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#3585348 - 06/03/12 03:30 PM Re: Eyewitness ***** [Re: HeinKill]  
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carrick58 Offline
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A really good read.

Inline advert (2nd and 3rd post)

#3585402 - 06/03/12 06:04 PM Re: Eyewitness [Re: HeinKill]  
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Enjoyed reading and looking. What a beautiful piece of software. I could get it just for sight-seeing alone.


System Vitals: Intel 4790K, GTX970, 16GB DDR2000(OC), Win7 Pro 64bit, Saitek AV8R, Logitech G27
Sims: Assetto Corsa, Race '07, StrikeFighters2 (complete series), F4:AF, EECH, IL2:1946, Arma3, X-Plane, MSFS X
#3585956 - 06/04/12 04:32 PM Re: Eyewitness [Re: HeinKill]  
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HeinKill Offline
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Thx, I am getting close to the campaign finale, but not just yet...

driving

Yes, I agree CoD makes for atmospheric screenshots. Helps that you can take a PoV from any object in the game, and that there a literally hundreds if not a thousand different object types, and that the damage modelling is so obsessive that everything in the game has both damaged and undamaged states, and both vehicles and aircraft have multiple damage points.

Makes for an exicitng mission trying to get your Hurricane home without a tailplane, or your 109 with the cowling shot off and engine seizing up!

Shame the game ships with such a limited campaign engine, and badly made campaigns, but that is where the community and 3rd party devs come in I guess!

Cheers,

H



**************

These AARs and screenies are taken from the Sealion Mission Pack, Luftwaffe campaign, available for free download here:

http://bobgamehub.blogspot.com/p/cliffs-of-dover-missions.html

**************


So it was that the war in the air began. Men rode upon the whirlwind that night and slew and fell like archangels. The sky rained heroes upon the astonished earth. Surely the last fights of mankind were the best. What was the heavy pounding of your Homeric swordsmen, what was the creaking charge of chariots, besides this swift rush, this crash, this giddy triumph, this headlong sweep to death?

H. G. Wells, 'The World Set Free,' 1914.
#3587533 - 06/07/12 01:57 AM Panic in London [Re: HeinKill]  
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The Prime Minister Mr Churchill waits for his car outside Downing Street
with Lord President of the Council, Mr Chamberlain, after the news that the
front line has now advanced to Maidstone, just 30 miles from London.









So it was that the war in the air began. Men rode upon the whirlwind that night and slew and fell like archangels. The sky rained heroes upon the astonished earth. Surely the last fights of mankind were the best. What was the heavy pounding of your Homeric swordsmen, what was the creaking charge of chariots, besides this swift rush, this crash, this giddy triumph, this headlong sweep to death?

H. G. Wells, 'The World Set Free,' 1914.
#3587880 - 06/07/12 06:37 PM Re: Panic in London [Re: HeinKill]  
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oldgrognard Online content
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You tease !


Good people sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf.

Someday your life will flash in front of your eyes. Make sure it is worth watching.
#3589451 - 06/10/12 04:01 PM Spoils of War [Re: HeinKill]  
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S-tag +7, Sept 29, morning



Within the Folkestone pocket, German troops have been ordered to pull back and consolidate their lines and 40,000 troops are now concentrated in an area of 100 square miles. Royal Navy destroyers continue their bombardment of the port. Two Royal Navy destroyers involved in the bombardment of Folkestone were put out of commission yesterday after repeated dive bombing attacks by Ju88s, but six Ju88s were lost to fighters and naval AAA. RAF patrols over Folkestone have been increased in response.

Newly appointed Commander in Chief of the Navy, Admiral Karl Doenitz, advises Hitler that an evacuation of the 9th and 16th Army Corps in England, in the style of the British mission at Dunkirk, would be impossible. Hitler appears unconcerned, satisfied his troops can hold until the British nerve breaks.

At Canterbury, British troops and German prisoners are evacuating civilians, and dragging out the dead. The Surgeon General of the Canadian 1st Division estimates at least 15,000 civilian and 3,000 German troops dead, but much of the city is still burning and unsafe to investigate.

In yesterdays daylight fighting 13 RAF aircraft were destroyed for the loss of 27 Luftwaffe aircraft. While the night time Blitz on London has continued, Luftwaffe attacks on British ground forces have been negligible.

Hawkinge Luftwaffe station is now under fire from British short range barrels and in danger of being overrun by the Australian 2nd AIF. Generalfeldmarschall of Luftflotte 2, Albert Kesselring, has finally ordered the men and machines of Lehrgeschwader 2, and Erprobungsgruppe 210 to return to France and continue operations over the battlefield from their bases at Calais.

He 111s of KG 53 from Lille-Nord are ordered in at dawn to evacuate ground staff and equipment.

Personal Diary of Leutnant Hans Kauffmann, KG 53, Sept 29 1940


A change today from the constant night raids on London. Six aircraft from II Gruppe were assigned to take off at 0500 and fly to Hawkinge! This was quite ironic, as I had spent three missions in July trying to blow the place up.

As we flew in, the sun was just coming up in the East, and the Cliffs were lit up bright white, except for the smudges of smoke and debris on the beaches at Folkestone. We saw an Army down there, huddled in the lee of the Cliffs, with Royal Navy destroyers shelling it mercilessly. The port was filled with shattered and sunken ships.





It didn't look like a victorious army to me.

Nor was it a glorious mission we were sent on. Our orders were to help evacuate the ground troops and equipment of JG2 and Erpro 210. When we landed at dawn, we could hear light and heavy arms fire from the West and North of the airfield. The rapid bark of British 2 pounder cannons, and the reassuring crack of our 88mm guns answering back. But as the light strengthened, mortar rounds started landing on the hangars, and aircraft and vehicles, most already wrecked, started burning.



The loading of the aircraft was taking an incredibly long time. We had flown in with our Heinkels stripped to bare skeletons, no guns, no ammunition. The other aircraft were crammed with men, their belongings and all the tools and dies they could carry. Our aircraft however, was loaded with mysterious crates, supervised by a Major from the Waffen SS Polizei Division. He kept asking me what weight we could manage. I must have told him five times we were flying naked and with tanks half full...4 tonnes! I asked him what it was we were being loaded with, but he told me to mind my own business. He also said that if we didn't get it back to France successfully, he'd pursue us in the afterlife. I think he meant it.

Adimar, our dorsal gunner (or on this trip, our dorsal observer!) had a peek in a few of the crates and reported back, "Loot," he said, "Silver, plates, candlesticks, paintings...bet there isn't a plutocrat's house between here and Canterbury that hasn't been plundered."

Finally we were loaded and taxiied out and lined up for takeoff.

In front of us, the last three operational 109s of LG2 took off to fly cover.




And as they did, all hell broke loose to starboard, over by the hangars.



We found out later it was a British armoured scout unit which had knocked out one of our 88s and made it through the perimeter.




The attack caused a panic. Vehicles began rushing in all directions, including straight across the runway.



But the Major in charge of the flight gave the order for us to spool up and get off the ground. He didn't want to be stuck there with British tanks closing on Hawkinge.

It was the last order he gave. As he began to gather speed a column of fleeing troop trucks came out of nowhere, thinking they could squeeze in front of him, or maybe they didn't even see him...no matter. It did for him.



I watched his machine dig into the turf and then go up in a ball of flame.



There must have been 100 men crammed aboard.

But there was no time to think. The crew were yelling at me to get off, get off! I slammed the throttles forward, heading straight for the burning 111 on the runway ahead.



I kicked in a little left rudder, not wanting to veer too far off the close clipped grass and into the verge. It was just enough. The fireball passed under our right wing.



We lifted off with a mighty cheer from Adimar, who broke out into a verse from Wagner. It was certainly like a scene from a Wagner Opera below.



"The little friends are already busy!" Adimar called, and he was right. Hurricanes and 109s spun through the sky above us.




It meant we had a chance at least to get away unmolested.

But now the sun was up, and we were alone in the sky, without guns, and without escort. "At least we might get home, not like those poor buggers down on the beach," Adimar observed. "Oh scheisse! Spitfire!"




We hadn't even cleared Folkestone when the first Indian descended on us.



There were two of them - one went high, the other low. They took the Heinkel to our starboard first, and there was nothing we could do about it. They were careful, but they must have noticed he was not firing back at them, and they made a short meal of him.




Then they came for us.



"Call them Adimar!" I told him, "I'll take us down to the waves so they can only attack from above!"

"Oh, great," Adimar remarked, "Why couldn't I be in the gondola today? Wait...wait...break right! Now!"

I put the lumbering machine into a right hand spiral toward the waves.




The Spitfire was closing on us from the right quarter and he couldnt turn tight enough to keep a bead on us.

He was forced to pull up and away.



But his wingman was not. I had to flatten out to avoid hitting the water, and he was waiting.



His shells walked down the length of the fuselage and punched into our port engine.



I heard a scream from behind, then nothing.

"Adimar?" I yelled, "Admimar where are they?"



There was no response. The bomb aimer, Orman, climbed past me to check on him, but was soon back, "No use," was all he said.

I stayed low, it was all I could think of. As the Spitfires came, again, and again...



I dodged and weaved, kicking wildly at my rudder, and their shells punched the water around us, but thankfully, they mostly missed.



Eventually, they gave up. Out of ammunition, or patience, I would never know.



I saw Calais appear out of the haze, just as my port engine started coughing.



And as we cleared the coast, and I began to bank toward the nearest bomber airfield, which was Peuplinge, the port engine died.



Peuplinge was a short field, even for a bomber base. This was not going to be a pretty landing, I thought to myself. But as I tried the landing gear, I realised it was going to be downright ugly.



The gear would not come down. Orman tried the hand crank, but it did no good. Perhaps it was for the best.

I floated in fat, heavy and with a near dead stick. Foot hard right on the rudder, for all the good it did me, port wing high, slewing across the sky like a drunken crab.




I tried to drop us on the very edge of the field. At the last minute, I pulled the nose high, and we stalled in.





We came to rest about halfway down the landing strip.



After the grinding and tearing of our landing, it was suddenly very quiet. Just the tick of cooling metal.

Then from nowhwere the SS Major appeared, ashen faced. He must have been hiding down among the crates through the whole flight.

"Call yourself a pilot!" he yelled at me, "You nearly got me killed you fool!"

I could see Orman going for his service pistol, but I quietly reached over and put my hand over his, "Sorry Herr Major," I told him, "It will not happen again."


**************

These AARs and screenies are taken from the Sealion Mission Pack, Luftwaffe campaign, available for free download here:

http://bobgamehub.blogspot.com/p/cliffs-of-dover-missions.html

**************





So it was that the war in the air began. Men rode upon the whirlwind that night and slew and fell like archangels. The sky rained heroes upon the astonished earth. Surely the last fights of mankind were the best. What was the heavy pounding of your Homeric swordsmen, what was the creaking charge of chariots, besides this swift rush, this crash, this giddy triumph, this headlong sweep to death?

H. G. Wells, 'The World Set Free,' 1914.
#3589458 - 06/10/12 04:29 PM Re: Panic in London [Re: HeinKill]  
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Super

#3589906 - 06/11/12 03:10 PM Re: Panic in London [Re: HeinKill]  
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Heretic Offline
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Leave stuff on the beaches to the british naval artillery, can't organize proper fighter cover for an evacuation...yeah, that Wehrmacht is bound to fail.

#3589910 - 06/11/12 03:16 PM Operation Sealion: Canterbury Recon [Re: HeinKill]  
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HeinKill Offline
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S-tag +7, Sept 29, afternoon

SECRET

To: Air Chief Marshal Hugh Caswall Tremenheere Dowding
From: Major HEREWARD DE HAVILLAND, D.S.O., M.C., DeHavilland Aircraft Company

Sir

1. I have the honour to refer to your personal request that I overfly the City of Canterbury and provide you with my own report on the effects of the recent aerial bombing of that City.

2. I hope and believe that our Armies may yet be victorious in Kent, but we have to face the possibility that history will judge that if it be so, it was not on account of this tragic action.

3. In this case I presume that there is no-one who will deny that such an overwhelming attack on an English city, by English aircraft, resulting in the deaths of thousands of English civilians, was wrong headed.

4. I would remind you that at the time this raid was ordered, according to all information available to me, including from front line intelligence officers, that German forces in Kent were either beseiged or in retreat on all fronts. Though I must admit to being perplexed at their recent appearance at Maidstone.

5. It behoves me then to communicate to you, the utter devastation I observed. I have appended the photographic account.

6. From a distance, a thick pall of smoke shrouds the city, from the many fires which are still burning 12 hours after the raid. The greater part of the City center appears to be destroyed.



7. Closer inspection from the air proved difficult, due to the density of smoke.




8. Due to prevailing winds however, the Eastern Part of the City was somewhat clearer and here we obtained photographs indicative of the scale of the damage.




9. It being impossible to provide you with a reliable report from the air, we landed at Canterbury civilian airfield and proceeded by motor car to the city to investigate by foot. We found inside the ruined town scenes of utter despair. Such was the intensity of the fire that it left behind scorched earth, blackened vehicles and trees, and small piles of ash where bodies had been completely incinerated by the heat. The fire was capricious, levelling some buildings, while leaving others untouched.





10. The effects of this raid can be equated with the worst results of the Blitz on London, but magnified a hundredfold due to the intensity of the bombing over such a small area. According to the reports of interrogated prisoners, the epicenter of the fireball was the Cathedral itself, where German troops had stockpiled arms, fuel and ammunition in the belief it would not be shelled or bombed. The explosion of this cache was the primary cause of the cataclysmic firestorm.

11. You may excuse us if this report is regarded in any way as being tardy, as we found the best use of our vehicle for the next several hours was to provide transport to the wounded.

12. It is impossible for me to convey adequately the feeling of total desolation which stayed upon us after leaving Canterbury. For this, Sir, I must paraphrase the Bard:

"Woe, destruction, ruin, and decay;
The worst is death, and death has won this day."


I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient Servant,

HEREWARD DE HAVILLAND, Major


So it was that the war in the air began. Men rode upon the whirlwind that night and slew and fell like archangels. The sky rained heroes upon the astonished earth. Surely the last fights of mankind were the best. What was the heavy pounding of your Homeric swordsmen, what was the creaking charge of chariots, besides this swift rush, this crash, this giddy triumph, this headlong sweep to death?

H. G. Wells, 'The World Set Free,' 1914.
#3591037 - 06/13/12 10:38 AM Churchill Resigns / Chamberlain speaks: "The End of War" [Re: HeinKill]  
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S-tag +8, Sept 30, 1940

At 0930 GMT in London today, the Prime Minister Winston Churchill addressed the parliament and the British Commonwealth, announcing his resignation.



We meet today in sad circumstances. The second Battle of Britain approaches its conclusion.

Over the last two days, the forces of the 1st Armoured Strategic Reserve and 29th Infantry Division accepted the surrender of more than 30,000 beseiged German troops at Denton. At Folkestone, our antipodean allies from the 2nd Australian Infantry Division and the New Zealand Division, together with British troops from the 45th Infantry Division and 1st Tank, literally drove the enemy back to the beaches. But several thousand German troops remained in Folkestone, refusing to surrender, and at Maidstone, the spearhead of the German force - blunted, cut off with no hope of resupply, no way forward, nor any way back - also refused to see it had been defeated.

At Canterbury, we faced a similar situation. Here the enemy was dug in. He was heavily armed with tank and cannon, and supplied with arms and ammunition taken from our own stores. Two brave attempts to dislodge him had come to nothing. In addition, we received reports that Herr Hitler's henchmen, the SS, had begun rounding up and executing government officials. In Canterbury we faced the prospect of a bloody seige of unknown duration in the heart of British countryside just 60 miles from London and this was a prospect I determined we could not countenance. Some days ago therefore I ordered Bomber Command, together with the Royal Artillery, to direct upon the German positions at Canterbury a bombardment so devastating it would destroy entirely the ability of German forces there to resist. This it achieved, and yesterday the troops of the 1st and 2nd Canadian Divisions retook Canterbury and accepted the surrender of the German troops in that city.

Unfortunately, upon entering the city, we learned that tens of thousands of British civilians had also lost their lives in the battle for Canterbury. While I steadfastly believe there was no other course we could have pursued, I find my grief at this loss of life intolerable. It is more than I can bear. And I have therefore tendered to His Majesty the King, my immediate resignation from the post of Prime Minister. The King has asked Lord Chamberlain to manage the affairs of government until a new Prime Minister can be appointed by parliament, and this he has accepted to do.

I am not reciting these facts for the purpose of absolution. That, I judge to be utterly futile and even harmful. We cannot afford it. I recite them in order to explain why we did what we did. Now I put all this aside. I put it on the shelf, from which the historians, when they have time, will select their documents to tell their stories. We have to think of the future and not of the past. There will be many who would hold an inquest in the House of Commons, or before the Bench, on the conduct of the Governments-and of Parliaments, for they are in it, too - during the weeks which led up to this catastrophe. They may seek to indict those who were responsible for the guidance of our affairs. This also would be a foolish and pernicious process. There are too many in it.

Let each man search his conscience and account for his actions. I assure you I shall account for mine.


So it was that the war in the air began. Men rode upon the whirlwind that night and slew and fell like archangels. The sky rained heroes upon the astonished earth. Surely the last fights of mankind were the best. What was the heavy pounding of your Homeric swordsmen, what was the creaking charge of chariots, besides this swift rush, this crash, this giddy triumph, this headlong sweep to death?

H. G. Wells, 'The World Set Free,' 1914.
#3591038 - 06/13/12 10:53 AM Churchill Resigns / Chamberlain speaks: "The End of War" [Re: HeinKill]  
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S-Tag +8, Sept 30 1940

0945 GMT, speech to the Parliament by the right honourable Neville Chamberlain, acting Prime Minister.




I do not propose to say many words. The time has come when action rather than speech is required. Two years ago in this House I prayed that the responsibility might not fall upon me to ask this country to accept the awful arbitrament of war. I see now that I can not avoid that responsibility.

But, at any rate, I cannot feel clearer than I do today as to where my duty lies.

No man can say that the Government could have done more to try to keep open the way for an honorable and equitable settlement of the conflict between Germany and Britain. Nor have we neglected any means of making it crystal clear to the German Government that at every turn, we were determined to meet force with force.

That we have done, and of that we should remain proud. But our two mighty nations have battled themselves to a standstill, which already is reminiscent of the Great War, and I am determined we shall not repeat that bloody lesson and once again bleed this nation of the flower of our youth.

We have no quarrel with the German people, but with their government we will take exception whenever and wherever their ambitions exceed their natural rights. I want this to be clear however - war is no longer the way for civilised nations to resolve national disputes. In war we merely pass from one crisis to another, and see one country after another attacked by methods which have now become familiar to us in their sickening technique.

I can therefore advise the honourable members that I have today authorised the Foreign Minister, Lord Halifax, to begin negotations with Germany for a cessation of hostilities between our countries, and the agreement of terms for an armistice favourable to British interests in Europe and throughout the Empire.

We are resolved that war itself must come to an end. If out of this struggle we again re-establish in the world the rules of good faith and the renunciation of force, why, then even the sacrifices that will be entailed upon us will find their fullest justification.



So it was that the war in the air began. Men rode upon the whirlwind that night and slew and fell like archangels. The sky rained heroes upon the astonished earth. Surely the last fights of mankind were the best. What was the heavy pounding of your Homeric swordsmen, what was the creaking charge of chariots, besides this swift rush, this crash, this giddy triumph, this headlong sweep to death?

H. G. Wells, 'The World Set Free,' 1914.
#3591071 - 06/13/12 12:44 PM Re: Churchill Resigns / Chamberlain speaks: "The End of War" [Re: HeinKill]  
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Para_Bellum Offline
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Germany
My hat's off to you, Heinkill.

Great AAR! And an amazing effort to build this campaign.



yep


"...late afternoon the Air Tasking Order came in [and] we found the A-10 part and we said, "We are going where!? We are doing what!?"

Capt. Todd Sheehy, Hog pilot, on receiving orders during Operation Desert Storm

#3591144 - 06/13/12 02:55 PM Re: Churchill Resigns / Chamberlain speaks: "The End of War" [Re: HeinKill]  
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As expected, this AAR has delivered in spades! Fantastic read.
I particularly enjoyed how you went beyond mere mission description and provided a full backdrop to the specific events.

Thanks HeinKill!


looks very modernishy-phoney-windows eighty-tabletty like

Asus P8P67 Pro Rev. 3.0 // i5 2500k @4.3 GHz with Noctua NH-D14 // nvidia gtx 780 // 8 GB DDR3 1600 //Win7 home 64 bit //450 GB VelociRaptor //Recon3D Champion
#3591146 - 06/13/12 03:01 PM Re: Churchill Resigns / Chamberlain speaks: "The End of War" [Re: HeinKill]  
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Heretic Offline
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I don't believe it...what a twist! eek


SHQ absolutely needs an AAR hall of fame...and this one in it!


(Also, a PDF version of it.)

#3591173 - 06/13/12 03:40 PM Re: Churchill Resigns / Chamberlain speaks: "The End of War" [Re: HeinKill]  
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carrick58 Offline
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An Epic, Well done. charge

#3591233 - 06/13/12 05:22 PM Re: Churchill Resigns / Chamberlain speaks: "The End of War" [Re: HeinKill]  
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Boilerplate* Offline
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Peace in our time! RTFM


It's a Game. smile
#3591269 - 06/13/12 06:36 PM Re: Churchill Resigns / Chamberlain speaks: "The End of War" [Re: HeinKill]  
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theKhan Offline
resident pacifist (sic)
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Bravo! Bravo!!!

Hats off to you sir!


I used to work for a living, but then I took an arrow to the knee.
#3591525 - 06/14/12 07:29 AM Re: Churchill Resigns / Chamberlain speaks: "The End of War" [Re: HeinKill]  
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HeinKill Offline
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Hold off on the congrats gents...welcome though it is...there is one more rather important mission in the campaign...


So it was that the war in the air began. Men rode upon the whirlwind that night and slew and fell like archangels. The sky rained heroes upon the astonished earth. Surely the last fights of mankind were the best. What was the heavy pounding of your Homeric swordsmen, what was the creaking charge of chariots, besides this swift rush, this crash, this giddy triumph, this headlong sweep to death?

H. G. Wells, 'The World Set Free,' 1914.
#3591556 - 06/14/12 10:42 AM Re: Churchill Resigns / Chamberlain speaks: "The End of War" [Re: HeinKill]  
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Vitesse Online content
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I was wondering!

#3592050 - 06/15/12 06:39 AM Re: Churchill Resigns / Chamberlain speaks: "The End of War" [Re: HeinKill]  
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skimbo Offline
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Omg! Let's be to it then sir


Never open an umbrella in your trousers
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