and the particularly strong headwinds that afternoon.

[Linked Image]

As he came in to the field, it was apparent that his airspeed was far too great - likely near 90mph as his wheels touched down. The SE raced by at an alarmingly high rate of speed as Crutchfield desperately attempted to yaw the machine back and forth to bleed off speed. He soon ran out of runway and hurtled headlong at a nearby fence on the edge of the adjacent farmland. The SE slammed into the obstacle at a high rate of speed and flipped over. The machine then burst into flames.

By the time ground crew reached him, Crutchfield was found crushed in the cockpit and burned beyond recognition. It was a horrific and desperately tragic end to a promising career in 60 Squadron. We send our deepest condolences to his family at this time...

[Linked Image]



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Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 08/29/17 08:15 PM

@ CaptSopwith....good to see you in the mix! Sorry your pilot went west so soon.....great paint job! I look forward to your next pilot. thumbsup

Real life has been keeping me very busy lately....hope to get back into the vitural cockpit today or tomorrow....my hours need updating over on the DiD board too!

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/02/17 03:46 AM

@ everyone....well, real life caught up to me this past week....lots of deadlines for work, my 5-yr-old son started kindergarten, got a bit ill, and other fun stuff!

But, I finally found some time to fly! biggrin

-------------------------------------

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

Sixty-third mission Thursday 27 May AM...a bombing mission to the front just east of Loos once again. I laid my eggs too early, but 'Bay' scored a couple hits.

[Linked Image]

Sixty-fourth mission Thursday 27 May PM...an three crate art obs to the northeast of Loos. Captain Reinard flew with Lt. Ken Breton while 'Bay' flew 2nd Lt. Jeffrey Alden. The first pass had no result, but we swung back around, Reinard dropped some bags, and we headed home.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

-------------------------------------

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/02/17 03:17 PM

good pics guys
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/02/17 03:23 PM

Originally Posted by carrick58
good pics guys


Thanks carrick58! By the way, you could always migrate your Morane DiD career over to this thread...also I believe Dutch is flying a Morane career....a different kind of fun! wink

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/03/17 03:57 AM

George Lyons
Sergeant
3 RFC
Chocques, Flanders
May 1915

(Writer's Note: A two-fer!)

Sixty-fifth mission Friday 28 May AM...the usual crew ('Bay' and Reinard in one crate, me and Halifax in the other) to a usual spot on an art obs mission east of Loos. Weather was dicey, but the rain held off.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

Got to the front after flying between two walls of clouds,

[Linked Image]

...Reinard dropped some bags, and we headed home.

Sixty-sixth mission Friday 28 PM...I guess they did not get enough information the first time as they sent us back to the exact same spot as they did in the morning just east of Loos. Weather was not as bad, but this time, both our machines struggled in the heavy air, and at times we were only about 4ooo feet above the front!

[Linked Image]

I'm a bit surprised we were not fired on, but we both made it out. Also, the path we took was a bit unusual heading to and from the front, and we needed a second pass to make it happen. Still, Reinard dropped some bags, and I hope the poor chaps on the ground were able to use the information to get the Bosche artillery.

-----------------------

The saga continues!

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/06/17 11:40 PM

Thanks Jeff, I did switch over to here because a career earlier than 1917 was out of sync over at Challenge.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/06/17 11:52 PM

Dubois de Marseille
Sous Lt. Esc 15
Savy, Flanders.

Jan 5 1916.


2 Sec, 3 N-10's, was assigned to Patrol Arras sector. While making a finale turn , we spotted the Boche machines 2 Aviatik types. My section leader Turin was the 1st one to fire and it looked like both a/c were knocked down . His a/c afire it fell burning from 1000 meters to the earth. I attacked the other machine firing a drum then pulled off to reload. My Wing mate attacked, but His gun must have jammed so I went in again. I gave zee kerman both drums as I slowed then Stalled into a spin. Recovering , we joined up and RTB.

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Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/07/17 07:00 PM

Originally Posted by carrick58
Dubois de Marseille
Sous Lt. Esc 15
Savy, Flanders.

Jan 5 1916.


2 Sec, 3 N-10's, was assigned to Patrol Arras sector. While making a finale turn , we spotted the Boche machines 2 Aviatik types. My section leader Turin was the 1st one to fire and it looked like both a/c were knocked down . His a/c afire it fell burning from 1000 meters to the earth. I attacked the other machine firing a drum then pulled off to reload. My Wing mate attacked, but His gun must have jammed so I went in again. I gave zee kerman both drums as I slowed then Stalled into a spin. Recovering , we joined up and RTB.


Good stuff carrick58! I personally enjoy flying the N10, pretty much just messing with it right now. thumbsup

Regards,

Jeff
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/07/17 09:10 PM

a very stable gun compared to the N-11 lots of fun but no diving
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/07/17 09:26 PM

Dubois de Marseille
Sous Lt. Esc 15
Savy, Flanders.


Jan 7, 1917. Rain coming in tomorrow so caught a ride into the city with the Croissant and Wine Dolly .

https://giphy.com/gifs/silent-film-KRaEkQk3IYiGc/fullscreen

to watch the Games.

https://giphy.com/gifs/soccer-fight-S5VYiyxAz7kwU/fullscreen
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/07/17 09:46 PM

Originally Posted by carrick58
Dubois de Marseille
Sous Lt. Esc 15
Savy, Flanders.


Sep 7, 1917. Rain coming in tomorrow so caught a ride into the city with the Croissant and Wine Dolly .

https://giphy.com/gifs/silent-film-KRaEkQk3IYiGc/fullscreen

to watch the Games.

https://giphy.com/gifs/soccer-fight-S5VYiyxAz7kwU/fullscreen


He He....good ones and rare finds at that!
Posted By: stljeffbb

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/07/17 09:51 PM

Originally Posted by Robert_Wiggins
Originally Posted by carrick58
Dubois de Marseille
Sous Lt. Esc 15
Savy, Flanders.


Sep 7, 1917. Rain coming in tomorrow so caught a ride into the city with the Croissant and Wine Dolly .

https://giphy.com/gifs/silent-film-KRaEkQk3IYiGc/fullscreen

to watch the Games.

https://giphy.com/gifs/soccer-fight-S5VYiyxAz7kwU/fullscreen


He He....good ones and rare finds at that!


Ouch to that second one!
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/08/17 03:47 AM

I actually wonder how long it took Clara Bow to Lace up those boots.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/08/17 05:13 AM

Dubois de Marseille
Sous Lt. Esc 15
Savy, Flanders.

Jan 8, 1917.

While in the city, I took in the fights although it wasnt great

https://giphy.com/gifs/boxing-6MSlNnVNHMwYE/fullscreen
Posted By: Robert_Wiggins

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/08/17 01:07 PM

Ah Carrick, you found another good one!
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/08/17 08:59 PM

Thanks guys.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/08/17 09:02 PM

Dubois de Marseille
Sous Lt. Esc 15
Savy, Flanders.


Jan 10, 1916.

Aerodrome Security Flight. 2 Section of 3 N-10's flew the assignment at 1200 Meters under broken dark cloud cover. No Contact.

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Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/09/17 04:05 PM

Dubois de Marseille
Sous Lt. Esc 15
Savy, Flanders.

Jan 11, 1916.

2 Patrols no contact.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/10/17 05:09 PM

Dubois de Marseille
Sous Lt. Esc 15
Savy, Flanders.
1 Balloon Confirmed.


Jan 12, 1916.

Glorious day. 2 Section + 1 a/c for High Cover mixed it up with a Boche Balloon. Everyone was shooting and Rocketing at the same time. I couldn't tell who was doing what, but when the smoked cleared the Bag was mine.

On the second flight , I went up solo around the lines at Loos and found some game. I made 2 passes at a 2 seat machine firing off a full Drum then pulled up and leveled off to reload. The Boche a/c dove and scooted for home. Reloaded , I called it a day and headed back since by then the Hun was deep on the enemy side of the lines.

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Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/11/17 03:52 PM

Dubois de Marseille
Sous Lt. Esc 15
Savy, Flanders.
1 Balloon Confirmed.


Jan 13, 1916.

Aerodrome Security Flight at Arras no contact.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/12/17 01:59 AM

Dubois de Marseille
Sous Lt. Esc 15
Savy, Flanders.
1 Confirmed.


Jan 14, 1916.


Nearly got the chop today. My sections 3 a/c +1 Cover machine was over the lines near Fricourt when we spotted 3 e/a at a lower altitude. As we swung around to dive we got bounced by 2-3 a/c. The enemy Scouts just went through us then they were gone. Our cover a/c is missing so we assume a KIA.
I never got off a shot although we did turn and chase them.

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Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/12/17 04:12 PM

Dubois de Marseille
Sous Lt. Esc 15
Savy, Flanders.
1 Confirmed.


15 Jan 1916.

I led 2 Section 3 a/c + 2 a/c as high cover on an Escort Mission. We met up with a Fe over the lines and flew on to Photograph the Lens Factory Area then RTB Spotted many dots near target area but no attacks.

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Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/13/17 05:37 PM

Dubois de Marseille
Sous Lt. Esc 15
Savy, Flanders.
1 Confirmed.


16 Jan 1916.

Chastening 2 seaters today. I was assigned as back up a/c to an Escort flight. Broke off at the lines at loos and went hunting. Spotted and persued 3 Recon types at high altitude got off 1 drum full then they just flew away from me. No hits , No luck. RTB Upon landing noticed another flight taking with our new N-11's BeBe's.

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Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/14/17 09:09 PM

Dubois de Marseille
Sous Lt. Esc 15
Savy, Flanders.

2 Kills confirmed

17 Jan 1916.

2 Section destroyed a balloon near Lens. as we reformed, I spotted 2 E-IIs up against the cloud base. I peeled off and pursued. One e/a turned to fire and much turning and firing , I got a few shots into his motor or fuel because his motor stopped. I watched as he went down on his side of the lines making a Hard landing. Confirmed by my flight leader. The intell people said it was a Fokker E-II. I must learn to shoot better used all my 3 drums of ammo and it was just lucky hits to nail him.

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Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/16/17 02:43 AM

Dubois de Marseille
Sous Lt. Esc 15
Savy, Flanders.
2 Kills

Caught a ride into the city for some time off . Ended up going to the fights.


https://giphy.com/gifs/style-will-boxing-KLyJFqqs6D2Ao/fullscreen

The second fight was much better.

https://giphy.com/gifs/ronda-rousey-zHhFw71QaeSrK/fullscreen
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/18/17 02:22 AM

Dubois de Marseille
Sous Lt. Esc 15
Savy, Flanders.
2 Kills

Jan 18th: A washout . No compression in motor after take off. Landed

Jan 19th: The flight of 9 a/c was led by Captanie Raymond to take out a Balloon. Being Tail end charlie in a slower machine , made me the last one over the take area. Added my rockets to the mess below then got jumped by 2 Fokkers while forming up. My wing mate got one the other I banged around with till the drum was empty. I guess, he got tired of my chandells, loops and turns because he went home. Finally, I could reload ,but he was too far away to re-engage

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Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/18/17 05:07 PM

Dubois de Marseille
Sous Lt. Esc 15
Savy, Flanders.
2 Kills


Jan 19th

After coming off a Railyard attack, I spotted an e/a. The 2 Seat machine appeared to be headed home and at low altitude. I made 3 passes at that Boche with a full Drum of 47 rds each time. He did not go down just flew away home after his gunner put 5 holes in the wing and 2 in my N-10;s Tail.

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Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/20/17 04:29 PM

Dubois de Marseille
Sous Lt. Esc 15
Savy, Flanders.

2 Kills

27 Jan 1916.

Finally, the weather cleared. Off on another Rail attack, 2 Section's 5 a/c were attacked by Fokkers ( 2 of them) lots of shots going off, But I couldnt get in position before everyone was going for the deck. RTB. We had 1 a/c missing,but both Fokkers got away.

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Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/21/17 03:04 AM

Afternoon. Assigned a N-11 BeBe. Twitchy type of Machine for a Scout a little faster maybe, but not completely stable . Went ahead and painted the Badge of the city of Marseille on the side.

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Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/22/17 02:44 AM

Dubois de Marseille
Sous Lt. Esc 15
Savy, Flanders.

Jan 28, 1916.

Hopped over to the Enemy Aerodrome at Houplin across from Loos. I left 2 drums there shooting at a 2 seat type. I cant say anything about damage there as we only had Machine guns. 1 of out 5 a/c was reported as missing.

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Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/22/17 03:35 AM

Mess at the Esc 15.

I was wondering about our Wine and Croissant Dolly. I hadnt seen her around .

https://giphy.com/gifs/clara-bow-Z7mF88CJIRETm/fullscreen

Some said she went more towards the Rear Areas because its less active area.

https://giphy.com/gifs/wings-clara-bow-NOWI6ZZl0Ac3m/fullscreen
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/24/17 07:48 PM

Dubois de Marseille
Sous Lt. Esc 15
Savy, Flanders.

2 Kills

Jan 29, 1916.

Patrol: No contact
Escort for 2 Be2's : No contact

Jan 30th

Went down town to Douai Aerodrome. They hung the last Rockets on my plane so I unloaded over the enemy sheds. The Esc lost 2 machines and pilots that day. I saw 1 of them just dive into the airfield parking ramp. The other enemy fire got him.


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Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/02/17 02:09 AM

Dubois de Marseille
Sous Lt. Esc 15
Savy, Flanders.


11 Feb 1916.

The Esc is up to full of planes and pilots so its back to ops. We have been doing unit training ( close and unguarded ) against enemy Balloons and Aerodromes but no Bosche a/c have been seen.



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Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 10/07/17 02:07 AM

Dubois de Marseille
Sous Lt. Esc 15
Savy, Flanders.
2 Victorys


17 Feb 1916.

3 Missions in the past few days No e/a sighted.

Afternoon Escort: Mixed it up with 3 Fokkers. I took 3 hits and was the only one of our 3 machines damaged. The Boche lost 1 a/c. I fired off 44 rds but no hits. Too Far away ? Total a/c involved 7.

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Posted By: lederhosen

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/16/17 11:59 AM

Introducing Capt. Blighty.
Since it seems that I can use JJJ's mission editor, I decided to make Capt.Blighty and his Be2c (HD) with 10 RFC as the only scout in the Squadron.

Chin Chin.

[Linked Image]
Posted By: ARUP

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 11/23/17 12:45 AM

RFC pilots talking in the mess hall. Horace- we had a fair scrap this morning. Hendrick- no doubt, bloody loco scrap, Huns about everywhere. William- thick as flies on a wet paddy! Arnold didn't seems to mind, though. Horace- funny you mention that. Queer chap, that Hoyt (Arnold Hoyt). He never says a word, damn good at blasting Huns and their baggage, cool as a newly appointed Vestal Virgin and never... never makes a claim. William- I saw him flame two balloons after shooting up a rail yard. He doesn't waste ammo! Hendrick- trenchies reported two Albi downed the other day. I know it was Hoyt... had to be. We were to meet up with a Harry Tate but he went off for a bit of aerial R and R. That's what he called it when the CO reprimanded him. Came back to us, though, before we crossed the lines to successfully finish the junket. Giles (eavesdropping)- Hoyt is a cracker! We were to burn a big fat sausage. Hoyt 'targeted' it and sent us on our way. I was his wingie but he sent me off. He yanked his SE off toward an airfield and knocked down some Pfalz while they were trying to land. I know because when I got there two smoking holes were in the runway and I know I saw a fireball falling. I asked him later how many he got and he said he doesn't know how to count! I put in some paperwork for him but he wouldn't sign off on it. Horace- I saw him take on five Green Tails! William- really? Giles- those Green Tails are a tough lot. How'd he go about it? Horace- he dove straight in! Sent one limping home just like that (snaps fingers)! He pulls up in a... a... LOOP... for cripes sakes! Does it again. We four in the flight were pretty amazed and just watched like slack-jawed Cockneys! After a minute or two the Green Tails had enough and flew off. Hoyt didn't have a hole in his machine and had ammo left. Crikey... he can handle his bus! The mess mates sit and stare, shaking their heads...
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 12/06/17 11:32 PM

some where over the Lines

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Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 12/06/17 11:34 PM

Sgt Peter Blood with 54 Sq.

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Posted By: ARUP

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 01/03/18 05:17 AM

S! My guy survived slogging it through for over 100 missions flying Pfalz in Jasta 10 only to die in a midair with a crummy SPAD VII over the SPAD's field just as they took off on his first mission with a Fokker D-VII... bummer. : ( Oh, how he waited and waited for the new Fokkers!
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 01/07/18 12:38 AM

Reactions to ARUP 's Pilot loss:


https://giphy.com/gifs/omg-surprised-shaq-xUOxeW0wEoZRivhlMA/fullscreen

https://giphy.com/gifs/omg-one-Rl0LGy61Sg2YM/fullscreen
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 01/07/18 01:13 AM

Somewhere over France

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Posted By: ARUP

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 01/09/18 01:24 AM

Thanks for your empathy, carrick58. LOL I think that's pretty much the reaction I had when that SPAD suddenly appeared. I actually ducked while playing when that SPAD popped into view! Tell me that isn't an 'immersion moment'! I sure wish we could command Zeppelins!
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 01/09/18 03:23 PM

No problem, the immersion is what I love about the game, besides the support from the developers and players. Ive had the Moment a few times, Ie, Trees, Mid-airs, The worst was when I placed it on auto got up for the phone and came back to find my 100 hr pilot in a smoking heap. Oh well, thats WOFF. Zeppelins now that's an interesting idea ? to put on the wish list.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 01/17/18 09:56 PM

Some where over France

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Posted By: ARUP

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 02/14/18 02:57 AM

An article in a local newspaper: 'Ltn. Ian McCoogle was welcomed home by his family in Scotland after successfully completing a two year tour that only ended because of the Armistice. He was wounded twice and had numerous forced landings. He triumphed over 28 adversaries in over 150 engagements and rose through the ranks to become an able and well respected flight leader. He flew 'Pups' and 'Camels'. His plans for the future are unknown but whatever is chosen we wish him the best!'
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/12/18 04:55 AM

Been a long time...
Man, it's been months...
A dawn patrol to the east of Loos turned up a small flight of Albatros scouts that were reluctant to engage with our superior numbers. As I bumbled around with one of them, I lost him in the ground clutter (a too common occurrence) but was able to pick up another scout from a different squadron who was all too ready to play. On my way back. I encountered another Albatros and turned to face him rather than present my back. Unusually, both were confirmed for #30 and #31...
Posted By: Deejan

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/14/18 01:20 AM

Hey Gents.
I’ve survived the first 10 days of bloody April 1917 with my Pup pilot from 66 Sqd. This has included: 3 balloon attacks, 3 attacks on airfields at Erchin, La Petrie, & Riencourt some escort work and sally’s into enemy territory which caused frayed nerves and a damaged Pup. I’ve been shot up 6 times, had 2 engine failures just prior to reaching German lines & have been credited with 2 Rolands, a Halberstadt, and 2 Albatros DII’s bringing my total to 8. Action, when it occurs is fast and furious! I must admit I dread the airfield attacks the most! Members of my flight have survived our sorties and we swill ale, whiskey and enjoy raucous banter during evenings in the mess! If I survive I will request some leave in England! Maybe the weather will be foul tomorrow so I can catch up on some much needed rest....and a hangover! I will continue to persevere!
Posted By: Deejan

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/14/18 01:29 AM

Hello Gentlemen

Another page in the life of 66 Sqdn during bloody April:

I have reached 17 April17 and came back alone from a balloon busting mission as my flight was bounced by 5 Albatros scouts. My poor Pup was riddled but the engine was working fine. I damaged 2 of the Albatros scouts, 1 trailing smoke as they headed east and I west with the controls of my Pup very much damaged. I managed to set her down at the closest friendly airfield, ammunition almost done, physically drained and very thirsty. Debriefing showed the whole flight of 4 survived, with a confirmed kill to our flight leader. 2 of my flight dustained injuries and have been hospitalized for 7 days. New pilots will fill the gaps for our next sortie. Bloody April continues.
Posted By: Rick_Rawlings

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/14/18 02:59 AM

Yeah, I don't know what the higher-ups expect you to do against an airfield with a single .303 vickers!
Posted By: ARUP

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/06/18 02:43 PM

Fees...pfffffttt.... easy meat.... right? RIGHT? Dive through in your trusty Albi, head on, with your flight, spew some lead, level off, climb away. Repeat if needed. Nope! My guy, with two Blue Maxes, got pipped in the head. It was over just like that.
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/26/18 02:03 AM

https://giphy.com/gifs/alaskaairlines-3ohs80nHmyXhKfHV28/fullscreen
Posted By: carrick58

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/26/18 02:06 AM

Attacking an Aerodrome with one Vickers 303 can cause damage. The holes in the ground can cause weeds to grow in the spots Thus pulling more man power off the line to pull weeds in order to keep the Airfield clear.
Posted By: DukeIronHand

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/29/18 07:25 PM

Originally Posted by ARUP
Fees...pfffffttt.... easy meat.... right? RIGHT? Dive through in your trusty Albi, head on, with your flight, spew some lead, level off, climb away. Repeat if needed. Nope! My guy, with two Blue Maxes, got pipped in the head. It was over just like that.


The ole Fee actually brought down a good number of German Kanonen.
Posted By: Ace_Pilto

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/30/18 05:00 AM

Originally Posted by carrick58
Attacking an Aerodrome with one Vickers 303 can cause damage. The holes in the ground can cause weeds to grow in the spots Thus pulling more man power off the line to pull weeds in order to keep the Airfield clear.


Yeah, ok, you got me to laugh with that one.
Posted By: lederhosen

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 05/30/18 07:05 AM

day-ja ja-vooooo

[Linked Image]
Posted By: ARUP

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 06/03/18 04:17 PM

Great picture! Isn't it exciting flying crappy airplanes? Try the DH-5 or, maybe, a two-holer!
Posted By: Sailor_Steve

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/13/18 04:56 PM

I have an OCD problem with historical sims. I have to start at the beginning. I created a French pilot who started training on the earliest day it would let me - March 20, 1915. For anyone who has never done this, it's fun. Unfortunately my French pilot was training in a BE.2, but still...

Two check-rides around the field in the observer's cockpit with the instructor flying. There is a placard on the dash with two notes:
"Do not stand in the aeroplane until instructed to do so."
"Be sure your personal affairs are in order before entering the aeroplane."

Days three and four were short hops in the pilot's seat, following the instructor around the field. Days five and six were navigation training, following the instructor on a long (3 hours) journey from home base to another airfield and back. Days seven and eight were "free flight", gaining time in the cockpit and on my own. Day seven was spent flying exploring Paris, and day eight involved a long trip westward then north, then paralleling the Front eastward then back home.

All this leads to today, my first combat mission. A flight of three Morane 'L's patrolling just on our side of the lines. No enemy activity, but some artillery was aimed our direction. The was one air burst not to far away from our flight. All-in-all an interesting introduction to the war.
Posted By: lederhosen

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/13/18 07:46 PM

Hallo Sailor

1915 is great time to fly for looking at the early morning sky. No Uboots, just cold, frosty air
Posted By: dutch

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 07/13/18 08:18 PM

Originally Posted by Sailor_Steve
I have an OCD problem with historical sims. I have to start at the beginning. I created a French pilot who started training on the earliest day it would let me - March 20, 1915. For anyone who has never done this, it's fun. Unfortunately my French pilot was training in a BE.2, but still...

Two check-rides around the field in the observer's cockpit with the instructor flying. There is a placard on the dash with two notes:
"Do not stand in the aeroplane until instructed to do so."
"Be sure your personal affairs are in order before entering the aeroplane."

Days three and four were short hops in the pilot's seat, following the instructor around the field. Days five and six were navigation training, following the instructor on a long (3 hours) journey from home base to another airfield and back. Days seven and eight were "free flight", gaining time in the cockpit and on my own. Day seven was spent flying exploring Paris, and day eight involved a long trip westward then north, then paralleling the Front eastward then back home.

All this leads to today, my first combat mission. A flight of three Morane 'L's patrolling just on our side of the lines. No enemy activity, but some artillery was aimed our direction. The was one air burst not to far away from our flight. All-in-all an interesting introduction to the war.


Same here always at the starting date when it becomes to WW1.
Go hunting for the Aviatik B1. If do like the mountains try to go for the Alsace Belfort regio, flying in your Morane that is so Beautiful.
Posted By: Nowi

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 09/12/18 02:10 PM

[The Letters of Wilhelm 'Willy' Kaulitz]

2 September 1916
Lagnicourt Aerodrome, France

Father,

I am well! I have completed my training at the Fokker school at Schwerin and have been posted to Lagnicourt.

When I completed my single-seater training at Schwerin, where I trained on Eindeckers, I assumed I’d be sent to an Eindecker unit, but at the last minute I was called into the commander’s office and ordered to join a new Jadgstaffeln at Lagnicourt.

Last summer, when I was flying two-seaters with Kaghohl 2 at Kovel, I had the good fortune to meet Hauptmann Boelcke, of whose exploits I am certain you have read in the newspapers. He was touring the front and visited his brother, who commanded my unit. I was assigned to take Boelcke up in an orientation flight along our sector of the front. At one point we spied a column of Russian cavalry in column along a road. Beolcke, who was flying as my observer, signaled me with his hands to indicate that he wanted me to fly low near the column so he could engage it. I did that, hopping over fences and hedges parallel to the column while he let loose with our machine gun, scattering the column in holy terror. The Hauptmann later told me that it was the first action he’d had in months, and he much enjoyed it.

Apparently, he remembered me and personally asked that I be assigned to his new unit. I arrived here on the 30th of August and proceeded to spend my days doing orientation flights of the area, and discussing aerial matters with Boelcke and my new Jasta-mates.

I was not assigned to an Eindecker, but to a newer Fokker biplane. Its much like the E IV I trained on, with the double rotary engine and two machine guns. It’s still a warper, without ailerons. But it’s much more maneuverable than the E IV. But, oh, how I wish I had been assigned one of the new Albatros machines that Boelcke and a few of the others in our unit are flying. They are much faster than my slow Fokker. Herr Hauptmann assures me that I will soon be flying one of the Albatrosses as they reach our unit.

He truly is the great man that we read about in the papers. He’s doing an excellent job training us in his methods, a method that has done so well for him. And despite his efforts to help us, he somehow keeps scoring; shooting down ever more of the Lords.

I’ll try to write every week, or perhaps every fortnight.

Your son,

Willy
Posted By: CaptSopwith

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 12/02/18 04:43 PM

Originally Posted by Sailor_Steve
I have an OCD problem with historical sims. I have to start at the beginning. I created a French pilot who started training on the earliest day it would let me - March 20, 1915. For anyone who has never done this, it's fun. Unfortunately my French pilot was training in a BE.2, but still...

Two check-rides around the field in the observer's cockpit with the instructor flying. There is a placard on the dash with two notes:
"Do not stand in the aeroplane until instructed to do so."
"Be sure your personal affairs are in order before entering the aeroplane."

Days three and four were short hops in the pilot's seat, following the instructor around the field. Days five and six were navigation training, following the instructor on a long (3 hours) journey from home base to another airfield and back. Days seven and eight were "free flight", gaining time in the cockpit and on my own. Day seven was spent flying exploring Paris, and day eight involved a long trip westward then north, then paralleling the Front eastward then back home.

All this leads to today, my first combat mission. A flight of three Morane 'L's patrolling just on our side of the lines. No enemy activity, but some artillery was aimed our direction. The was one air burst not to far away from our flight. All-in-all an interesting introduction to the war.


I have the same issue Steve. It took all of my might to overcome the mantra of "no, you must start at the beginning" and jump into some mid 1917 campaigns. I realized that in all of my years of owning UE, I have yet to fly my favorite plane of the war, the SE5. It feels lightning quick after spending these last few years at the controls of Moranes and early Nieuports or, heaven forbid, the Eindecker.

As an aside, I recently discovered (on accident) the autotrim hotkey and suddenly the Eindecker isn't the side-slipping widow maker it once was!
Posted By: Sailor_Steve

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 12/03/18 04:23 AM

Autotrim?
Posted By: CaptSopwith

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 12/03/18 07:01 PM

Originally Posted by Sailor_Steve
Autotrim?


ctrl-a activates autotrim. If you hit the z key you can see how much the autotrim is correcting for the aircraft surfaces. In the case of the EII, I was seeing corrections in excess of 35 degrees. It corrects a lot of the pulling and yawing of the aircraft, which for my setup of an old Sidewinder stick and no rudder pedals, allows me to take off without the machine side slipping me right into an early grave!
Posted By: Sailor_Steve

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 12/04/18 01:28 AM

Thanks for that. The Morane 'L' has some pretty nasty habits in that area. I'll have to give it a try.
Posted By: lederhosen

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 12/04/18 06:20 AM

or just press "Y" for straight and level flight. And "Y" again to end it

http://simhq.com/forum/ubbthreads.php/topics/4303396/Re:_Straight_and_Level_Autopil#Post4303396
Posted By: ARUP

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 12/13/18 03:03 AM

RNAS-1 Triplane pilot Ltn. Percy Hardward, a veteran of over 40 hours flight time, continues to wreak havoc upon the enemy as he leads his flight from one 'scrap' to another. His most recent mission the morning of 17 April 1917 was to attack an airfield which is the home of Jasta 11. In enemy territory and on the way to the target his squad mates say he downed a lone Ablatros D-II with 4 or 5 shots. Then, the group had the good fortune to catch 3 of the Jasta 11 Albatros D-III taking off which were dispatched with haste right over their own field. Hardward got his second Albatros for the day. As the flight regrouped and gained altitude they spied a number of aircraft about 500 meters above their altitude. Using caution until sufficient height was gained he lead the flight so that it 'mirrored' the unknown aircraft flight pattern keeping his flight between the 'mud' and the EA. The aircraft ended up being 7(?) Albatros D-II. Teasing them Harward was able to entice the enemy just over friendly lines at 2000 meters near Arras-Monchy. Two EA were seen to fly away. Hardward signaled the attack. One of Hardward's flight went out of the fray with engine trouble(?), two others each engaged a single enemy while Hardward's wingman watched Hardward take on 3 D-IIs. Harward flits his Tripehound to make an unsteady target while positioning for the perfect shot. Ten or so rounds and one Albi rolls away, its fate unknown. That leaves two. A few 'merry go rounds' and he pips another, It spins down with a vapor trail and impacts 'terra firma'! It's pilot was named 'Brecht' or something similar. The last was just about as quickly dispatched and in a similar manner. This Albatros was piloted by Jasta 13-D Ernst Baron de Payrebrune de Saint Seve, according to papers found at the crash scene just behind the trenches. What a French sounding name for a German aviator! Ltn. Percy Hardward could have claimed four victories, maybe five, but he doesn't seem to be interested. He just wants his supper! So much for 'Blutiger April'!
Posted By: ARUP

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 12/22/18 01:07 AM

Ltn. Hardward transferred into RFC 56 squadron to fly SEs in the middle of April '17. He didn't care much for the steed after flying 'Tripehounds'! It is rumored that Hardward never got any bullet holes in his 'Tripehound' but that is not the case with the SE, much to his dismay. He continues to show an aggressive but cautious figure as a flier and has saved a few pounds of his squadron mates' bacon! He successfully transferred back to his RNAS 1 unit in May. His most recent exploit was to lead a raid on an enemy airfield whereupon three Albatrosen were caught napping on the field. After some lead 'energy pills' were administered to the sleepy, lifeless airdrome, it was able to awaken. Then...five Albatros scouts miraculously appeared overhead. The Albatros scouts descended as the five 'Tripehounds' climbed and a general melee ensued at about 500 meters above the enemy field. All of the Albatrosen were dispatched with haste but one of the Triplanes had to make a forced landing while the other three flew off(?) for various reasons unknown. Hardward was able to land his steed next to the downed pilot, took the pilot on as a 'wing-walking' passenger then flew to safety much to the discomfort of the 'wing walker' who was able to disembark at a friendly field... not soon enough in his words or to that effect! Hardward downed two Albatros scouts on this sortie but considers it all in a day's work therefore filed no claims. His gunnery accuracy seems to hover around 40% according to the mechanics and gunnery fitters. Hardward said he just wants his lunch!
Posted By: Wulfe

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 01/01/19 09:17 PM

Sgt. T. Lawson Brooks,
No. 46 Squadron R.F.C
June 1st, 1917.

Our pups sat in a row on La Gorgue aerodrome, glinting in the morning sunlight. Mines was still in its standard PC10 livery, but the other machines of No. 46 Squadron - who had only recently returned from Home Defence duties - were painted in all kinds of bright colours, and several bore nicknames given to them by their pilots. Next to my own machine sat "Chin-Chow", Lt. Lee's Pup. As he had told me before, he was very fond of this machine as, just before leaving for England on Home Defence, Boom Trenchard himself had allowed Lee to take the best Pup he could find from the aircraft Depot, and "Chin-Chow" (then unnamed) had been his choice.

Led by Lt. Odell, 'B' Flight, consisting of seven pilots including myself, lifted into the air. We were to fly a CP in our own lines, and look for marauding Huns coming over the lines. I was yet to see a Hun machine, and was fearful that, even should I spot one, I would not recognise it, but Odell assured me that I would know when I saw one.

We climbed up and headed North for Poperinge at 9,000 feet, and as we flew I scanned the skies with keen eyes, a thousand scenarios of meeting the Hun running through my head. In one moment, I had shot down 5 Huns single-handed, in the next I was deciding whether to jump or burn. The uncertainty put me on edge.

We had flown for about forty minutes, and I continued my long sweeping scans of the sky, when suddenly I spotted, far away to our right, a mass of black specks coming our way. The others had seen it too, and we lazily turned as one to face the unknown formation. As they approached, I could make them out better - single-seat scouts with elegant, rounded fuselages and swept back wingtips. I recognised their profile from my training - they were German Albatroses!

Our two formations circled each other, goading the other to come on. After a few seconds of this, one insolent Hun gracefully rolled and turned towards our pack. Out in front, Odell took on the challenge, breaking away from our group to meet the German. They approached each other head-on, and in an instant they were rolling around each other, skidding and banking across the sky in a furious fight to get on the other's tail. As this happened, our own formation and the Albatros formation charged each other, diving in after the two duellists, and soon the sky was a tangled mess of tracer fire and twisting aeroplanes.

Hesitantly I weaved through the furball - everything was happening so fast around me! To my left, an Albatros spun down with a Pup firing at him as he went. To my right, a chain of British and German machines chased each other's tails in a line. I looked behind me, and was shocked to find a bright red Hun(1) lining up a shot on me. I immediately skidded away to the right, and saw the flash of tracer where i had been sitting a moment before. Pulling the stick into my stomach, I circled with my opponent, our own private duel surrounded on all sides by vicious fighting, and soon I had caught up to his tail. As I fired, the Red Albatros dove away. I rolled onto my back and followed, my Pup shuddering in protest as we fell, before the German straightened out again. I saw the flash of red in my gun-sights and let the Vickers speak, but my aim must have been poor, for the Albatros, who was only mere feet away, promptly banked hard away to the right and disappeared into a cloud.

I turned back into the fight, just in time to see the horrific sight of a Pup and an Albatros smashing into each other mid-flight. I watched, sickened, as the two machines became entangled and fell, spinning as they dropped to oblivion. However, I had no time to watch them go all the way, for our scrap was still going strong. To my low right, I saw "Chin Chow" flash past, with two Albatroses following. I dove after the trio, and behind me I saw two more Pups join the chase. Firing a ten-second burst at the two Germans, they abandoned their pursuit of Lt. Lee and turned back to face us. Following the rearmost Hun, I was quickly behind him and shooting - his machine had its tail painted green, with yellow-and-black fins(2). I thought it a rather ugly machine.

Firing at green-tail as we dropped in a spiralling dive, I watched in growing anticipation as holes appeared in the wings and plywood fuselage of my opponent. My tracers crept up his tail, towards his cockpit, and suddenly his machine pitched up violently! As I zoomed under, I saw the pilot hanging lifeless on his straps, before the plane stalled on its nose, fell backwards, and spun towards the earth. Circling, I watched it go all the way down and crash into a thousand pieces on the ground below.

Now low and stuck underneath the fight, I watched as two Pups chased a black Albatros3) towards the ground as I flew back for home, but it seemed that the majority of the fighting was over. I made it back to La Gorgue without incident and reported my claim to the Adjutant. Later that evening, it was corroborated by Lt. Barragar.



(1) - Max Ritter von Mueller, Jasta 28w.

(2) - Ernst Hess, Jasta 28w.

(3) Franz Ray - Jasta 28w.

Posted By: Simis29

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 02/09/19 10:11 AM

Hello everybody

Reports with video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FIEUk8K1ApE&t=228s

Enjoy wink
Posted By: ARUP

Re: REPORTS FROM THE FRONT - 03/16/19 05:40 PM

Ferdinand von Fracken has survived six months of misery flying Gothas. His first mission resulted in engine failure with a forced landing. His second was a very long trip to the southern region of the lines to drop bombs on an army camp. His third resulted in an attack by three winged enemy scouts in which he was badly injured. The missions start to become a very sadistic blur but at least the sojourn to England was uneventful! In further missions he took matters into his own hands and dropped bombs where he thought prudent... not where the staff decided! Most of the time the front lines were the recipients of 'fresh eggs'! He has now successfully transferred to Jasta 6 where he is flying Albatros D-II machines. So far so good!
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