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#4379068 - 09/12/17 01:11 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Banjoman Offline
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Fullofit, that is what we call a close shave. It's good to hear from your other pilots, I've often wondered why you haven't written more about Cyrus and Francois.


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#4379076 - 09/12/17 02:02 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Fullofit Offline
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Banjoman, there just aren't enough hours in a day to fly the missions and do the reports for all the pilots. I've decided to concentrate on one of them. Aldi's career seemed most interesting to me, while the other two are there for diversity, in case I get bored. I do keep their stats up to date.


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4379078 - 09/12/17 02:56 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Helmut von Hammer
on leave . due to Rainy weather


Sep 12, 1917.


Its my last night in the City. Time for a dinner party.

https://giphy.com/gifs/ORzvRmxSa7gk0/fullscreen

Then say goodby to the Countess and back to the Front.

https://giphy.com/gifs/dina-rigg-tr3gtcpqB2L04/fullscreen

#4379079 - 09/12/17 03:09 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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I know what you mean, I should probably do the same, but I'll keep trying to keep up with them if it kills me. biggrin


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#4379147 - 09/12/17 01:32 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Raine Online content
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I haven't been able to keep up with the writing part of the DiD experience, but hope to have a new installment of the Holzhauer papers tonight. I'm travelling for work and will bring my flight notes and pictures with me...

So much going on here these days! First of all, kudos to Lou for the gong festival. It adds a lot to the campaign and is greatly appreciated. Banjoman, that was a well-crafted and touching vignette. We joke about welcoming folks to the meat grinder, but a hundred years ago it was all too true. Fullofit, I really love the way you've been able to blend the historic pictures into your Aldi stories. Keep it up -- I look forward to each episode. Robert, that's a great new, historically accurate livery. Keep an eye on Bishop -- he's a good pilot and the life of the party, but I'm not sure about him all the time. MFair, congrats on your man making Squadron Commander. To my knowledge, there were no transfers between the RFC and RNAS -- it would have required re-badging in a way that was simply not done in the day. After 1 April 1918, though, he could command any squadron in the RAF. Ranks did not immediately change to RAF ranks, it seems. That took until after the end of the war. Carrick, if Helmut can survive the countess he can certainly survive the front!!!

Finally, I am really saddened that Hasse is no longer in the air with us. His stories were always so well done and I appreciated all he has contributed to DiD flying.

See you all soon.

#4379154 - 09/12/17 02:08 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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.

Raine, I certainly hope you will be able to find the time during your travels to write your next installment, they are always wonderful reads.

Hasse, very sorry to learn you've been forced to step away from your WOFF adventures and sharing them with us here. Believe me, I feel your pain when it comes to that. I've not been able to get in a WOFF sortie for months much less write about one.

Very glad though that the rest of you folks are keeping things alive with your postings, they are all much appreciated.

.


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_________________________________________________________________________

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#4379214 - 09/12/17 04:18 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Raine: Helmut is safer at the Front then with the Countess. On a different subject, I too will miss Hasse flying with us.

#4379294 - 09/12/17 11:27 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: carrick58]  
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Originally Posted by Banjoman
I know what you mean, I should probably do the same, but I'll keep trying to keep up with them if it kills me. biggrin

Or them winkngrin

Originally Posted by carrick58
Raine: Helmut is safer at the Front then with the Countess.

So I guess this is it for the Countess? She was starting to grow on me.

Robert, seems Albert is the scourge of the skies if no one wants to engage him. That is a good reputation to have in the unfriendly skies.

Raine, thank you for your praise. I'm honored and I'm looking forward to reading another instalment of Franz's adventures. Hope you'll be able to post from the road.

15 May, 1917 Halluin
Jasta 18

Aldi and Paul were still in foul mood after Walter's departure and could not get excited about the new arrival. Ltn. Richard Runge transferred in today. A rather peculiar looking man for a Jagdflieger. With the glasses he looked more like a teacher than a pilot.

[Linked Image]

Well, they would find out soon enough what Richard is made of. This morning's mission was line patrol from Halluin to Menen and Runge was to be Aldi's wingman.
They were halfway done with their patrol with no contact when all of a sudden black puffs announced the arrival of the enemy.

[Linked Image]

Three pushers were trying to sneak by, but were easily discovered by the Flak battery observers. As soon as they realized they've been targeted by Aldi's flight, one of the Tommies separated and made a run for the lines. Needless to say that was the prey Aldi selected and the Schwarm converged like a pack of hungry wolves. The Fee had no chance. Schwarzkopf demolished the engine with a few well placed salvoes and the big bird went down trailing dirty ribbon of smoke.

[Linked Image]

They regrouped and were on the way to finish their patrol when they ran straight into the remaining two Fees being chased by Schwarm Eins. One Fee was already smoking and fell to their guns but the last one was claimed by the newcomer. Aldi was impressed by the man in glasses. First day on the job and making a name for himself already. Well done! Aldi would have to keep an eye on Ltn. Runge.

[Linked Image]

He may yet prove useful in the future. They all headed for the aerodrome and some well deserved warm meal. The day got off to a good start.

Attached Files 1-Runge.JPG2.jpg3.jpg4.jpg

"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4379301 - 09/13/17 12:14 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Ah, some great reports coming in folks. Thanks for the great read.
Fullofit, Ltn. Runge may be the ace in the hole! I would also like to add, that Francois meeting with the fence is a far cry better than it used to be, eh what??
Carrick, Helmut may need those few days at the front to heal his welts from the whip! biggrin
MFair, I also want to extend my congratulations to Edgar. It's no small feat!!
Banjoman, Thanks for keeping the records straight for us. It is muchly appreciated!!
Raine, thanks for the ack of Albert's skin!

Albert Earl Godfrey

15 May 1917 @ 11h30 DOP for troop and vehicle movement west of Marcoing

At briefing we learned that the wind would be 3 to 4 kn from the SSW with mixed towering cumulus and clear skies

“B” flight was to be lead by Godfrey with Horn, Fry, and Yong accompanying. “A” flight was to assist and composed of Lloyd, Jenkins, Scott and Tremaine

It was a rather balmy day as the flight took off and formed up north of the field at 11h44, attaining an altitude of 7600 ft. They then turned east towards Mont St. Eloi looking for the two F.E. 2b’s from Fienvillers/Candas.

At 11h50 Godfrey spotted two of them at 2 o’clock on the horizon. “B” flight turned in behind them and took up escort position as they headed directly to the lines.

At 11h58 flying at 8000 ft they crossed the lines making their way SE to Marcoing.
The Hun flak was light and mostly concentrated on the F.E.2b’.s as they passed over Athies and Monchy. From there on things were quiet until the approach to Pronville and Brayelles at 12h09. At this point the flak began again, but only lightly. During this leg of the flight, “A” flight was nowhere to be seen and Godfrey prayed that the Hun scouts would be busy elsewhere.

At 12h12 they arrived over Marcoing and the B.E.’s began their work circling the area. They did not linger long.

At 12h18, at an altitude of 8000 ft, “B” flight was approaching the lines in the vicinity of Havrincourt Wood on a SW trajectory and Godfrey was feeling lucky that the Huns had not shown up to molest the B.E.’s his flight was escorting. No sooner had these thoughts left his head, than he noted seven specs approaching high from the west on his port side. They could be Huns or friendlies and Godfrey preferred to cross the lines before having to face a possible enemy flight. He watched them intently as they passed over head and his flight appeared to be unnoticed.

As they approached Lechelle airfield, the B.E.2b’s began to descend, most likely to land. Godfrey kept looking back and noted that that teo specs were getting very close to his flight, probably due to “B” flight having to reduce their speed so as not to over fly the F.E.’s and expose them to possible attack.
Seeing that the two seaters were well on their way down to landing, Godfrey turned into the approaching two aircraft, passing over the first noting the telltale shape of an albatross, He focusing on the second while trying to determine if any more were on the way. These two could possibly have been from the flight of seven that passed them earlier and there was no telling if there were more coming. The Albatros in front of him began a climb directly towards him and Godfrey put a long burst directly at him as he passed by on Godfrey’s starboard side. It seemed evident no further albatri were approaching and Godfrey wasted no time in completing a turn onto the tail of the DIII. It had the markings of MFJ1. He circled with it several times before seeing the opportunity to get on it’s tail as it pulled up and away. Godfrey sent several volleys into the cockpit area and observed the spray of some debris from the craft. It went down in a slow turn and Godfrey lost sight of it as it passed below his fuselage. He did not see it go in but it was clear it was not flying away as he scanned the horizon. Young who was close by confirmed later that it did indeed make a forced landing crashing into the forest below.

Back at base the flight reported in with Godfrey and Horn laying claim to the two Albitri DIII’s that “B” flight had to contend with. “A” flight arriving later claimed two falling to the guns of Lloyd and Jenkins. Scott’s craft was destroyed in a forced landing due to enemy fire and he suffered a light injury. Tremaine on the other hand was killed in a crash due to enemy fire.




Last edited by Robert_Wiggins; 09/13/17 12:15 AM.

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#4379316 - 09/13/17 03:02 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Helmut von Hammer
on leave . due to Rainy weather
The Pvt Aerodrome at the Castle


Sept 13, 1917.

Excusing himself, Helmut casually leaves the Castle of the Countess and boards an Aero- machine headed for the Depots behind the Front

https://giphy.com/gifs/wwi-airplane-wDDIQScGF7U4g/fullscreen

#4379325 - 09/13/17 03:41 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Raine Online content
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Too late to catch up on the latest posts tonight. But here's the next installment in Franz's memoirs...

The Holzhauer Papers
Part 6: 9-14 May 1917


On 9 May at dawn we patrolled along the lines near Reims. The French stayed away and by eight in the morning I was back in bed with no orders for the rest of the day. On getting up, I enjoyed an early lunch of cheese and bread with pickles in the Kasino before heading into Rethel with Wolff. Rittmeister von Brederlow did me the honour of sitting with me. He said he wanted to take a second patrol down to the front. Buckler and Schräder, our irrepressible hunters, were going, and he wanted to know if I was interested. But today I fought the urge. When one gets an Iron Cross 2nd Class it is convention to wear it on the first day, and after that one wears just the ribbon in a buttonhole. Today I wanted to wear that medal on my tunic and strut through town to show it off. True, the award was much more common now than it had been back in 1914 or even 1915, but for me it had significance. I knew how proud my parents would be to see me wear it, and I was off to get my picture taken! Our Staffelführer then announced to us (and later to the assembled group of all the pilots) that he had been posted to Idfleg [1]. Today was his last day with Jasta 17. His replacement would be at dinner, Hauptmann der Reserve Eberhard von Seel. The Hauptmann was coming to us from Bölke’s old Jasta 2. This was sobering. Von Brederlow had been good with me, and I hoped that von Seel would not be one of those typical stuck-up Prussian infantry soldiers. Still, I was off to town. I could worry about the new boss later.

Wolff and I had a wonderful time. My medal, however, went largely unnoticed. Iron Crosses, Wolff said, are like arseholes. Everyone has one. I bought a leather picture frame and left instructions with the photographer to send the finished photo to my parents when it was ready. We had a car at our disposal. Wolff drove like a professional racer. We passed a bottle of champagne back and forth as we thundered along the country lanes, slowing only when we met marching soldiers to avoid splashing mud on the poor fellows.

Back in the Kasino there was a small celebration for me after dinner and we were each introduced to Hauptmann von Seel. He is in his thirties, much older than most of us fliers except, of course, our old man and new officer, Wolff. I admire how Wolff is oblivious to this age difference and fits in with the rest of us who must seem like mere infants to him. Then, to end a wonderful day Hauptmann von Seel sent for my Werkmeister [2], Feldwebel Widmann. The Feldwebel had a surprise for me, I was told. He led me to a hangar and pointed out my new mount, a newly-arrived, factory-fresh 160 hp DIII! It was Christmas without the snow…

On 10 May I led a flight to St-Loup-en-Champagne to chase off some intruders that had been seen there. The new machine felt light and delicate compared to my old DII. Leutnant Sachsenberg, who flew with us that morning, warned me several times not to overstress the bird, for the narrow lower wing and V struts could deform and cause the machine to break up. I listened carefully. We spotted the French machines just south of St-Loup and began stalking them. They were higher than us, but we gained on them. Then they turned to give us a fight. This new DIII was more manoeuvrable than my old steed. In a minute I got close behind one of the Nieuports and chased him as he bobbed and jinked. I held my fire until within a few metres, and then I opened up, seeing my rounds rip into his fuselage and wings. The machine tumbled into a wood below. I did not recognise the location of the wood and could give only a rough direction and distance from St-Loup. Unfortunately, I lacked the witnesses for a confirmed victory.
Leutnant Gros led us the next day. We were patrolling the balloon line in the Reims sector. After nearly an hour in the area several Nieuports made a tentative attack, but we chased them off. I got some good hits on one, but Leutnant Schräder finished him off for the kill.

12 May 1917 saw another engagement with Nieuports, but this time they ran off over their lines.

On 13 May I led the early patrol again, escorting some DFWs to bomb the French field at Rosnay. This time the Nieuports in the area were more aggressive. We had a wonderful fight with much diving and zooming and spiralling of machines all over the sky. I followed one Frenchman down to 500 m. He tried to draw me over the airfield so that his friends on the ground could finish me off. I shouldn’t have done it but I followed him, zig-zagging to throw off the ground gunners’ aim. Then I hit the Nieuport with a good burst. Just as I closed in for the kill, another Albatros appeared directly in front of me, coming directly for me. I pushed the stick hard forward and ducked. There was a sharp bang. My machine shuddered, but the engine was still running. Or was that a new pinging sound? I couldn’t be sure. Everything looked intact, except for some torn linen between the ribs of my right upper wing. The other Albatros had run its wheels along the top of my machine. I looked behind and saw Leutnant Träger’s machine turning for home. The Frenchman was already a mere speck in the distance. I climbed to 1000 m to cross back over the lines and set course for home. Buckler, our Staffel’s Kanone, claimed a Nieuport this day. His score is now seven confirmed victories.

[Linked Image]
" I followed one Frenchman down to 500 m."

Hauptmann von Seel led us for the first time on 14 May. We were back over the balloon line, again ready for action. The French did not come out to play.

Notes:

[1] Inspektion der Fliegertruppen, Inspectorate of Aviation.

[2] Leading mechanic.

Attached Files One that got away.png
#4379361 - 09/13/17 01:07 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Raine, that's quite a cram of missions!
Tell me, when the oncoming Albert bounced it's wheels on your upper plane, did you actually see torn canvas? If so, that is impressive. Did you actually also have some engine damage?

Cheers Mate


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#4379420 - 09/13/17 05:40 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Good stories. Keep em flying

#4379481 - 09/14/17 01:44 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Robert, I'll take barbed wire over the fence any day. Congrats on the latest kill.
Carrick, Helmut must have really been desperate to fly an Eindecker in September of 1917!
Raine, glad you were able to post. It's a pleasure to read your reports. Too bad the unconfirmed kill streak continues. Good luck with that and the new CO. Hopefully he won't be such a hardass.


"Take the cylinder out of my kidneys,
The connecting rod out of my brain, my brain,
From out of my arse take the camshaft,
And assemble the engine again."
#4379492 - 09/14/17 02:50 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Fullof it: The Countess was closing in. lol

#4379497 - 09/14/17 03:02 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Helmut von Hammer
on leave . due to Rainy weather


Sep 14, 1917.

I took the A Train from Germany to France then a Troop Train to the staging area s then it was catch as catch can. a transport Truck, then Armored Car , and finally a ?

Attached Files BR 50 enters Oberhausen-Osterfeld-Sud  Train.jpgQ 57097 trains departing.jpgQ 10450_0  Truck transport.jpgMunich6 Armored Car.jpgFront-wheel-drive three-wheeler with onboard carrier pigeon birdcage German.jpg
Last edited by carrick58; 09/14/17 03:12 AM.
#4379562 - 09/14/17 12:28 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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L'Etoile du Nord
.

Robert, those shots you posted a few days back of Albert's new livery really show of not only his mount but also that outstanding layer of ground mist that is available in Jara's and Buckeye Bob's latest mod update. Also, loving the different viewpoints of take-offs and landings you've been trying out in your videos as of late. Too bad about the loss of Tremaine in Albert's last sortie.

Banjoman, thanks again for keeping and posting the stats, it is much appreciated.

Fullofit, you're lucky that fence landing didn't cause you more grief. Exciting shot what with the shell explosion in the background, and despite full pants I imagine Francois still made good time to the nearest shell hole for cover. And on the other side of the mud it appears Aldi's new jasta mate could prove to be a welcome addition.

Carrick, from the looks of the Countess I think Helmut is quite right about choosing the hostile skies, they're considerably safer. But with his leave now is he rethinking his decision? Let's hope not.

Raine, Christmas indeed came early for Franz: the EK2c and a fresh new mount. Too bad though about that collision with his kette mate, but he's lucky to have landed in one piece and was able to tell the tale.

Wonderful stuff folks, thanks for sharing.

.


[Linked Image]

Three RFC Brass Hats were strolling down a street in London. Two walked into a bar, the third one ducked.
_________________________________________________________________________

Former Cold War Warrior, USAF Security Service 1974-1978, E-4, Morse Systems Intercept, England, Europe, and points above.
"pippy-pahpah-pippy pah-pip-pah"

#4379647 - 09/14/17 06:08 PM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Helmut von Hammer
Jasta 4, JG 1.
Marcke, Flamders.


Sep 15, 1917.

Back to flight, ah its like being unchained or un handcuffed ( the freedom) Dawn Patrol 9 a/c in two flights. We were chasing 3 Spads in the dark cloud leaven skies near Loos when 5 SE 5's appeared out of the skies to our port. My scharm of 5 machines turned into them. I stayed high till I could dive on one who was on my mates tail. 40 -42 rds each time my gun went Tac a Tacka then the e/a dove. looking around I saw 5 Spads joining the fight attacking our high cover . I got off one 43 rd Burst then he too dove away. The flight did get 1 each of the e/a for 1 pilot wnd + 2 damaged in the brawl

Attached Files CFS3 2017-09-14 10-04-24-32.jpgCFS3 2017-09-14 10-10-06-32.jpgCFS3 2017-09-14 10-19-00-22.jpg
#4379698 - 09/15/17 12:18 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: Robert_Wiggins]  
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Raine Online content
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Originally Posted by Robert_Wiggins
Raine, that's quite a cram of missions!
Tell me, when the oncoming Albert bounced it's wheels on your upper plane, did you actually see torn canvas? If so, that is impressive. Did you actually also have some engine damage?

Cheers Mate


Robert, the tear was a bit of artistic licence. Not sure if the other Albatros hit me in truth because I had my eyes closed! I was really shocked to find myself still alive. I'm not sure about the engine damage. There seemed to be metallic pinging, very faint, but by then I was sure something awful would happen -- the wings fall off, fire, etc. In the end Holzhauer simply flew all the way home and landed. He buried his underwear in the back garden of the chateau.

#4379707 - 09/15/17 01:53 AM Re: DiD Centenary Challenge [Re: CatKnight]  
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Fullofit, another great story. Runge looks like he should be a math teacher instead of a fighter pilot. But beneath that thin veneer of civilization...

Robert, great video. I'm impressed by how smoothly you hold your turns in a dogfight. The landing shot from inside the hangar was a great scene.

Carrick, best of luck with the countess. I hope you took notes in the CO's personal hygiene lectures.

Lou, thanks so much for the comments. It means a great deal coming our keeper of the historical archives!

Here is the latest from Holzhauer...

The Holzhauer Papers
Part 7: 15-16 May 1917


The next couple of days were momentous. Weather was becoming warmer by the day. The morning skies were pale blue with high, fluffy clouds – wonderful weather for the hunt! The new leader, Hauptmann von Seel, seemed energetic. He flew often enough to set a good example and he made several new appointments among the NCOs, elevating men of good quality. Our Vzfw Strasser was given a secondary duty to oversee the provisions for our mess and he and he good friend Vzfw Buckler took this as an excuse to get frequent passes to travel into Rethel or as far east as Charleville-Mézières. They would return laden with wine, cheeses, eggs, and chickens. Strasser even managed to acquire three head of cattle and he paid a farmer to tend them for us. It cost us each a few extra francs a week but no one cared. We were living the good life.

The only thing that spoiled our idyll in the chateau was a gift. Wolff’s father had been a longtime friend of the renowned animal trainer and zoo proprietor, Carl Hagenbeck. When I lived in the United States for a few years as a boy I had heard stories about the thrilling exhibits he had staged for the World’s Fair. [1] However it happened, Herr Hagenbeck had thought it a wonderful idea to donate two monkeys and an eagle to the Jasta. The eagle was no problem. He took to our conservatory and nestled among the lush foliage, only occasionally swooping along our sitting areas to make us spill our drinks. The monkeys were something else entirely. At first we were delighted. They were named Heini and Rieke. We taught them to smoke cigars and salute, and built them a little monkey-cabin in the conservatory where they could keep an eye on the eagle. A few of the fellows befriended them, especially Träger and Günther, but the horrid creatures took a dislike to me. They would bare their teeth and throw the filth of their cage at me. My days of sipping claret in the conservatory were finished. Occasionally the fellows let them wander free in the courtyard with the dogs. I stayed clear of the damned things.

Early on Tuesday, 15 May 1917, Leutnant Gros led a group of five of us down to the lines near Reims. Beside Gros, there were Strasser, Sachsenberg, Günther, and me. We climbed to 4000 m and headed south. Over Le Thour we met three Nieuports, a newer model with larger tail stabilisers. Our fight was quickly over, for the Frenchmen put their noses down and headed south for their lines. I saw my chance and dived on the one closest to me. My move was badly judged and I got only a quick shot before I overtook the Nieuport and had to circle back to get behind him. He was climbing now and getting away from me. I strained to catch up but the Mercedes did not seem to be giving full power at this height. Several long range bursts failed to get Monsieur to turn on me. I searched the sky for my colleagues as there seemed to be no point in continuing the chase.

By great good fortune, I looked behind just in time to see the shape of another silvery-white machine diving on me. I heard the distinctive slow tack-tack-tack of a Vickers. I snapped the Albatros around and the French aeroplane nearly collided with me. This was one of the Sopwith bombing machines that carried only the pilot. They were no match for my bus and in little time I was on the Sopwith’s tail. For some reason my rounds did not seem to be flying true. I expended more than 200 rounds and still the Frenchman did not fall. The pilot must have been hit, for he stopped handling the machine lightly. I closed to only about 15 metres and fired several long bursts. The Sopwith tumbled downwards and disappeared in a cloud of brick dust among the ruins of Guignicourt.

[Linked Image]
"I expended more than 200 rounds and still the Frenchman did not fall."

Now I climbed to the southeast looking for Gros and the others. The visibility was good but there was no sign of them. When I glanced back, though, there was a sparkle of sunlight on the wings of an unidentified machine. I could make out the squared-off wingtips of another Sopwith. This fellow thought he’d surprise me, but now I turned on him and we charged at each other, firing all the way. His was a two-seater. He threw it about too sharply for his Franz [2] to swing the heavy machine gun around. We fought each other for five minutes before I put some holes into him. He turned beneath me. We were over the lines and he was trying to escape. I followed him down. The French observer was in action now and bullets whizzed and cracked past me, the long smoke trails of the phosphorous rounds uncomfortably close. I was determined that he would go down or I would. Several loud bangs told me I was in his sights, but he was also in mine. I fired at least another hundred rounds and the machine went down, settling between the lines, or so I thought.

My windscreen had been shattered and there were many holes in my wings. I took no chances and headed for our nearest field at St-Rémy-en-Champagne, landing a few minutes before nine in the morning. It was three in the afternoon before my machine was patched up enough to return home. On landing I claimed the two Sopwiths. The first had already been reported and was immediately confirmed. The second, however, had apparently landed safely between the French forward and reserve trenches. It was listed as merely “zur Landung gezwungen”[3] and not an official kill. Still, it brought my tally up to three official victories.

[Linked Image]
" I took no chances and headed for our nearest field at St-Rémy-en-Champagne, landing a few minutes before nine in the morning."

And then came the greatest thrill of all. At drinks before dinner, Hauptmann von Seel announced that I had been promoted. I was now an officer at last – Leutnant Holzhauer. I could scarcely wait to write my parents and sisters and retired to my room after dinner as soon as I could decently do so, planning to count my money for a trip to the tailor. When I got upstairs, I found that Heini and Rieke had got in from the garden through an open window and torn the place apart. Heini had found my cigars and was happily eating the whole lot of them. Rieke sat on my bed. From his bulging cheeks he spat out feathers from my shredded pillow. Now it was I who bared my teeth!

Notes:

[1] Carl Hagenbeck pioneered reward-based animal training and is widely considered the creator of the modern zoo. During the 1893 World Columbian Exhibition in Chicago, his animals performed at shows, His American circus operation was bought by Benjamin Wallace in 1907 and marketed as the famous Hagenbeck-Wallace Circus.

[2] In the German flying service, pilots were generically referred to as "Emil" and observers as "Franz."

[3] Forced to land. The term was abbreviated "zLgzw."

Attached Files Kill 3.pngSt Remy.png
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