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#4460449 - 02/08/19 01:26 PM Object descriptions  
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 21
Tango_Sierra Offline
Junior Member
Tango_Sierra  Offline
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Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 21
Ontario, Canada
Where can I locate object descriptions? Can you open the individual files with a text program, and print out the info like you can with training .msg files?

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#4460589 - 02/09/19 03:01 PM Re: Object descriptions [Re: Tango_Sierra]  
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 21
Tango_Sierra Offline
Junior Member
Tango_Sierra  Offline
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Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 21
Ontario, Canada
Here's a picture so you know what it is I'm talking about.

Attached Files grab0000.jpg
#4460630 - 02/09/19 07:42 PM Re: Object descriptions [Re: Tango_Sierra]  
Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 25,932
wheelsup_cavu Offline
Lifer
wheelsup_cavu  Offline
Lifer

Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 25,932
Corona, California
In the stock game that file is hidden in one of the .sfs files.
In HSFX this is the location for that that file: Files\i18n\air.properties
Since it is a .properties file it is formatted to be read by the game so you will need to copy and edit the file in another text format so you can print out the information.

Here is an example of what you will see when you open the file.
A-20DB7 \n A-20C, 1941\n\nType: Light Bomber / Attack\n\nWeight:\nEmpty: 5,330 kg\nTake-off: 7,700 kg\nMaximum: 10,660 kg\n\nLength: 14.5 m\nWingspan: 18.7 m\nWing area: 43.2 sq m\n\nEngine: 2 \u0425 Wright SC3G\nPower: 1,100 HP at sea level\n\nTop speed:\nSea level: 330 km/h\nAt 3,800 m: 434 km/h\n\nService Ceiling: 8,400 m\nRange: 1,690 km\n\nArmament:\n4 \u0425 .303 cal machine guns (forward-firing)\n3 \u0425 .303 cal machine gun (defensive)\nUp to 1,800 kg of bombs\n\nThe A-20 began as a Douglas Model 7 in 1936, when the Douglas Aircraft Company attempted to build a new twin-engine ground attack plane. It was not built to US Air Force specifications, but rather as a free design intended to be sold to any interested parties. The first order was placed in February of 1938 by the French, who ordered 100 planes. \n\nThe French requested multiple modifications, and the resulting Douglas Model 7B was very different from the initial prototypes. Only 60 were delivered before Germany invaded France, most of which did not see combat. Some went on to fly for the Vichy regime; some others remained in service with the Free French until the end of the war. The French had placed an additional order for DB-7s fitted with the Wright R-2600-A5B Double Cyclone engines; however none were delivered in time.\n\nGreat Britain took over the contract after France surrendered, and re designated the ex-French planes Boston Mk I and Mk II. \n\nBy now the design was mature enough to warrant some American attention, and the USAAF ordered the DB-7B for their use, now designated A-20 Havoc. \n\nThe main shortcoming of the Boston, as far as the British were concerned, was its short range. The next variant they ordered, Boston Mk III, was to have larger fuel tanks, as well as redesigned instrument panel and improved electrical and hydraulic systems.\n\nLooking to standardize their variants, the US Air Force ordered what was essentially the Boston Mk III as the A-20C. Many of the aircraft initially intended for British and Soviet use were kept by the US after Pearl Harbor. It was the most numerous early-war variant of the A-20, before the definitive A-20G was introduced in 1943.\n\nMain Variants:\nDouglas Model 7A - initial prototype, powered by 450 hp Pratt & Whitney R-985 Wasp Junior engines.\nDouglas Model 7B - redesigned Model 7A, now powered by 1,100 hp Pratt & Whitney R-1830 S3C3-G. 270 ordered by the French.\nDB-7 B-3 - redesigned to French specifications. 1,000 hp Pratt & Whitney R-1830-SC3-G engines, metric instruments, French guns.\nBoston Mk I - French DB-7B with 1,000 hp Pratt & Whitney R-1830-SC3-G engines in British service.\nBoston Mk II - French DB-7B with 1,100 hp Pratt & Whitney R-1830-S3C4-G engines in British service.\nHavoc Mk I - Boston Mk I and II converted for night-time fighting, either as bombers or heavy fighters.\nDB-7A - built to French specifications with 1,600 hp Wright R-2600-A5B Double Cyclone engines.\nHavoc Mk II - DB-7A in British Service, used as night-fighters.\nDB-7B - redesigned DB-7A with improved range, armament, and armor.\nBoston Mk III - DB-7B in British service.\nDB-7C - ordered by Netherlands, but due to Japanese invasion the order was canceled, and these were sent to USSR.\nA-20 - initial USSAF version, similar to the DB-7B but with turbo supercharged Wright R-2600-7 engines.\nA-20A - first serial variant in service with the USAAF.\nA-20B - DB-7A modified for the USAAF.\nA-20C - Boston Mk III in USAAF service.\n\nAdvantages:\nLong range\nPowerful Armament by early-war standards\n\nDisadvantages:\nPoor defensive gun coverage\n\n\n\n
A-20C \n A-20C, 1941\n\nType: Light Bomber / Attack\n\nWeight:\nEmpty: 6,827 kg\nTake-off: 9,215 kg\nMaximum: 10,660 kg\n\nLength: 14.5 m\nWingspan: 18.7 m\nWing area: 43.2 sq m\n\nEngine: 2 \u0425 Wright R-2600-A5B Double Cyclone\nPower: 1,600 HP at sea level\n\nTop speed:\nSea level: 483 km/h\nAt 3,800 m: 546 km/h\n\nService Ceiling: 8,400 m\nRange: 1,690 km\n\nArmament:\n4 \u0425 .303 cal machine guns (forward-firing)\n3 \u0425 .303 cal machine guns (defensive)\nUp to 1,800 kg of bombs\n\nThe A-20 began as a Douglas Model 7 in 1936, when the Douglas Aircraft Company attempted to build a new twin-engine ground attack plane. It was not built to US Air Force specifications, but rather as a free design intended to be sold to any interested parties. The first order was placed in February of 1938 by the French, who ordered 100 planes. \n\nThe French requested multiple modifications, and the resulting Douglas Model 7B was very different from the initial prototypes. Only 60 were delivered before Germany invaded France, most of which did not see combat. Some went on to fly for the Vichy regime; some others remained in service with the Free French until the end of the war. The French had placed an additional order for DB-7s fitted with the Wright R-2600-A5B Double Cyclone engines; however none were delivered in time.\n\nGreat Britain took over the contract after France surrendered, and re designated the ex-French planes Boston Mk I and Mk II. \n\nBy now the design was mature enough to warrant some American attention, and the USAAF ordered the DB-7B for their use, now designated A-20 Havoc. \n\nThe main shortcoming of the Boston, as far as the British were concerned, was its short range. The next variant they ordered, Boston Mk III, was to have larger fuel tanks, as well as redesigned instrument panel and improved electrical and hydraulic systems.\n\nLooking to standardize their variants, the US Air Force ordered what was essentially the Boston Mk III as the A-20C. Many of the aircraft initially intended for British and Soviet use were kept by the US after Pearl Harbor. It was the most numerous early-war variant of the A-20, before the definitive A-20G was introduced in 1943.\n\nMain Variants:\nDouglas Model 7A - initial prototype, powered by 450 hp Pratt & Whitney R-985 Wasp Junior engines.\nDouglas Model 7B - redesigned Model 7A, now powered by 1,100 hp Pratt & Whitney R-1830 S3C3-G. 270 ordered by the French.\nDB-7 B-3 - redesigned to French specifications. 1,000 hp Pratt & Whitney R-1830-SC3-G engines, metric instruments, French guns.\nBoston Mk I - French DB-7B with 1,000 hp Pratt & Whitney R-1830-SC3-G engines in British service.\nBoston Mk II - French DB-7B with 1,100 hp Pratt & Whitney R-1830-S3C4-G engines in British service.\nHavoc Mk I - Boston Mk I and II converted for night-time fighting, either as bombers or heavy fighters.\nDB-7A - built to French specifications with 1,600 hp Wright R-2600-A5B Double Cyclone engines.\nHavoc Mk II - DB-7A in British Service, used as night-fighters.\nDB-7B - redesigned DB-7A with improved range, armament, and armor.\nBoston Mk III - DB-7B in British service.\nDB-7C - ordered by Netherlands, but due to Japanese invasion the order was canceled, and these were sent to USSR.\nA-20 - initial USSAF version, similar to the DB-7B but with turbo supercharged Wright R-2600-7 engines.\nA-20A - first serial variant in service with the USAAF.\nA-20B - DB-7A modified for the USAAF.\nA-20C - Boston Mk III in USAAF service.\n\nAdvantages:\nLong range\nPowerful Armament by early-war standards\n\nDisadvantages:\nPoor defensive gun coverage\n\n\n\n
A-20G \n Douglas A-20G Havoc\n\nType: Ground Attack\n\nWeight:\nGross: 10,941 kg (24,127 lbs)\n\nLength: 14.6 m (48 ft)\nWingspan: 18.6 m (61 ft)\n\nEngine: 2 x Wright R-2600-23\nPower: 1,600 HP\n\nTop speed:\nAt 3780 m (12,400 ft): 510 km/h (317 mph)\n\nService Ceiling: 7,864 m (25,800 ft)\nRange: 1,650 km (1,025 miles)\n\nArmament:\n6 x .50-cal Browning M2 machine guns (nose)\n3 x .50-cal Browning M2 machine guns (defensive)\n4,000 lbs of bombs\n\nDouglas Aircraft Company started on the A-20 project in 1936 as a replacement for the light single-engine attack planes of the day. This plane wasn't a response to any Air Force requirements, but rather Douglas own initiative which they built and tested and then offered to foreign buyers.\nFrance was the first customer, purchasing 100 units with a long list of specific modifications. Their planes were designated DB-7 and first flew in August of 1939. France only got 60 of them before they were attacked by Germany, and only 12 DB-7s saw action. Remaining French DB-7 were sent to England, which also ordered hundreds of additional DB-7s.\nIn May of 1939 USAAC also ordered A-20s for their own use. They requested various modifications including more powerful defensive armament. First operational aircraft were designated A-20A. Additional versions continued to be designed and produced throughout the war. Production totaled 7,385 A-20s of all variants, and they served with United States, British, Australian, Canadian, New Zealand, Soviet, Dutch and Brazilian air forces.\n\n\n\nAdvantages:\nPacks a powerful punch. Good armor protection and range.\n\nDisadvantages:\nHeavy, not very maneuverable.\n\n\n
B-17G \n B17G-10-BO, 1943\n\nType: Heavy Bomber\n\nWeight:\nTake-off: 29,711 kg\nMaximum: 32,659 kg\n\nLength: 22.78 m\nWingspan: 31.62 m\nWing Area: 131.92 sq. m.\n\nEngine: 4 x Wright R-1820-97 Cyclone with General Electric B-22 turbo superchargers\nPower:\nTake-off: 1,200 HP\nIndicated: 1,380 HP\n\nTop Speed:\nSea Level: 423 km/h\nAt 7.625 m:472 km/h\n\nService Ceiling: 10,851 m\nRange: 2,000 m\n\nArmament:\n2 X .50 cal Browning M2 machine guns in the Bendix nose turret\n2 \u0425 .50 cal Browning M2 machine guns in the chin positions\n2 \u0425 .50 cal Browning M2 machine guns in the top Sperry N.645473E turret\n2 \u0425 .50 cal Browning M2 machine guns in the under-fuselage Sperry N.645849J ball turret\n1 \u0425 .50 cal Browning M2 machine gun in the radio room\n1 \u0425 .50 cal Browning M2 machine gun on the right side of the tail section\n1 \u0425 .50 cal Browning M2 machine gun on the left side of the tail section\n2 \u0425 .50 cal Browning M2 machine gun in the tail turret\nUp to 7,983 kg of bombs (for shorter range flights)\n\nB-17G was the further modification of the B-17F. The story of the new modification of the famous Fort began with the heavy escort fighter prototype designated YB-40, which was basically the basic B-17 with more flexible machine guns. YB-40 made a rather poor fighter, but the Bendix nose turret proved successful and was recommended for installation on B-17s. The nose turret is the main new feature on the B-17G. First example took to the skies in July of 1043, and serial production aircraft entered service in the fall of the same year.\nAs the other variants, the B-17G was produced by three different countries: Boeing in Seattle (-BO), Douglas in Long Beach (-DL) and Lockheed-Vega in Burbank. Interestingly enough Douglas made no distinction between the F and G variants, and first examples of the new modification were designated B-17F-70-DL, -75-DL and -80-DL (altogether 76 B-17Gs were produced with such designation). \nDuring the production run the B-17G received several further modifications. The most notable addition was the new tail gunner position, known as Cheyenne which was fitted on the G-80-BO, G-45-DL \u0438 G-35-VE series and up. As opposed to the previous design where the gunner had to spend most of the mission on his knees, the new position provided a bit more comfort. Starting in January of 1944 B-17s were no longer painted with camouflage colors (G-35-BO, G-20-VE and G-35-DL series and up). In late 1944 the radio room machine gun was deleted.\nB-17G became the most mass produced variant, with 8,680 built. Boeing built 4,035, Douglas 2,395 and Lockheed 2,250 Flying Fortresses.\n\nMain Variants:\nB-17G-10-BO initial variant with the Bendix nose turret\nB-17G-90-BO variant with the Cheyenne tail gunner position\nB-17G-100-BO variant with the electric control column booster, which made controlling the plane easier. \n\nAdvantages:\nHigh bomb load\nPowerful defensive armament\nLong range\nHigh survivability\n\nDisadvantages:\nSomewhat low airspeed\nUncomfortable tail gunner position on earlier variants.\n\n
B-24J \n Consolidated B-24 Liberator (MOD)\n\nType: Land-based heavy bomber.\n\nWeight:\nEmpty: 14,790 kg (32,610 lbs)\nTakeoff, Typical: 29,050 kg (64,050 lbs)\nTakeoff, Fully Loaded: 32,300 kg (71,200 lbs)\n\nWingspan: 33.53 m (109.9 ft)\nLength: 20.22 m (66.2 ft)\nHeight: 5.46 m (17.9 ft)\n\nEngine: 4x Pratt&Whitney R-1830-43.\nPower: 1,200 hp each.\n\nSpeed:\nAt 6,000 m (19,680 ft): 351 km/h (218 mph)\n\nClimb to 6,000 m (19,680 ft): 25 min. 2 sec\nService Ceiling: 9,167 m (30,068 ft)\nRange: 5,309 km (3,300 miles)\n\nArmament:\nB-24D:\n3x.50 cal MG nose turret\n2x.50 cal MG dorsal turret\n2x.50 cal MG tail turret\n2x.50 cal MG ventral turret\n2x.50 cal MG waist positions\n\nB-24J:\n2x.50 cal MG nose turret\n2x.50 cal MG dorsal turret\n2x.50 cal MG tail turret\n2x.50 cal MG ventral turret\n2x.50 cal MG waist positions\n\nUp to 8,000 lbs of bombs.\n\nIn 1938 US Army Corps approached Consolidated with a request to allocate their production line to B-17 Flying Fortress. The Consolidated team however proposed to build a whole new bomber, promising it would be better than the B-17. Army Corps was interested in competition, so the idea was accepted. On March of the same year, Consolidated received an order for first prototype, designated XB-24. Nine months later, first of the future B-24s flew with great success. \n\nFirst versions, supplied to British and USAAF were not ready for combat, instead they were used for transport and maritime observation. It was B-24D, equipped with turbochargers, increased fuel capacity, and better armament which paved its path to glory. By this time, the Liberator was by far the most complicated and most expensive allied aircraft. It could carry greater bomb load and was faster than B-17, but was less stable in flight and not even near the battle damage resistance. \nThe US Navy equivalent - the PB4Y - was used extensively in the Pacific as a maritime patrol bomber and reconnaissance aircraft. \nDuring their WWII service, Liberators dropped more than 630,000 tons of bombs.\n\n\nManufacturer:\nConsolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation, United States of America\n\nMain Modifications:\nB-24D First mass production version. Fitted with 4x 1,200 hp Pratt & Whitney R-1840-43 engines. 2,784 built.\nB-24H Equipped with nose turret armed with 2x 12.7mm MG, retractable Sperry ball turret. 3,100 built. \nB-24J Improved H version, it was carrying Consolidated nose and tail turrets, new bombsight and electronic turbocharger. 6,678 built. \nB-24L Lighter tail, armed with manually operated 2x 12.7mm MG. 1,667 built. \nB-24M Same as L version, but with even lighter tail and tail turret. 2,594 built.\nPB4Y-1 Maritime version, based on D and M versions. Carried air to surface radar instead of the ventral turret. 977 built.\n\nAdvantages:\nCould carry substantial bomb load over long distance. Fast. Resistant to battle damage. Well armed. \n\nDisadvantages:\nFrontal part was not protected enough.\n\n\n




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#4460647 - 02/09/19 09:58 PM Re: Object descriptions [Re: wheelsup_cavu]  
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 21
Tango_Sierra Offline
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Tango_Sierra  Offline
Junior Member

Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 21
Ontario, Canada
Alright, thanks Wheels! smile


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