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#4440863 - 09/26/18 07:55 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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The Story of Benjamin A. Drummond

Part 23: Healing.

September 26th, 1918.

My head is feeling a lot better. My hip - not so much. I took a walk around the field outside the hospital tent today and found that I now have quite the debilitating limp. Nurses say it'll never leave me.

From my bedside I've been trying to stay informed on how our Air War is going. As it happened, just a couple days ago Eddie Rickenbacker was put in charge of the 94th. Lucky them! Rickenbacker was on 11 now; In the hospital we'd heard over the radio that he'd knocked down a Fokker over Damvillers earlier this morning.

We are all eagerly awaiting the upcoming Meuse-Argonne Offensive, set to kick off in October. We got the job done in spectacular fashion at St. Mihiel. The 3rd P.G. is going to be up high when it all kicks off - Fokker-hunting. Sounds like risky business, but at least we aren't doing the low-level jobs.

Nurses say I should be cleared to return to duty within the next 7 days.



Last edited by Wulfe; 09/26/18 08:05 AM.
#4440997 - 09/26/18 11:31 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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carrick58 Online content
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Ur Head ? Ur Hip ? What about a Nurse Report ! Honestly, we do have an order for things.

#4440998 - 09/26/18 11:36 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Darcel Limoges
Sous Lt.
Esc 95 Spads
Ochy, AF
Verdun , France
7 Victory s.


Sep 26, 1918.

Defensive Patrol. Our 3 a/c ran into 2 Recon types. Wild flying and firing passes Long and short range. I thought I got one but my claim was rejected. My fellow pilots were busy with the other e/a and I did not see the crash.

Attached Files CFS3 2018-09-26 16-19-23-70.jpgCFS3 2018-09-26 16-17-45-16.jpg
#4441297 - 09/28/18 04:41 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Raine Online content
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Wulfe, I’m amazed at your ability to produce three high-quality accounts concurrently. I’m enjoying them a great deal. I like the way you’ve developed von Haas. Do you speak German? Jerbear, glad to see Johnny doing so well. And Carrick, it’s starting to look like Limoges may just make it to the end.

I met up with Robert Wiggins in Toronto last week, where I was working with a client. We drove down to Dayton on Friday for the “Dawn Patrol Rendezvous”, a wonderful WW1 air show and festival on the grounds of Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and the USAF Museum. Great time! Stache had brought his complete rig and that of a friend, and hosted a display of WOFF for attendees all weekend. It was really a magnificent bit of support for the community and OBD, not to mention a flight sim setup that one can only dream of. Hats off to him!
Anyway, I’m back home and finally playing catch-up again...

Part 6

Vzfw Holger Barfuss, Jasta 7


The next week was a blur of flying several times a day, but success eluded Barfuss. On 21 May 1918, the Staffel escorted a lone Hannover on a reconnaissance of the lines to the south of the aerodrome at Ste-Marguerite. Leutnant Jacobs, as he often did, allowed another pilot to lead and Martens took the forward position. As the Hannover was completing its final run over the objective, a formation of SE5As passed overhead and, one by one, dived on the mixed formation of black Fokkers and Barfuss’s Albatros. For a minute or two it was a wild scrap, but the Jasta 7 pilots were all experienced men and, when none of the British planes scored an easy kill, they broke away, using their superior speed to end the fight. Barfuss managed a short burst at one SE that passed close in front of him, but the machine looped below him and disappeared.

Day faded into day. The little house in the village beckoned at dusk, and Barfuss longed for the time each evening when the squadron’s car picked up the NCO pilots and dropped them across a small square from the village Mairie, where a former inn served as the mess. After a quick meal, now commonly soup and bread, Barfuss walked home with Vzfw Naujak and Winslowe and a new boy, Vzfw Imelmann. Naujak teased the new fellow that he was “one M short of greatness.”

After several days of uneventful patrols up to the salient around Ypres or south to the Loos sector, the morning of 25 May brought action. Led by Ltn Bohme, a flight from the Staffel was tasked with a ground support patrol over the front near Passchendaele. Naujak and Imelmann were assigned, and they were joined by a new NCO, Offizierstellvertreter Jansen.

It was the first day that really felt like summer. Even at ten minutes before six in the morning, the sun’s warmth made them sweat in their heavy gear. Barfuss chatted with the mechanics who were running up the Albatrosses and Naujak’s Pfalz. Leutnants Bohne and Mertens were already in their little triplanes.
The first excitement of the morning did not hesitate to make its appearance. Barfuss was throttled back, waiting for the Fokkers to taxi away from the hangars. Just as he began to roll he saw a flash out of the corner of his eye. Naujak’s Pfalz was on fire! Barfuss took to the air and glanced back to see a dark column of smoke rising from the field.

There was no time to worry, as the leading Fokkers were already turning north and climbing away. Barfuss caught up with the formation over Menen, where they circled to gain height. Below, Zonnenbeke was shrouded in reddish brick dust. The English artillery was hard at work. Only a few miles to north lay the section of front they were to patrol and attack. Barfuss scanned the sky before the leader began his dive. As one of the more experienced in the flight, it was his job to watch their tail. There was nothing behind, but just as he was about to end his scan, several flea-like dots appeared to the northeast. He watched carefully until he could make out the bottom wing dihedral of the approaching biplanes and recognized them as Camels. He opened up to overtake Bohme.

Bohme glanced over to see Barfuss waving and pointing at the Camels and led the Staffel to the attack. Well-handled, a Camel could plant itself on one’s tail all day. Two of the English aircraft picked out Barfuss’s Albatros. He turned one way and then the other, unable to straighten long enough to regain speed. Gradually the Camels were forcing him to lose height. One of the enemy machines hit him with a spray of bullets, tearing away some of his right aileron. Barfuss felt the lack of response and teetered on the edge of a stall in turn after turn. Then, without apparent reason, one of the Camels broke off. The other machine was not as well flown. Barfuss pulled his sluggish machine to the left, playing to the Camel’s weakness in left turns. After several more minutes he got the enemy in his sights and fired. The first burst must have wounded the English pilot, for the Camel nosed down and headed west. Now the Albatros was in its element and Barfuss closed for the kill. He fired again from close range and saw the Camel tumble out of control.

[Linked Image]
"He fired again from close range and saw the Camel tumble out of control."

There was no time to watch it fall. Another English machine flashed past a little to his right and below. Barfuss turned and closed on the enemy, who miraculously had not seen him. He fired 20 rounds. The Camel nosed down and Barfuss followed, now taking ground fire as they passed over the British lines at 500 metres. He fired a long burst and saw the Camel crash into a field just past the enemy gun lines.

[Linked Image]
"He fired a long burst and saw the Camel crash into a field just past the enemy gun lines."

Neither fight was witnessed, and it took until evening before confirmation of the first Camel was received from the balloon section at Moorslede. The first Camel had been see to fall in front of our positions near Hooge. The second, unfortunately, remained unconfirmed.

26 May brought mixed news. Leutnant Fromm, newly arrived from Jastaschule, was killed in a scrap with some very aggressive DeHavilland two seaters. But that evening all the NCO pilots were invited to the officers’ Kasino for dinner, and Leutnant Jacobs announced that Holger Barfuss was now to hold the rank of Offizierstellvertreter, which brought with it membership in the officers’ mess, which Jacobs described as “having all the expense but none of the glory.” More significantly, Jacobs announced a parade to be held on the first rainy day – Barfuss was receiving the Iron Cross, First Class.

Attached Files Kill 5.pngUnconfirmed.jpg
Last edited by Raine; 09/28/18 04:44 PM.
#4441351 - 09/28/18 10:42 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Wow, Great pics Raine.

I hope Darcel makes it,But C' est La Vie.

#4441352 - 09/28/18 10:47 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Darcel Limoges
Sous Lt.
Esc 95 Spads
Ochy, AF
Verdun , France
7 Victory s.


Sep 27, 1918.

Escorted a Recon of an Infantry Troop Camp on Zee other side of the lines from Toul. I became very nervous as we had to fly under 2 Bosche Patrols of 5 and 7 aero machines. Luck was with us as no attacks were made on our 6 a/c.

Attached Files CFS3 2018-09-28 15-23-27-07.jpg
#4441354 - 09/28/18 11:17 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Darcel Limoges
Sous Lt.
Esc 95 Spads
Ochy, AF
Verdun , France
7 Victory s.


Sep 28, 1918.

The Esc hit a Boshe AF at Mar-la- Tours. A deep and dangerous mission due to Patrols and Ground fire. I made 2 passes about 150-200 rds fired then Home. We lost 3 machines out of 10 attacking. 1 to Gnd Fire the other 2 are Missing. Not a Good day.

Attached Files CFS3 2018-09-28 15-58-35-24.jpgCFS3 2018-09-28 15-59-07-58.jpg
#4441358 - 09/28/18 11:36 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Raine -Unfortunately no, I don't speak German! And I admit, 3 narratives may have been a bit ambitious wink

The Story of Bertram von Haas

Part 4: der Metzger.


The cold rain washed over Bertram's face, which was currently pointed to the sky as the airman lay back in his cockpit. A thin smile appeared on his lips, as he slowly tilted his head down and regarded the altimeter in front of him. An American bullet had smashed through it's centre, shattering the glass and rendering the instrument useless. Luckily, he had no use for it. With some effort, Bertram pulled himself up so that he was standing on the seat of his Fokker. He clumsily stepped over the side of the cockpit and fell, landing in the wheat and mud below with a cry of pain. Lethargically, he climbed to his feet, his right arm clasped tightly around the bullet hole in his left. He begun to laugh, as a man possessed or sick, scanning the skies hungrily for any remaining trace of the six American Spads he had just attacked. His eyes came to rest on the thin trail of smoke rising several miles to the North. His laughter grew upon this sight and, wiping the joy from his eyes, he turned to look over his machine, just in time to see the final drops of petrol escaping the holed tank. Ah, what a fight that had been - six against him alone! He knew that Buchner would have his head for this, but he didn't care.

His smile faded as the loss of blood begun to take his toll, and he dizzily staggered towards the lights of a nearby cottage on the edge of the field he had crash-landed in. A young boy watched him from the entryway, a confused mix of both terror and excitement on his face. Look! An Aviateur! But, a German! it said. Bertram took a few more steps towards the light, before slowly keeling over and falling to the side.

He awoke in the late evening, his arm bandaged and in a sling. A rugged old man sat across from the bed he had been laid down in - a look of hatred on his face. Bertram regarded this man with a curious look, and decided him to be pure soul. Filled with hatred for what had been done to his country, but not inhumane enough to let a wounded man bleed to death on his doorstep. Standing up, Bertram muttered a thank-you to the man and lit a cigarette, offering one up. The old farmer turned his head to the side. "Get out", he quietly mumbled, a hint of deep sadness failing to hide itself within the venom.

When Bertram arrived at his airfield a day later, the men all crowded round in shock, asking him a barrage of questions. "What happened?" "We thought you were dead - where did you get to?" on and on it went. He irritably brushed these questions aside as he made for the mess - right now, all he wanted was something hot to eat, a bottle of Schnapps, and a new machine. In the mess he met Niethammer, who broke into a broad grin when he walked in. "Ah, and here he is! You know, I knew you weren't dead, despite what the men told me. Although - flying off alone like that? You won't last very long, von Haas!"

Bertram's eyes lit up, as he returned the smile. "Ah, but aren't we here to die in the Kaiser's name?" he responded, and Niethammer burst out into hearty laughter. "Indeed we are, although you seem far more interested in killing for him! Tell me, von Haas, what is it that compels you to go off and attack entire squadrons of enemy machines alone? Is it the glory? The thrill?". Bertram's face suddenly turned pensive, contemplative. He slowly ran a thumb across his lip, deep in thought.

"Well, you see, it's quite simple. I could tell you that it's for vengeance - the long years in the trenches having to cower like a rat in amongst the French and British hellfire, but that's not quite it". His eyes lit up, and flashed upwards to meet Niethammer's. "No, the simple truth is that, after these long years, I've developed something of an appetite for murder". Niethammer's smile faded slightly, as Bertram calmly stood up, still smiling, and turned for the door. Niethammer felt a twisting sensation in his mind as, just before the door swung shut, he caught the first hummed notes of "Argonnerwald" .

Six days back on the Adjutant's desk was the price Bertram paid for his recklessness. On the second day he came across the reports from the Jasta's fight on the 21st. No report from Viktor Landvogt. Well, of course not, Bertram thought back fondly on the sight of the French Spad turning with Landvogt and Mueller, masterfully flicking his machine through the sky before shooting down both Germans. Beneath the fight, the burning wreckage of Landvogt's machine had barely missed Bertram. Ah, here was his own report! He grinned as he read over his three claims for the day. Amongst them was the Spad pilot that had killed his two comrades - one of three claims. Oh, what was this? Two had been confirmed!

No wonder he'd heard mutterings from his fellow Staffel pilots behind his back, hushed whispers of the name they had picked for him. "der Metzger", they called him, 'The Butcher'. How fitting.


Last edited by Wulfe; 09/28/18 11:53 PM.
#4441359 - 09/28/18 11:42 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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The Story of Benjamin A. Drummond

Part 24: The Wolf of Verdun


29 September, 1918.

Nothing but bad news from the 'drome. The 28th had reported running into a lone Fokker twice in the past few days, a blue machine with a white wolf painted on its side. The same bosche had shot down and killed one of them on the 22nd - apparently he'd dove, alone, into all six of them! One of the guys said he put a burst into the Fokker's back and had seen it drop through the clouds, but he didn't even seem to have convinced himself.

But 'The Wolf', as the boys from the 28th called him, wasn't the real bad news. Earlier today we heard something terrible over the radio - Frank Luke was missing. He'd gone out on one of his usual excursions, even dropped a note to one of the balloon crews telling them to "Watch for Burning Balloons" - nothing unusual there - but he never came back. We all fear the worst. Monk says he's planning on going over to ask the 1st P.G. guys if they've heard anything more.

I've been given a date to return to duty - October 1st. I wonder if, when I get back, I'll run into this 'Wolf' character. I'd very much like to kill the cocky hun.

Last edited by Wulfe; 09/28/18 11:53 PM.
#4441511 - 09/29/18 11:50 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: Wulfe]  
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2nd Lt. John B. Goode
147th Aero Squadron, USAS


Sunday, September 29th 1918

Back in Rembercourt. Operations Officer again. Got hit pretty hard by ground fire and the Kellner is in for repairs.

Dark and rainy Friday. Before sunrise 5 of us in air split up looking for balloons, Ty, Whitey, Dewey, Cutting and me. We saw 5 US balloons go up SE of Verdun, guess the Huns are early risers as well. We couldn’t find any German balloons, so shot up ground troops. Dewey and I stuck together.

Found 2 truck columns, shot them up, caused a lot of confusion but I don’t know how much real damage we did, made 4 passes while Dewey looked on. Got down to 80 rounds per gun, don’t like to have empty guns so I broke off to let Dewey have a turn.

[Linked Image]

As I was zooming up after my last pass my SPAD was hit by heavy ground fire, seemed like a whole MG company was using me for target practice. Took quite a few hits, hit my gas tank, fuel vapor trail. Felt several thumps in on the seat of my pants when bullets hit the plate in the seat. One round came up and smashed into the edge of the windshield and shattered it. I think it was an explosive bullet. It threw glass splinters into my face, scalp, hands, chest and arms. I clawed for as much sky as I could get. After the gas in the main tank gave out I started pumping the nourrice(1). Made it just over what I believed to be our lines before the engine stopped. then I had to try to make my brick glide. Was lucky, landed in a field that only had a few shell holes in it. Vaseline landing(2) considering the situation.

Didn’t know if I was behind our lines or not, pulled my 45 out after I dismounted, don’t know what I thought I was going to do with it. Doughs showed up from an MG company. The area had been taken only a few hours ago. Treated me like a celebrity, knew who I was, at least by name, read about all of us in the 1st Pursuit in the papers and had seen us flying over and strafing.

Got back to Rembercourt this morning. I was afraid Black was going to kill me for his balling up SPAD, but he just slapped me on the back and said he was glad to see me in one piece. Maybe the blood all over my clothes softened him up a little. He went out with a salvage crew and he thinks he can fix it up so we loaded it on a trailer and brought it back here.

Not in bad shape, they got all the glass out of me, quite a few stitches in my hide. Face looks a little like a road map.

Hate to be here while everyone else is up there but then again, secretly a little pleased not to have to fly those low missions for a while. Very nerve wracking to be down that low over Germany. Dewey got his SPAD shot up on a balloon bust Saturday. Made it back to Brabant-en-Argonne but his bus is going to have to be overhauled. Coming back here tomorrow.

Pup glad to see me, wants to lick my cuts. I let her, dog saliva is supposed to be good for a wound but I have to make her stop after a while because she’ll make them bleed again, doesn’t know when to quit.

Hartney put 1st Lieutenant bars on me this morning.

The BIG PUSH started on Thursday. They told us the preparatory bombardment would start at 05:30 but at 10 o’clock the night before there was a gradual increase in our artillery activity. After awhile it reached a point where there was practically no interruption in the roar. This went on all night. Sleep was out of the question to we sat around watching the fireworks and had a few drinks.

I finally laid down to at least rest, even if I couldn’t sleep. Put wax in my ears and got a little shut eye. At 4 am we were rousted out for a quick breakfast before we rushed out to the hangars. The flashes of the guns looked like a living stream of fire and the roar was unbelievable.

At dawn, we saw that the lines were covered by a thick fog all the way down to the ground but we had to fly and so did the Germans. The weather was just as bad for them as it was for us.

Alk.’s SPAD was down so I led a four man patrol at 05:00, Whitey led another patrol right after we took off. The Front was really something to see from directly above and in the dark. We had to fly at 1,000 meters, right on top of the barrage. The concussion of the explosions and the air stream from the incoming shells tossed us around. I was a little nervous that a shell might actually hit me. The noise was amazing, earplugs or no earplugs. The gun flashes were continuous and both sides sent up a stream of star shells and flares, quite beautiful. Now and then, Archie burst around us or a machine gun would take a pot shot.

We found our sausage, floating at the same altitude we were forced to fly near Bois de Brieulles. All 4 of us flew right at it, firing our incendiaries right into the bag. Burst right in front of us, so bright in the dim light it looked like an ammo dump going up. Got confirmation Friday, me, Dewey, Peak and Myers.

[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]

We were constantly in the air all day. I don’t know how many missions our Flight made. I went up 4 times, attacking the balloon, truck and wagon columns, gun positions, machine gun nests, trenches, would have gone up a 5th time but my SPAD was too shot up.

Push still going on, 4th day, fog and low flying clouds, Huns are still active. The Group is still strafing.

Whitey got 2 Fokkers,one shared with Herron and Scroggie from the 94th
Ennis and Pip got a Rumpler together.

Ken, Myers and Simmy flamed a Rumpler N. of Clerges

The rest of the Group had 8 combats, took down 3 balloons.

Reports say 25,000 Hun prisoners, roads very congested so that no ambulances can get through to the front. Lines advanced 9 km. Our casualties said to be very heavy. Boche had thousands of machine guns ready and knew where we were attacking 5 days ago.

Luke took down a sausage and a bi place on Saturday, they say he’s taking crazy chances. At first, nobody wanted him in the 27th because they thought he was a four-flusher, now nobody wants to fly with him because he’s crazy. He thinks he’s invincible, even says “nothing can touch me,” anybody that flys with him is liable to get themselves killed, like Wehner and Roberts.


(1) Nourrice – reserve fuel tank
(2) Vaseline landing – good landing made under difficult circumstances


I know the picture of the bursting balloon isn't from the same mission, it was something I did with another character but it was so bright I decided to plug it in for color

Attached Files John em.jpgshot 12.jpgShot 16.jpg
Last edited by jerbear; 10/02/18 09:53 PM.
#4441604 - 09/30/18 06:26 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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carrick58 Online content
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good stories.

#4441606 - 09/30/18 06:39 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Darcel Limoges
Sous Lt.
Esc 95 Spads
Ochy, AF
Verdun , France
7 Victory s.

Sep 30, 1918.

The Esc put up 4 a/c for Area Patrol. Chased and attacked 3 Rumpler types over Toul and NML. The flight shot down 1 Two Seat the from out where a flight of Fokker's dropped on us. Twist ,turn bank and zoom. After a while, without getting shot down, I spotted one Scout lower then me and Alone. A classic Bounce. I fired off 150-160 shells from each gun. The e/a swung hard right and started doing lazy " S " 's going down. Getting closer I spotted that I had smash the tip of the lower right wing forcing him down. He crash landed outsid of the Bend in the River near Toul. Score: 2 e/a Destroyed. for 1 Wnd Pilot and 2 damaged Spads. Upon landing I put in for a 2 day pass to Paris.

Attached Files CFS3 2018-09-30 11-13-11-59.jpgCFS3 2018-09-30 11-13-50-35.jpg
#4441622 - 09/30/18 08:28 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: carrick58]  
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1st Lt. John B. Goode
147th Aero Squadron, USAAS

Monday, September 30th 1918

Luke is missing. He went off with his SPAD on his own yesterday, unauthorized and AWOL as far as Grant was concerned. Dropped a note over the balloon company at Soilly telling them to watch the 3 Hun balloons along the Meuse. He flamed all three but hasn’t been heard from since. One crazy stunt too many, must have had a death wish.

Dewey came in this morning. Was going to make him salute me as a gag but he looked so worn out I didn’t have the heart to go through with it. He paid me back for my forbearance by making fun of my face. He got his silver bars this afternoon.

Face hurts like hell but everything is healing fine.

Two new pilots, Cox (1 )and Waters(2)..


(1) 1st Lt. Charles E. Cox, C Flight, from Indianapolis, Indiana

(2) 1st Lt. John C. Waters, A Flight, from St. Louis, MO, will achieve 1 aerial victory, transferred to 185th Aero Squadron 18 Oct. 1918


Last edited by jerbear; 10/01/18 02:32 AM.
#4441645 - 10/01/18 02:04 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Raine Online content
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I'm sorry to report that I lost Holger Barfuss today. After scoring his sixth victory over a Spad 13 on the morning of 28 May 1918, he downed a Camel in the afternoon and was following a second Camel down to ensure it didn't get away when his Albatros broke up in mid-air.

I may take a break from the DiD to fly some other personal campaigns.

What is the interest in a new community DiD campaign after 11 November? I've been thinking about a "deep immersion" campaign that focuses on really good and entertaining historical accounts, exchange of information and research, etc. Any ideas or suggestions?

#4441656 - 10/01/18 07:47 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Awful news about Barfuss - I was very fond of him. As for another community DiD...count me in!!

#4441764 - 10/01/18 10:20 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Raine, sorry to hear about your Flieger's demise. The Centenary Campaign should continue even after 11 November. Don't forget, there is still Intrepid Fliers group, which enlisted 4 months earlier, so their Armistice will not come until … (counts fingers on his left hand) 11 March, 2019. This, of course, doesn't mean another campaign cannot be started in November. I miss the pilot stats ...


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4441766 - 10/01/18 10:22 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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News of the World for May - Intrepid Fliers:

May 1
German forces occupied Sevastopol in the Crimea and established a military dictatorship in the Ukraine under Field Marshal Hermann von Eichhorn.
May 2
The Netherlands concluded an agreement with Germany regarding the export of sand and gravel.
May 4
The Second action of Es Salt ended. The battle had been fought by General Sir Edmund Allenby's Egyptian Expeditionary Force east of the Jordan River following the failure of the First Transjordan attack on Amman during the Sinai and Palestine Campaign.
May 5
Field Marshal Sir John French was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.
May 6
German and Turkish delegates arrived at Batum to negotiate peace with the Georgians and Armenians.
May 7
The Treaty of Bucharest was signed at Buftea between Romania and the Central Powers and Turkey. Under the terms of the agreement Romania ceded Dobrudja and the Carpathian passes and leased its oil fields to Germany for 99 years.
May 8
German forces captured Rostov in south Russia.
May 9
British Prime Minister David Lloyd George overwhelmingly won a censure motion brought by his predecessor, Herbert Asquith.
May 10
The British launched a second raid on Ostend. The Royal Navy warship HMS Vindictive was successfully scuttled in the harbour entrance to prevent German cruisers using the port.
May 11
Finland and Turkey signed a peace agreement in Berlin.
May 12
The flag of the Republic of Finland, with a crest in red and yellow depicting a lion, was raised for the first time, on Viapori.
May 13
The creation of the Independent Air Force was announced. The IAF was a strategic bombing force, part of the Royal Air Force, used to strike against German railways, aerodromes and industrial centres.
May 15
The Entente powers signed an agreement with Japan and China at Peking regarding German penetration in the Far East.
May 16
Three months after Montana had passed a similar law, The Sedition Act was passed by the United States Congress. The legislation extended the Espionage Act of 1917 to cover a broader range of offenses, notably speech and the expression of opinion that cast the government or the war effort in a negative light or interfered with the sale of government bonds.
May 17
A number of Sinn Fein leaders, including Eamon de Valera, were arrested and interned due to their campaign against conscription in Ireland.
May 18
Turkish forces occupied Alexandropol in Georgia.
May 19
The German Air Force launched an intense air raid on London inflicting a high number of casualties.
May 21
A naval engagement was fought between the American armed yacht USS Christabel and the German submarine UC-56 in the Atlantic Ocean off Spain.
May 23
Costa Rica declared war on Germany.
The British armed mercantile cruiser SS Moldavia was torpedoed and sunk in the English Channel by the German submarine UB-57 while carrying American troops from Halifax, Nova Scotia, to London.
May 24
General F C Poole landed at Murmansk, to organise the North Russian Expeditionary Force.
May 25
Following the arrests of the Sinn Fein leaders the British Government published accounts of the alleged Irish-German plot to start an armed insurrection in Ireland.
May 26
The Transcaucasian Federal Republic was dissolved. The Democratic Republic of Georgia proclaimed a National Government under the Menshevik politician, Noe Zhordania.
May 27
German forces attacked the French along the front between Soissons and Rheims in the Third Battle of the Aisne, crossing the river and splitting the French and British forces.
May 28
The first American offensive of the war, the Battle of Cantigny was fought and won near the village of Cantigny between American and French troops and the German army.
May 29
The Aisne offensive continued as the Germans captured Soissons and pushed the Allies back to the River Vesle.
May 30
The towns of Fere-en-Tardenois and Vezilly were taken by German forces as their advance continued on the Western Front.
May 31
Having fought King Albert I over the neutrality of their country, Gerard Cooreman resigned as Belgian Prime Minister after he had lost the support of his party. He was succeeded by Charles de Broqueville.

(From The Great War - Unseen Archives by Robert Hamilton)


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4441767 - 10/01/18 10:23 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
Joined: Nov 2014
Posts: 1,813
Fullofit Online content
Member
Fullofit  Online Content
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Joined: Nov 2014
Posts: 1,813
Ajax, ON
News of the World for September - Warbirds Rising:

September 1
Australian forces recaptured Peronne from the Germans on the Western Front.
September 2
The defensive line constructed by Germany between the French towns of Drocourt and Queant, was taken by the Canadian Corps during the Hundred Days Offensive as the two day long Battle of the Drocourt-Queant Line began.
September 3
The Second Battles of the Somme and Arras officially ended.
Fanya Kaplan was executed with a bullet to the back of her head in Moscow for the attempted murder of Lenin.
September 4
The Battle of Mont St. Quentin ended in a victory when Australian troops forced the Germans to withdraw.
September 5
North of Vladivostok, Japanese forces captured the strategically important port of Khabarovsk.
September 7
British and French troops pursued German forces as they retreated towards the Hindenburg Line.
September 8
A State Conference of anti-Bolshevik forces was convened in the city of Ufa in an attempt to form a unified anti-Bolshevik authority.
September 9
Charles Ruijs de Beerenbrouck was appointed as Prime Minister of the Netherlands replacing Pieter Cort van der Linden.
September 10
The Red Army's offensive against the Czechoslovak Legion came to an end when Trotsky's troops recaptured the city of Kazan.
September 11
Allied forces seized Ukhtinskaya on the Murmansk Front in North Russia.
September 1
Australian forces recaptured Peronne from the Germans on the Western Front.
September 2
The defensive line constructed by Germany between the French towns of Drocourt and Queant, was taken by the Canadian Corps during the Hundred Days Offensive as the two day long Battle of the Drocourt-Queant Line began.
September 3
The Second Battles of the Somme and Arras officially ended.
Fanya Kaplan was executed with a bullet to the back of her head in Moscow for the attempted murder of Lenin.
September 4
The Battle of Mont St. Quentin ended in a victory when Australian troops forced the Germans to withdraw.
September 5
North of Vladivostok, Japanese forces captured the strategically important port of Khabarovsk.
September 7
British and French troops pursued German forces as they retreated towards the Hindenburg Line.
September 8
A State Conference of anti-Bolshevik forces was convened in the city of Ufa in an attempt to form a unified anti-Bolshevik authority.
September 9
Charles Ruijs de Beerenbrouck was appointed as Prime Minister of the Netherlands replacing Pieter Cort van der Linden.
September 10
The Red Army's offensive against the Czechoslovak Legion came to an end when Trotsky's troops recaptured the city of Kazan.
September 11
Allied forces seized Ukhtinskaya on the Murmansk Front in North Russia.
September 12
The Battle of Saint-Mihiel began between the American Expeditionary Force and French troops against German defensive positions.
The Battle of the Hindenburg line began with a series of Allied offensives. The Battle of Havrincourt between British and German troops was the first of these, ending with a British victory the same day.
September 14
British troops began to evacuate Baku on the Caspian Sea after Turkish forces launched an assault on the city.
September 15
Allied offensive operations began in Macedonia with the Battle of Dobro Pole which ended with a decisive victory over Bulgarian forces.
September 16
Built as a coastal defence ship for the Royal Norwegian Navy, HMS Glatton had to be torpedoed after a fire broke out in one of her magazines in order to prevent an explosion that would have devastated the port of Dover on the Kent coast.
September 18
The Battle of Epehy was fought by British troops under the command of General Henry Rawlinson against German outpost positions in front of the Hindenburg Line.
September 19
The Battle of Megiddo began on the Plain of Sharon between the Allied Egyptian Expeditionary Force and forces from the Ottoman Empire. The assault was the final Allied offensive of the Sinai and Palestine Campaign.
September 20
Allied troops advanced and captured Nazareth and Beisan in Palestine.
September 22
The Ottoman Army was attacked and began to retreat from the River Jordan and Amman.
September 23
Allied forces advanced across the Jordan to capture Es Salt in Palestine.
September 26
The Meuse-Argonne Offensive began early in the morning. After a six-hour-long bombardment on German defences during the previous night, American and French forces advanced against German positions in the Argonne Forest and along the River Meuse.
September 27
The Battle of Canal du Nord began as part of a number of closely sequenced Allied attacks at separate points along the Western Front during the Hundred Days Offensive. The battle took place in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais region of France, along an incomplete portion of the Canal du Nord.
September 28
The Fifth Battle of Ypres, also known as the Advance of Flanders and the Battle of the Peaks of Flanders, began a series of battles in northern France and southern Belgium from late September to October 1918.
September 29
The continuing Battle of the Hindenburg line moved into its next phase as the Battle of the St Quentin Canal began. The offensive involved British, Australian and American forces in a spearhead attack against German troops.
September 30
The Bulgarian Army surrendered and signed an Armistice with the Allied Powers: hostilities ceased at noon.

(From The Great War - Unseen Archives by Robert Hamilton)


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4441771 - 10/01/18 10:58 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: Fullofit]  
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 213
jerbear Offline
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jerbear  Offline
Member

Joined: May 2017
Posts: 213
1st Lt. John B. Goode
147th Aero Squadron, USAS

Tuesday, October 1st 1918

Clear day. Black got the Kellner up and running. Took it up in the afternoon, running like a top. Got the Marlins lined up, will fly out to Brabant-en-Argonne in the morning. Dewey will probably fly out day after tomorrow.

Push going badly. 28 km short of objective. Pershing said to have pulled the 25th Division out yesterday. Putting the 1st, 4th, 26th, & 49th Some Generals said to have been busted.

I hear Rick cooked himself up a hotdog.

No news on Luke. [Linked Image]


Attached Files shot 20.jpg
Last edited by jerbear; 10/02/18 09:56 PM.
#4441789 - 10/02/18 01:21 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: Raine]  
Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 2,278
MFair Online content
Member
MFair  Online Content
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Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 2,278
Raine,
I think it is a fantastic idea, though some of us are not near as eloquent as yourself. I would be glad to give it a go as there are some fantastic story tellers in this group.


Never approach a bull from the front, a horse from the rear or a fool from either end.
BOC Member since....I can't remember!
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