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#3524882 - 02/23/12 02:07 PM Re: AARs from Operation Sealion, the invasion of Britain (Cliffs of Dover): update 8 FEB, S-tag +2 ***** [Re: HeinKill]
Heretic Offline
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Registered: 10/12/06
Posts: 1801
Loc: GER
Originally Posted By: HeinKill
Yes. Assumption based on Sandhurst framework is that by Sept 25 Germany will get most of 2 waves, or 90,000 men, ashore. There are three elements that play a huge role in coming days:

- can Germany get its 3rd echelon ashore and reinforce, when full force of superior Royal Navy home fleet is used by Britain, or
- can another port be captured, or can sufficient supplies be moved through Folkestone, to meet the materiel demands of the invasion, or
- can Germany capture sufficient strategic territory, eg Canterbury/Kent/Ramsgate, to provoke Britain to negotiate before resupply becomes an issue?


The RN will most probably be victorious in the channel. There's no way it can be stopped by the KM alone. And the Luftwaffe would have to carpet bomb the channel to properly assist. But this isn't going to happen, because they're to busy redecorating urban London...
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#3527060 - 02/27/12 10:03 AM Re: AARs from Operation Sealion, the invasion of Britain (Cliffs of Dover): update 8 FEB, S-tag +2 [Re: HeinKill]
HeinKill Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 05/25/06
Posts: 2835
Loc: Denmark
Seelowe 12: Sept 25 morning, S-tag +3

In yesterday's fighting the RAF lost 97 more fighters leaving only 440. The SE England airfields of 11 Group, Bomber and Coastal Command are cratered ruins, and once more the threat of collapse, which had receded in early September, is looming. The Luftwaffe had lost another 71 fighters and 142 bombers. Few of the final 2nd wave German reinforcements made it through the British naval and air blockade of Folkestone. Despite stubborn resistance by the 1st and 2nd Canadian divisions overnight, the German XXXXI Army Corps, with the 10th Panzer as its spearhead, captured intact one of the two bridges over the lesser River Stour at Kingston, and troops are pouring across. However, in the early morning, the British VII Corp committed its 1st Armoured strategic reserve, comprising Valentine and Cruiser tanks, on the left flank of the German salient. The German supply line to Kingston is stretched tight, and the British intend to cut its throat. The British armour has been met at Elham by the Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler Regiment, comprising mobile troops, a vehicle mounted flak battalion and a Stug batterie. The first major tank battle on British soil is about to be joined.


At Elham Water Tower, the Stug batterie of the Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler advances to a treeline overlooking a clearing. The low, squat forms will be hidden in the bushes, while the British tanks which their scouts have warned them are advancing toward them, will have to cross the open field to engage.



Alongside them, providing cover against both aircraft and troops, a truck mounted flak battery.



To the west, three companies of Valentines, and one company of the heavier Cruisers from the 1st Armoured Strategic Reserve, advance on Elham. The precious remnants of an army demoralised and disarmed at Dunkirk.



Elsewhere, Wellingtons of bomber command trudge toward Kingston, with 111 Sq Hurricanes in escort. Their target, the southern bridge over the Lesser Stour river, now being used to ferry German troops and armour across to the western bank for an attack on Canterbury. The bridge must be destroyed.





64 Squadron hastens from Manston to support the armour pushing on Elham and the East flank of the German salient, while opposing them, staffeln of LG2 and JG 26 circle above, and Jabos of Erpro 210 take off from Hawkinge for a strike on British positions at Elham.







At Elham water tower, the first Valentines break cover and immediately the Stugs open fire, claiming a victim.



The Valentines return with a volley from their 2 pounders, but the shells slam into the 50mm thick front armour of the Stugs without effect. The Stugs fire again and this time one of the British Cruisers stalls, is hit again, and explodes. The British attack falters under the hammer blows from the German 75mm guns.




The Cruisers add the anger of their 2 pounders to the din of battle, and one of the Stugs is hit. Another crouches behind its burning hulk, camouflaged by the flames and smoke, and opens fire.



High above the slaughter yard, Squadron Leader Randolph Stuart Mills of 247 Squadron, leads his pilots into a tight starboard turn to prepare their attack run. He has waited four months for this day. Four months since he was shipped home from 263 Squadron at Narvik in a hospital ship after crashing his damaged Gladiator. Four months since 263 Sq was decimated at Narvik by the Luftwaffe, even though they managed to take 26 of the enemy with them. Four months since the 10 surviving pilots of 263, shipping home on the aircraft carrier Glorious, died when the Glorious was met and sunk by the battleships Scharnhorst and Gneisau.



He should have been with them. But today, as he passes over the tank battle raging below - German tanks, on British soil - he is glad he wasn't.

He had returned to duty with 247 Sq, and had been preparing his men for a transition to Hurricanes, when the invasion started. They'd been kept out of the fight for the first few days, frustrated and cooling their heels. Until today. He looks over his lower wing. Their 4 .303s would be useless against the armour...but then he sees what he wants. Soft skinned targets...truck mounted flak.

He leads the squadron down, and jams his thumb hard on the gun button.










_________________________

So it was that the war in the air began. Men rode upon the whirlwind that night and slew and fell like archangels. The sky rained heroes upon the astonished earth. Surely the last fights of mankind were the best. What was the heavy pounding of your Homeric swordsmen, what was the creaking charge of chariots, besides this swift rush, this crash, this giddy triumph, this headlong sweep to death?

H. G. Wells, 'The World Set Free,' 1914.

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#3527080 - 02/27/12 10:17 AM Re: AARs from Operation Sealion, the invasion of Britain (Cliffs of Dover): update 8 FEB, S-tag +2 [Re: HeinKill]
komemiute Offline
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Boy, you're good.
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#3527099 - 02/27/12 10:33 AM Re: AARs from Operation Sealion, the invasion of Britain (Cliffs of Dover): update 8 FEB, S-tag +2 [Re: HeinKill]
HeinKill Offline
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Registered: 05/25/06
Posts: 2835
Loc: Denmark
Seelowe 12: Sept 25 morning, S-tag +3 (Continued)

Over Kingston, the bomber command Wellingtons begin their run. LG2 109s and 111 Sq Hurricanes tangle.



Flak erupts from the German positions, schrapnel slicing through the airframe of Wellington KH-A. Perforating wings, fuselage, fuel and oil lines and killing the nose gunner.



The pilot presses on, determined to finish the job. He falls behind the main pack, vulnerable to flak and fighters. Ahead he watches the flight leader drop, and the other Wellingtons drop on his cue. But the drop is late, and the bombs explode uselessly on the far bank of the river among an abandoned British tent camp.

Now it is their turn. The machine jumps as the heavy ordnance falls away.





There is no time to watch the bombs fall, he banks as hard as he dares, and straightens out just as his rear gunner shouts in alarm and cannon shells from a 109 slice across his starboard wing.



He can't hold it level now. He gives the order to bail out, and as the machine starts a slow right hand spiral, he looks out the cockpit window, to see his bombs slam home... right across the length of the Kingston South Bridge.





As he struggles in his parachute toward the open bomb bay doors, and the howling sky beyond, he sees the machine is empty, and hopes the lads got out alright, those who still could. And that someone gives his bomb aimer a bloody medal!

Back above Elham, Squadron leader Mills and the other Gladiator pilots have their own Emils to deal with, the 109s cutting and slashing down on the slower Gladiators without mercy. One after the other falls to an Emil's cannons.







Mills spins his machine on its wingtip, desperately avoiding enemy fire and aircraft that seem to be all around him.







He throws his machine down at the treetops, hoping to lose himself in the canopies.



...just as 64 Squadron Spitfires arrive, and give the 109s someone more their own size to fight against...





Mills calls his squadron to form up on him, North of Elham. Of the six aircraft he took into battle, only one responds.



He circles their landing field at Canterbury in vain hope, waiting for the others.



There are none. Only empty hangars await him as he brings his machine to a stop.



But he is beyond grief now. He grieved when his comrades went down with HMS Glorious in the North Sea. Now the only emotion he feels is icy hatred.

247 Squadron will be converting to Hurricanes now.

The war will wait for him.

Of that he is sure.

At Elham, the bombs of Erpro 210 rain down on the advancing armour of the British 1st Armoured Reserve. But the British tanks continue forward.





Now the first of the faster Valentines reaches the line of Stugs. Their cannons are mounted fast to their hulls, and cannot swivel to engage him. Besides which, the bigger threat of the Cruiser tanks lies to their front.



The Valentine slides through their ranks. Their armour is weaker at the sides and rear. With relentless efficiency his gunner slams shell after shell into the line of Stugs.







The German line breaks. Spinning away from the threat in front and to their rear, the Stugs speed desperately for the cover of the forest as the remaining flak trucks cover them...







It is 0915 25 September on S-tag +3, and the German supply line for the push on Canterbury is threatened.
_________________________

So it was that the war in the air began. Men rode upon the whirlwind that night and slew and fell like archangels. The sky rained heroes upon the astonished earth. Surely the last fights of mankind were the best. What was the heavy pounding of your Homeric swordsmen, what was the creaking charge of chariots, besides this swift rush, this crash, this giddy triumph, this headlong sweep to death?

H. G. Wells, 'The World Set Free,' 1914.

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#3527484 - 02/27/12 09:02 PM Re: AARs from Operation Sealion, the invasion of Britain (Cliffs of Dover): update 8 FEB, S-tag +2 [Re: HeinKill]
Heretic Offline
Member

Registered: 10/12/06
Posts: 1801
Loc: GER
With some decent acting and FX this could be much of a script for a "made for DVD" movie.

Maye we should go all "Iron Sky" on the flightsim community...and beyond!
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#3531185 - 03/03/12 03:38 AM Re: AARs from Operation Sealion, the invasion of Britain (Cliffs of Dover): update 8 FEB, S-tag +2 [Re: HeinKill]
HeinKill Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 05/25/06
Posts: 2835
Loc: Denmark
Seelowe 13: Sept 25 early afternoon, S-tag +3

The German supply situation is critical. Despite three days of fighting the only port which has been captured is Folkestone, which can only support 150 tonnes an hour of supplies at full capacity. The actual rate of offloading is currently 90 tonnes, due to constant air and artillery bombardment.

Transport Fleet C, transporting critical infantry, panzer, staff and corps troops and supplies was intercepted and fewer than 20% of the ships made it to port. Of the two destroyer flotillas from Cherbourg and four torpedo boat flotillas available to escort the convoys at on S-tag minus 1, only 4 destroyers and one torpedo boat flotilla remain.

The decoy action of the morning however was successful in luring away heavy ships from the British Home Fleet, and the light cruisers Emden, Nurnberg, and Koln have now turned back toward Norwegian ports to evade British pursuit. Transport Fleet E is now approaching the Dover coast. It is transporting the first echelons of the 6th Mountain Division, 8th and 28th infantry, a company from Panzer Battalion D and staff and corp troops of the VIII and X army corps, plus vital fuel and ammunition.

If it does not dock and unload successfully at Folkestone, the invasion cannot be sustained.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kmuDi2F60-8

_________________________

So it was that the war in the air began. Men rode upon the whirlwind that night and slew and fell like archangels. The sky rained heroes upon the astonished earth. Surely the last fights of mankind were the best. What was the heavy pounding of your Homeric swordsmen, what was the creaking charge of chariots, besides this swift rush, this crash, this giddy triumph, this headlong sweep to death?

H. G. Wells, 'The World Set Free,' 1914.

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#3531535 - 03/03/12 04:39 PM Re: AARs from Operation Sealion, the invasion of Britain (Cliffs of Dover): update 8 FEB, S-tag +2 [Re: HeinKill]
Heretic Offline
Member

Registered: 10/12/06
Posts: 1801
Loc: GER
How did that old saying go? Any landing you can be carried away from consciously is a good one? biggrin

Weird leader behaviour though. "FOR THE FÜHRER!"-suicide mode?
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#3531915 - 03/04/12 08:26 AM Re: AARs from Operation Sealion, the invasion of Britain (Cliffs of Dover): update 8 FEB, S-tag +2 [Re: HeinKill]
theKhan Online   content
resident pacifist (sic)
Member

Registered: 04/21/01
Posts: 2109
Loc: Canada
Loving your AAR, please keep em rolling!!
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#3532350 - 03/04/12 10:07 PM Re: AARs from Operation Sealion, the invasion of Britain (Cliffs of Dover): update 8 FEB, S-tag +2 [Re: HeinKill]
wheelsup_cavu Offline
Lifer

Registered: 12/03/08
Posts: 21546
Loc: Corona, California
Nicely done Heinkill.


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#3533678 - 03/06/12 04:15 PM Re: AARs from Operation Sealion, the invasion of Britain (Cliffs of Dover): update 8 FEB, S-tag +2 [Re: HeinKill]
HeinKill Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 05/25/06
Posts: 2835
Loc: Denmark
Seelowe 14: Sept 25 late afternoon, S-tag +3

Following concerted British air and sea attack throughout the afternoon, 87% of shipping in Transport Fleet E was lost, along with 3 destroyers and 15 torpedo boats. In the air, the RAF has so far lost 23 aircraft today, to 13 Luftwaffe. The British armoured thrust at Elham was successful, and the SS Leibstandarte Adolf Hitler has been cut off from Folkestone and is making a fighting withdrawal north toward Denton, pursued by the British 1st Armoured and elements of the NZ Division. Meanwhile, the 1st and 2nd Canadian succeeded in re-establishing control over the River Stour crossings at Kingston and is reinforcing for an early morning counter-attack against the 10th Panzer and troops of the Germany XXXXI Army Corps regrouping at Denton. The German VII Army Corps and 8th Panzer has succeeded in penetrating to the streets of Dover, and fighting is taking place from house to house, within sight of the Port. In the West, the 7th Flieger Division has withdrawn to Hythe township and is digging in. In the East intense fighting continues near Manston, with Kampfgruppe Bauer reporting their light mortars are within range of the airfield.


Major Hereward de Havilland, chief test pilot for de Havilland aircraft company, was at home with his wife and two children when the telephone rang on September 22 1940. His wife had noted he had been distant during the meal - she assumed because he was worried about the latest tests on the de Havilland Mosquito prototype. She was wrong.

The male voice at the other end did not identify himself. "Major de Havilland?", he asked.

"Yes. Who is this?"

"Banquet lights," was all the voice said, before the line was disconnected.

It may have been a short message, but he had been waiting for it, and it was one de Havilland had been dreading. He walked back in to where the family was having their tea. His wife knew, without asking, that he had been called back.

He had kissed her on the forehead, pinched the cheeks of his two toddlers, and then gone to the hall cupboard and taken out his attaché case. He had driven immediately to the de Havilland aerodrome at Hatfield where frantic activity was already underway, with engineers fitting each of the six Tiger Moth training aircraft of the 1st Elementary Flying Training School with bomb racks holding 8 x 20lb anti-personnel bombs.

de Havilland had opened his locker, and taken out a parachute, flying suit, service gas mask, tin helmet and gas cape. The gas mask, helmet and cape were tied into the student's seat of the Tiger Moth, together with a service pistol, in case he was brought down behind the lines. He had reflected on this - behind the lines, in Kent! German troops had landed overnight, and now the Western front had come to Britain. The thought made his blood run hotter.

But operation Banquet Lights had been a suicide operation, as he'd expected. Of the six Tiger Moths that took off from Hatfield, weighed down with the small ineffectual bombs, only five had made it to the invasion beach head, and only one had made it back to Hatfield.

Now it was 25 September. Could it really only have been 3 days? His short lived career as a combat pilot had been curtailed, but he still had a choice - return to Hatfield to continue work with his brother on the new Mosquito aircraft, or fly recon missions for the Office of Strategic Services, the OSS. He knew his temperament could not cope with test flying the next generation of fighter, when war, real war, was being waged just a hundred miles away. So each day, five times a day, he had taken one of the company's Tiger Moths up, with a photographer in the student's seat, and flown out to find and fix the advancing German lines.

Each day the front line got depressingly further from Folkestone, closer to Canterbury. Yesterday Panzers had advanced as far north as Kingston on the Lesser Stour, and Elham in the West. But they had been thrown back from Kingston by the 1st and 2nd Canadian Divisions, after being carpet bombed by Bomber Command Wellingtons and strafed by the new cannon armed Beaufighters. In the West, the Stugs and truck mounted flak batterie of the Liebstandarte SS Adolf Hitler were routed by Valentine and Cruiser tanks of the British 1st Armoured Reserve.

Churchill had held his armoured counter attack until he saw the enemy commit himself on Canterbury. He knew he had only one roll of the dice with the precious few tanks of the British VII Corps, but they had prevailed, and cut the throat of the German salient. The enemy was now bottled up at Denton - elements of the 10th Panzer retreating south from Kingston, while the German XXXXI Corps and Leibstandarte SS were pushed north.

de Havilland had been told that upward of 30,000 enemy troops were being bottled up at Denton, but where precisely? It would be his job to find out.

In the hills north of Selstead, guns of the Royal Artillery 58th Medium Regt., veterans of France, are readied for a night time bombardment of German positions at Denton, as soon as they are identified.



de Havilland decides to start his search at Kingston, the scene of the previous day's hard fought battle for the vital bridges over the Lesser Stour river.




He would follow the main Canterbury road south from Kingston, through Denton, toward Hawkinge. There should be German forces heading south from Kingston, and others advancing north away from Elham, converging on Denton. Maybe their positions would give him a clue as to where the main body of the German forces was lurking. In the distance he could see smoke pyres - perhaps indicating burning vehicles...



In the sky above, 111 Squadron flies a protective combat patrol, their job to deter any interest in the low flying and defenceless Tiggie.



They soon have their work cut out for them as LG2 109s out of Hawkinge begin to object to their presence. They do their job, keeping the 109s busy, but it does not go well.











The wounded 111 Sq Hurricanes fight back gamely, but the more experienced pilots of LG2 have their measure









No matter, it is just enough to keep the sky clear for de Havilland.

5 miles out of Kingston, he sees a line of Panzer IIs heading cross country. They try to pull under cover, but are too slow.







He marks their direction and position.



Looking in their direction of travel he sees a small fire on a hilltop outside Denton. Too small to be seen from altitude...but could it be a visual marker for scattered German troops to home on?



Squinting between the spars of his wings, he thinks he can make out tents, or camo netting.



He turns the Tiger Moth toward the hill. Within minutes his suspicions are confirmed as angry flak begins to erupt in front of him.





He doesn't dare overfly it, but gives his photographer a nice beam shot. The hillside is swarming with Boche!







A large portion of the trapped German XXXXI army seems to be digging in on the hill overlooking Denton.





He scurries for cover, flak from 88s and lighter 30mm chasing him all the way.





As he dodges and weaves, his observer points at the ground. There below...a lone Stug pushing through a field. Perhaps a remnant of the fleeing Leibstandarte SS.



It hides in the shadow of some trees, invisible to high flying recon, but not to his Tiggie...





Then his observer punches the air with both fists, pointing ahead. Hot on the heels of the Stug, surrounded by the shattered hulks of German flak trucks, they can see Cruiser tanks of the 1st armoured, ploughing north, up the road toward Denton.







It occurs to him that this one road tells the whole tale of the German advance so far. On the first day they took Folkestone. Then broke through the GHQ stop line, and captured Hawkinge. From there, this road led them directly north, to Kingston, the furthest point of their advance, 12.9 miles from Folkestone - where the 1st and 2nd Canadian finally threw them back. Meanwhile they tried to widen their front to the West, before the Cruisers and Valentines of the 1st Armoured gave them a bloody nose. They were only 12 miles from their target of Canterbury but now they were trapped on this road, the Canadian Divisions pushing them southward...the 1st Armoured pushing them north.

To a hilltop in Denton.

He leaves the Cruisers to their pursuit.



As he turns back toward Hatfield, he hears flapping and banging outside his cockpit, and notices the fabric on his right wing is starting to come away, as small rips caused by the flak start to tear open in his slipstream. The flak had passed right through the lightweight construction of the Tiger Moth without exploding, which was a blessing. But it had been an uncomfortable few minutes!



Luckily the Gipsy Major engine keeps singing its two note song without complaint.

"I'll have to tell Geoffrey about this one", de Havilland thinks quietly to himself. Geoffrey his brother, the man who designed the Tiger Moth. The man who was no doubt, right now, pouring over drawings of his beloved Mosquito.

Tell him wood and fabric is all well and good for surviving a good flakking, but what his Mosquito really wants is speed


***

It is the end of day 4 of the Sealion invasion. 90,000 German troops are ashore, and Germany holds the port of Folkestone, and Hawkinge fighter command field, but has been held out of Dover, and the paratroop attack on Manston has not yet succeeded in taking that airfield. The supply situation is critical, with no further prospect of resupply due to the dominance of the Royal Navy in the Channel. A Fuhrer Conference has been convened for 0500 Sept 26 to review the situation.



Now encircled, 30,000 troops of the XXXXI Army Corps, and including remnants of the 10th Panzer and Leibstandarte SS, are digging in at Denton. With de Havilland's report to guide them, it is just a matter of time before they will hear the banshee roar of British long range artillery.



















_________________________

So it was that the war in the air began. Men rode upon the whirlwind that night and slew and fell like archangels. The sky rained heroes upon the astonished earth. Surely the last fights of mankind were the best. What was the heavy pounding of your Homeric swordsmen, what was the creaking charge of chariots, besides this swift rush, this crash, this giddy triumph, this headlong sweep to death?

H. G. Wells, 'The World Set Free,' 1914.

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